Emmy Award Winners 2017: Hulu’s 'Handmaid's Tale' Win Heralds Television’s New 'Big Three'

Last year, when Jill Soloway accepted her Emmy Award for directing Transparent, she hoisted it in the air and hollered “topple the patriarchy!” At the time, she was talking about trans rights, civil rights, and the feminist movement, mostly on TV but globally, too. Twelve months later, The Handmaid’s Tale, a show where the patriarchy literally rules all and women’s only hope of survival is to topple it, won the Emmy for Outstanding Drama, becoming first series from a streaming service to do so.

The win didn’t just cement Hulu’s position alongside Netflix and Amazon as creative class leaders. Along with a strong overall showing by Netflix, it underscored that streaming’s Big Three now hold the same vaunted space that the major broadcast networks did for much of the 20th century.

For decades, TV was ruled by NBC, ABC, and CBS—the so-called Big Three—but in the last 15 years, their grip on the industry was loosened thanks to “prestige” shows from the likes of HBO, AMC, and Showtime. Those networks, and others like them, were able to move past TV’s traditional gatekeepers by making shows that didn’t have to be primetime-friendly (read: full of sex and gunplay and without laugh tracks) and didn’t even necessarily have to appease advertisers. Now, completely unencumbered by television scheduling and bolstered by huge Silicon Valley budgets, a new class of networks—led by Netflix, Amazon, and Hulu—is taking over.

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All told, streaming services—Netflix, Amazon, and Hulu—took home 32 Emmys this year during yesterday’s ceremony and the Creative Arts awards the weekend before. Granted, HBO by itself collected 29 awards, even without the help of Game of Thrones, but streaming services still drummed up more awards than the original Big Three networks (NBC, ABC, and CBS) garnered this time around: 26. It’s also more than the networks that helped launch Hulu—NBC, ABC, Fox—pulled in: 27. And the bulk of those wins came from pushing the kind of norms-toppling programming that helped TV-that’s-not-really-TV stand out in the first place.

During Sunday night’s ceremony, the Television Academy did a fair amount of self-congratulating for the industry’s diversity. And while it’s true that a lot of Emmys went to shows that feature women, people of color, and LGBTQ characters, those awards have been slow to come. When Donald Glover won last night for Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series for Atlanta, he became the first black man to do so. When Master of None’s Lena Waithe won the award for best writing for a comedy series, she became the first black woman to do so (presumably the first queer black woman to do so as well). That’s not great, Bob. But the fact of the matter is, Emmys can only be given to shows that actually get made, and in the play-it-safe world of La La Land, it’s been streaming services that make the bolder, braver shows.

Take Netflix, for example. When that service initially got into making TV rather than re-packaging it, it did so with House of Cards and Orange Is the New Black, which used the story of a middle-class white lady’s time in prison as an opportunity to tell the stories of transwomen and women of color. (Creator Jenji Kohan literally called her protagonist a “Trojan horse.”) The awards followed. Soon after, Transparent made Amazon an awards contender, a show that, in Soloway’s words, finds its heroes in “unlikable Jewish folk, queer folk, trans folk.” And now here comes Hulu, which just planted its own Emmys flag thanks to a show that—its problematic relationship with race notwithstanding—focuses on the ways society can strip women of their agency. It even nabbed an Emmy for star Elisabeth Moss—something not even Mad Men could do.

The Emmys rewarded cable’s efforts as well. In her acceptance speech for Big Little Lies, HBO’s most-awarded show, Reese Witherspoon encouraged studios to “bring women to the front of their own stories.” It’s a good thing HBO did; otherwise it would’ve been sucking wind compared to its streaming network contemporaries.

It’s also worth noting that while Netflix nabbed a few Creative Arts Emmys for Stranger Things, the show got shut out during the telecast. It also only got one award last night for its expensive critical darling The Crown—for John Lithgow for best supporting actor in a drama series. Meanwhile, its big winners were Master of None, which won for Waithe’s excellent episode about a young woman coming out to her mother, and anthology series Black Mirror, which won two awards for “San Junipero”—an installment that used sci-fi tropes to tell a queer love story in an era that didn’t really have many of those (the 1980s, roughly). Amazon got shut out during Sunday night’s show, but considering Hulu picked up the slack and then some, it should be clear that, creatively, television is evolving to have a new Big Three—none of which are actually, you know, on TV in the traditional sense.

Streaming services have long supported diverse, ambitious, genre-breaking shows is kind of an old tale at this point. What’s astounding is that there are now three major players in this space. The easiest joke to make about TV in the last few years has been that there’s just too damn much of it to watch, but The Handmaid’s Tale‘s big night just proved there’s still room at the top for more. Hulu will obviously see this as a sign that they should do more original programming, audacious original programming. So will their contemporaries—online and off. At the end of last night’s ceremony, when Handmaid’s took home the big award, showrunner Bruce Miller ended his speech by telling the entire television industry that there were goals to accomplish, that there were a lot of tales that—because of suppression or perceived lack of interest—hadn’t been told, and it was time to find places to start telling them. “Go home and get to work,” he said. “We have a lot of things to fight for.”

Tech

5 tech trends that have Turing Award winners worried

Technology has considerable potential to make the world better, but those benefits are far from guaranteed. Plenty of downsides can pop up along the way, and some of them have Turing Award winners especially worried.

1. The internet echo chamber

“Technology by itself is not evil, but people can use it for bad things,” Barbara Liskov, an Institute Professor at MIT, told an audience of journalists Thursday at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum in Germany. “I do worry a lot about what’s going on.”

The ability to selectively filter out news and opinions that don’t agree with one’s own viewpoint is one of Liskov’s top concerns.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

5 tech trends that have Turing Award winners worried

Technology has considerable potential to make the world better, but those benefits are far from guaranteed. Plenty of downsides can pop up along the way, and some of them have Turing Award winners especially worried.

1. The internet echo chamber

“Technology by itself is not evil, but people can use it for bad things,” Barbara Liskov, an Institute Professor at MIT, told an audience of journalists Thursday at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum in Germany. “I do worry a lot about what’s going on.”

The ability to selectively filter out news and opinions that don’t agree with one’s own viewpoint is one of Liskov’s top concerns.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

5 tech trends that have Turing Award winners worried

Technology has considerable potential to make the world better, but those benefits are far from guaranteed. Plenty of downsides can pop up along the way, and some of them have Turing Award winners especially worried.

1. The internet echo chamber

“Technology by itself is not evil, but people can use it for bad things,” Barbara Liskov, an Institute Professor at MIT, told an audience of journalists Thursday at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum in Germany. “I do worry a lot about what’s going on.”

The ability to selectively filter out news and opinions that don’t agree with one’s own viewpoint is one of Liskov’s top concerns.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

EY Announces Rightpoint Co-founders Ross Freedman and Brad Schneider as EY Entrepreneur Of The Year? 2015 Award Winners in the Midwest


Chicago, Ill (PRWEB) June 19, 2015

EY today announced that Co-founders Ross Freedman and Brad Schneider of Rightpoint, a technology and creative agency, received the EY Entrepreneur Of The Year® 2015 Award in the Business Services category in the Midwest program. The award recognizes outstanding entrepreneurs who demonstrate excellence and extraordinary success in such areas as innovation, financial performance, and personal commitment to their businesses and communities. Ross and Brad were selected by an independent panel of judges, and the award was presented at a special gala event at the Sheraton Chicago Hotel & Towers on June 17, 2015.

“We are honored and humbled by the recognition from EY,” said Ross. “This award is in large part a reflection of the Rightpoint team members and the ‘intraprenurial’ culture they’ve helped us build.”

Headquartered in Chicago, with offices in Detroit and Denver, Rightpoint is an award-winning, technology and creative agency specializing in areas including, customer experience, employee engagement, custom application development, cloud strategy, CRM and mobile. Spanning a broad range of industries, Rightpoint’s clients include marquee brands such as Aon, New Belgium Brewing, Exelon, Kellogg, and Jones Lang LaSalle.

“From Rightpoint’s inception eight years ago, the entire company has been on a rewarding entrepreneurial journey,” said Brad. “’Starting something from nothing’ is at the heart of how we operate as a company. Now more than ever, we are excited to continue to infuse the entrepreneurial spirit into the fabric of our culture. Rightpoint has never had more energy and momentum. We are just getting started on our entrepreneurial journey.”

Now in its 29th year, the program has honored the inspirational leadership of such entrepreneurs as Howard Schultz of Starbucks Coffee Company, Pierre Omidyar of eBay, Inc., and Mindy Grossman of HSN. Recent US national winners include Reid Hoffman and Jeff Weiner of LinkedIn; Hamdi Ulukaya, founder of Chobani; and 2014 winner Dr. David Hung, President and CEO and Chairman of Medivation.

As a Midwest award winner, Ross and Brad are now eligible for consideration for the Entrepreneur Of The Year 2015 national program. Award winners in several national categories, as well as the Entrepreneur Of The Year National Overall Award winner, will be announced at the annual awards gala in Palm Springs, California, on November 14, 2015. The awards are the culminating event of the EY Strategic Growth Forum®, the nation’s most prestigious gathering of high-growth, market-leading companies.

Sponsors

Founded and produced by EY, the Entrepreneur Of The Year Awards are sponsored nationally by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation and SAP America.

In the Midwest, program sponsors include: LaSalle Network, Benefitdecisions, PNC Bank, Merrill Corporation, Becker Professional Education, Smart Business, Cresa Chicago and 1871.

Company Boilerplate

About EY Entrepreneur Of The Year®

EY Entrepreneur Of The Year is the world’s most prestigious business award for entrepreneurs. The unique award makes a difference through the way it encourages entrepreneurial activity among those with potential and recognizes the contribution of people who inspire others with their vision, leadership and achievement. As the first and only truly global award of its kind, Entrepreneur Of The Year celebrates those who are building and leading successful, growing and dynamic businesses, recognizing them through regional, national and global awards programs in more than 145 cities in more than 60 countries.

About EY’s Strategic Growth Markets practice

EY’s Strategic Growth Markets (SGM) practice guides leading high-growth companies. Our multidisciplinary teams of elite professionals provide perspective and advice to help our clients accelerate market leadership. SGM delivers assurance, tax, transactions and advisory services to thousands of companies spanning all industries. EY is the undisputed leader in taking companies public, advising key government agencies on the issues impacting high-growth companies and convening the experts who shape the business climate. For more information, please visit us at ey.com/us/strategicgrowthmarkets, or follow news on Twitter @EY_Growth.

About EY

EY is a global leader in assurance, tax, transaction and advisory services. The insights and quality services we deliver help build trust and confidence in the capital markets and in economies the world over. We develop outstanding leaders who team to deliver on our promises to all of our stakeholders. In so doing, we play a critical role in building a better working world for our people, for our clients and for our communities.

EY refers to the global organization, and may refer to one or more, of the member firms of Ernst & Young Global Limited, each of which is a separate legal entity. Ernst & Young Global Limited, a UK company limited by guarantee, does not provide services to clients. For more information about our organization, please visit ey.com.

About Rightpoint

Rightpoint creates world-class digital solutions that drive profitable growth and sustainable competitive advantage for some of the world’s largest companies and most iconic brands. Driven by the firm’s passion for pragmatic thinking, Rightpoint’s business philosophy is to rethink the “typical” consulting model, combining attributes of management consulting, IT consulting, and creative agency services to help clients drive business results by solving strategic problems. Rightpoint’s breadth of services include digital strategy, mobile, social, cloud, CRM and application development. With a client base of more than 250 companies, Rightpoint was named to Forbes’ list of America’s Most Promising Companies in 2014 and Crain’s 50 Fastest Growing Companies in Chicago in 2014 and 2015. Rightpoint’s pervasive “intrapreneurial” spirit, which ensures that clients “get it right” the first time, is the foundation by which Rightpoint has built a strong, national reputation for excellence.






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