IDG Contributor Network: RackWare, like everyone, wants to manage hybrid clouds everywhere

RackWare offers a management and automation platform that enterprises use to manage their computing resources to more closely follow demand. RackWare’s core proposition is that its management suite delivers cost savings to customers of a suggested 40 to 50 percent. Additionally, RackWare promises to deliver the highest levels of performance and availability to their customers.

The company today released a new take on its management suite that aims to extend the existing core RackWare offering. The new platform promises to offer enterprises a single solution (they refrained from calling it a single pane of glass) to move applications, protect those same applications and manage all the different applications across the totality of their infrastructure. Justifying the move, RackWare points to a recent IDC report that suggests 70 percent of heavy cloud users are considering a hybrid cloud strategy.

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Network World Cloud

How IBM wants to bring blockchain from Bitcoin to your data center

At its InterConnect conference in Las Vegas this week, IBM is announcing new features for its open source cloud-hosted blockchain service in an attempt to bring this distributed database technology from its initial use of powering Bitcoin to a broader market, including the financial services industry.

Blockchain is a distributed database that maintains a continually growing list of records that can be verified using hashing techniques. Vendors such as IBM and Microsoft are attempting to commercialize it by offering customers a platform for hosting their own implementations. Analysts say the market to do so is just emerging.

IBM has supported blockchain implementations for more than a year, but this week the company is announcing a beta version 1.0 of its service, which is based off the open source Hyperledger Fabric – a Linux Foundation project. It’s available in IBM’s Bluemix Cloud. IBM says Hyperledger can process up to 1,000 transactions per second.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

How Cisco wants to become the Switzerland of the cloud

After years of juggling with different strategies of how to pursue the cloud computing market, Cisco now has what it believes will be a winning one: Become a so-called Switzerland of the cloud.

Cisco is not spending billions of dollars to build a public cloud to compete with Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud Platform. “That ship has sailed,” says Fabio Gori, head of cloud marketing at Cisco.

+MORE AT NETWORK WORLD: Cloud comparison Amazon Web Services vs. Microsoft Azure vs. Google Cloud Platform +

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: ZipBooks wants to shake up the accounting software market by helping customers collect cash

The accounting software industry is, contrary to what you might think, a pretty interesting place. Characterized by three large vendors that hold the lion’s share of the market in their respective geographies, until recently it has been a fairly sedentary place with Intuit (U.S.), Sage (U.K.) and MYOB (Australasia) happy to organically grow their businesses. That all changed around 10 years ago when Xero, a New Zealand-based startup, came on the scene and started taking well-aimed kicks at the three sleeping bears.

Since then, Xero has gone on to take significant market share in its home market of Australasia, pretty positive market share in the U.K., and is trying its hardest against a newly invigorated competitor to gain a toehold in the all-important U.S. market. That isn’t proving quite as easy as in Australasia and the U.K., due to some structural and competitive issues and also due to the fact that Intuit is doing a fantastic job (at last) of innovating and doing what it needs to do to keep market share.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Dropbox wants to stretch desktop file storage to infinity

Dropbox has a futuristic vision for how its users will be able to share massive files and have quick access to them on their computers, without their hard drives overflowing.

The cloud storage company announced a new initiative at its Open conference in London on Tuesday called Project Infinite. It’s a push to create a new Dropbox interface that allows users to see all of the files they’ve stored in the cloud in their computer’s file explorer without requiring them to keep local copies of each document, image, spreadsheet or other file. 

With Project Infinite, users will be able to manage their files in the cloud by moving them around inside the Mac OS X Finder or Windows File Explorer, just like they would any local files that are taking up space on their hard drives.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

This big-data startup wants to manage your data lake in the cloud

Big data may offer companies a world of untold potential, but realizing the benefits is typically no walk in the park. That’s why “big data as a service” platforms have begun to emerge, and it’s also why Bigstep is taking a like-minded approach to the increasingly common data lake.

Launched last year, U.K.-based Bigstep has been offering big data as a service through its Full Metal Cloud platform, which already includes compute instances, block storage and network components. Now, the Full Metal Data Lake extends that platform to include exabyte-scale storage for big-data workloads as well.

“Businesses today have access to infinite amounts of data but no fast, easy or cost-effective way to make sense of it,” said Flaviu Radulescu, Bigstep’s CEO.

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CIO Cloud Computing