IDG Contributor Network: Cloud security: Trends and strategy

Cloud computing can generate mixed feelings. Corporate leaders generally welcome technologies that produce efficiency, agility and speed. Cloud services deliver those benefits, yet many are concerned about security, even while being often uninformed about how widely the cloud is used within their own businesses.

Executives of large companies, for instance, tell us that they are holding back on the cloud because of security concerns. But when our professional services teams engage with them, we generate log files and find evidence of large numbers of cloud services the company’s employees are using every day.

It is easy to understand the disconnect. Consider a simple example: a director of HR, tasked with filling several critical positions as quickly and confidentially as possible, turns to a low-cost SaaS recruiting tool. Job descriptions, resumes, cover letters, job offers and other documents are shared and possibly uploaded to a third-party server. Soon enough, candidates arrive for interviews. Mission accomplished, thanks to an efficient cloud-based business tool, with the C-suite never needing to know all the details.

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CIO Cloud Computing

2016’s top trends in enterprise computing: Containers, bots, A.I. and more

It’s been a year of change in the enterprise software market. SaaS providers are fighting to compete with one another, machine learning is becoming a reality for businesses at a larger scale, and containers are growing in popularity.

Here are some of the top trends from 2016 that we’ll likely still be talking about next year.

Everybody’s a frenemy

As more companies adopt software-as-a-service products like Office 365, Slack and Box, there is increasing pressure for companies that compete with each another to collaborate. After all, nobody wants to be stuck using a service that doesn’t work with the other critical systems they have.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

5 tech trends that have Turing Award winners worried

Technology has considerable potential to make the world better, but those benefits are far from guaranteed. Plenty of downsides can pop up along the way, and some of them have Turing Award winners especially worried.

1. The internet echo chamber

“Technology by itself is not evil, but people can use it for bad things,” Barbara Liskov, an Institute Professor at MIT, told an audience of journalists Thursday at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum in Germany. “I do worry a lot about what’s going on.”

The ability to selectively filter out news and opinions that don’t agree with one’s own viewpoint is one of Liskov’s top concerns.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

5 tech trends that have Turing Award winners worried

Technology has considerable potential to make the world better, but those benefits are far from guaranteed. Plenty of downsides can pop up along the way, and some of them have Turing Award winners especially worried.

1. The internet echo chamber

“Technology by itself is not evil, but people can use it for bad things,” Barbara Liskov, an Institute Professor at MIT, told an audience of journalists Thursday at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum in Germany. “I do worry a lot about what’s going on.”

The ability to selectively filter out news and opinions that don’t agree with one’s own viewpoint is one of Liskov’s top concerns.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

5 tech trends that have Turing Award winners worried

Technology has considerable potential to make the world better, but those benefits are far from guaranteed. Plenty of downsides can pop up along the way, and some of them have Turing Award winners especially worried.

1. The internet echo chamber

“Technology by itself is not evil, but people can use it for bad things,” Barbara Liskov, an Institute Professor at MIT, told an audience of journalists Thursday at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum in Germany. “I do worry a lot about what’s going on.”

The ability to selectively filter out news and opinions that don’t agree with one’s own viewpoint is one of Liskov’s top concerns.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing