What’s behind VMware’s Wavefront acquisition?

VMware’s acquisition of monitoring software maker Wavefront for an undisclosed sum is a move core to VMware’s strategy to round out its portfolio for facilitating and managing hybrid cloud environments. It highlights in the need to ensure that applications running between private and public clouds perform up to par.

Companies undertaking digital transformations are leaning heavily on hybrid clouds to deploy software, a scenario playing out across nearly every industry. To enable this at a high velocity, companies are instituting DevOps, in which code is constantly written, shipped, run and regularly refined. In DevOps environments, corporate developers code application functionality, called microservices, which they ship via virtual containers to run between private cloud environments and public cloud systems such as Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: What’s with application monitoring? Another company picks up a monster funding round

An interesting thing is going on in the application and infrastructure monitoring space. A ton of money is being poured into the various vendors in the market, and all of those vendors are rapidly morphing their platforms to provide holistic monitoring functionality. No longer is it just about application monitoring or infrastructure monitoring in isolation. What is de rigueur today is combined monitoring that provides the often-talked about “single pane of glass” across all of an organizations assets.

+ Also on Network World: Infrastructure monitoring products: Users pinpoint the best and worst features +

It’s a fairly busy space—New Relic, DataDog, AppDynamics and a host of others compete. And to that list we must add Wavefront, a Silicon Valley company that recently scored an impressive $ 52 million by way of a Series B funding round. The company advises that their valuation increased four times compared to their Series A round—no down valuations for this player. It also scored top-shelf investors, existing investors Sequoia Capital and Sutter Hill Ventures were joined by new investor Tenaya Capital and other equity holders.

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Network World Cloud Computing

What’s better: Amazon’s Availability Zones vs. Microsoft Azure’s regions

Although they both offer core IaaS features like virtual machines, storage and databases the leading public cloud providers, Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure, take very different approaches in offering cloud services, including at the most basic level of how their data centers are constructed and positioned around the world.

+MORE FROM NETWORK WORLD: What’s behind the Amazon, Microsoft and Google’s aggressive cloud expansions? (With an interactive map!) +

Both companies’ clouds are made up of regions: AWS has 14 and Microsoft has 30. But those numbers aren’t quite an apples-to-apples comparison.

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Network World Cloud Computing

What’s WhatsApp’s desktop app? A bloated, pointless, Windows/Mac download, that’s what

Computerworld Cloud Computing

What’s going on at Citrix?

Tim Walsh, senior IT Architect at the Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant in Michigan, is a happy Citrix Systems customer. But he wasn’t surprised to learn this week that the company that makes most of its revenue from virtual client computing technologies is embarking on a major restructuring that will include spinning off of its GoTo Meeting family of collaboration products.

“I never really saw where the GoTo Meeting business fit into their virtualization strategy,” said Walsh, who manages a 2,000-user deployment of Citrix XenDesktop and Citrix XenApp, two of the market’s leading desktop and application virtualization products.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing