Microsoft consolidates its mobile management tools under Azure

Microsoft has consolidated its Enterprise Mobility + Security (EMS) suite of products under its Azure portal, combining its Intune mobile application management tools and its Azure Active Directory (AD) and Information Protection under a single console.

The move offers a unified admin experience aimed at bolstering enterprise mobility management efforts.

Microsoft introduced the EMS suite in March 2014, targeting businesses with strong mobile and cloud-first strategies.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Microsoft consolidates its mobile management tools under Azure

Microsoft has consolidated its Enterprise Mobility + Security (EMS) suite of products under its Azure portal, combining its Intune mobile application management tools and its Azure Active Directory (AD) and Information Protection under a single console.

The move offers a unified admin experience aimed at bolstering enterprise mobility management efforts.

Microsoft introduced the EMS suite in March 2014, targeting businesses with strong mobile and cloud-first strategies.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Microsoft’s new tools help devs manage cloud deployments on the go

Microsoft is making it easier for developers to manage their cloud deployments on the go, using a new mobile app and browser-based command line.

On Wednesday, the company unveiled Azure Cloud Shell, which lets developers spin up a full-fledged terminal environment inside Microsoft’s cloud and comes with a set of preconfigured tools for managing deployments. Each user will have persistent file storage in their Cloud Shell, hosted in Microsoft Azure.

Cloud Shells are accessible through the Microsoft Azure web portal, as well as the Azure mobile app for iOS and Android, which was just released Wednesday. That app also provides users with the ability to monitor the workloads they have running in Microsoft’s public cloud and perform basic management like stopping and restarting virtual machines.

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CIO Cloud Computing

IBM adds API tools to Bluemix serverless framework

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Heroku: PaaS is future of development tools

The mantra that all companies need to become software companies is starting to sound familiar. PaaS clouds are the key to making this happen, by providing the means to get customer-facing applications up and running quickly, Heroku CEO Adam Gross argued this week at a developer’s conference.

Gross said that even companies not known for producing software need to be as good at operating customer apps as Amazon, Facebook, or Google. “How are they going to absorb all that complexity and sophistication? It’s not going to be by starting at the bottom of the stack,” he said. Instead, a higher level of abstraction is needed.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Google upgrades G Suite with tools for IT pros

Google today bolstered its G Suite of productivity apps with new controls and tools for IT professionals. G Suite administrators now have more access to control security key enforcement, data control with data loss prevention (DLP) for Google Drive and Gmail, and additional insights by connecting Gmail to BigQuery, Google’s enterprise data warehouse designed to enable SQL queries, according to Google.

All of the changes, which are live today, are designed to elevate G Suite for the enterprise, especially among companies that need more confidence in the controls they can maintain over corporate data, according to Google.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

A.I. tools came out of the lab in 2016

You shouldn’t anthropomorphize computers: They don’t like it.

That joke is at least as old as Deep Blue’s 1997 victory over then world chess champion Garry Kasparov, but even with the great strides made in the field of artificial intelligence over that time, we’re still not much closer to having to worry about computers’ feelings.

Computers can analyze the sentiments we express in social media, and project expressions on the face of robots to make us believe they are happy or angry, but no one seriously believes, yet, that they “have” feelings, that they can experience them.

Other areas of A.I., on the other hand, have seen some impressive advances in both hardware and software in just the last 12 months.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

AI tools came out of the lab in 2016

You shouldn’t anthropomorphize computers: They don’t like it.

That joke is at least as old as Deep Blue’s 1997 victory over then world chess champion Garry Kasparov, but even with the great strides made in the field of artificial intelligence over that time, we’re still not much closer to having to worry about computers’ feelings.

Computers can analyze the sentiments we express in social media, and project expressions on the face of robots to make us believe they are happy or angry, but no one seriously believes, yet, that they “have” feelings, that they can experience them.

Other areas of AI, on the other hand, have seen some impressive advances in both hardware and software in just the last 12 months.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Microsoft is working on tools to help people use cloud-based FPGAs

Earlier this year, Microsoft made a splash at its Ignite conference for IT professionals when it announced that it has been racking cards of programmable chips together with servers in its cloud data centers.

The chips, called field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), can be reconfigured after being deployed to optimize them for particular applications such as networking and machine learning.

Now, Microsoft is investing in tools that would allow customers to program the FPGAs, said Scott Guthrie, the executive vice president in charge of Microsoft’s cloud and enterprise division, during a talk at the Structure conference in San Francisco.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

9 top tools for corporate cloud collaboration

The nature of work has evolved rapidly during the last few years. Modern coworkers often have very different roles and responsibilities, and many work from multiple locations. Email is no longer an efficient tool for many of the tasks today’s professionals perform, and face-to-face meetings are increasingly a rarity.

Fortunately, a new generation of cloud-based collaboration tools are now available to help tackle some of these challenges. Here’s a look at nine of the best options.

1. Toggl for time tracking

If you’ve been turned off by the complexity of past time-tracking solutions, Toggl may be a better fit. The great-looking time tracker works in a web browser, and it’s an intuitive tool that helps monitor your productivity. Toggl works offline, too, and it automatically syncs time tracked offline the next time it connects to the web.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Microsoft expands cloud management licensing to include on-premises tools too

Microsoft Monday announced that customers can now purchase a joint licensing agreement for its cloud-based Operations Management Suite and its on-premises System Center infrastructure manager.

Packaging these separate but related management platforms will encourage customers to use public cloud resources and make it easier to manage hybrid clouds.

+MORE AT NETWORK WORLD: Why Brexit could be a data management headache for US companies | Microsoft appears to be building a business app marketplace +

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Network World Cloud Computing

Dropbox enhances its productivity tools across the board

Dropbox just dumped a ton of new productivity features on users of its file storage and collaboration service that are all aimed at making it easier for people to get work done within its applications. 

Updates to the Dropbox app for iOS allow users to scan documents directly into the cloud storage service, and get started with creating Microsoft Office files from that app as well. The company also increased the ease and security of sharing files through Dropbox, and made it easier to preview and comment on files shared through the service.

These launches mean that Dropbox will be more valuable to people as a productivity service, and not just a folder to hold files. It’s especially important as the company tries to capture the interest of business users, who have a wide variety of competing storage services they could subscribe to instead. 

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Salesforce targets ‘citizen developers’ with new tools and training

If there’s an overriding trend in the world of enterprise software lately, it’s democratization, as tools previously reserved for experts are put in the hands of average users. On Tuesday, Salesforce.com climbed on board with new software, training and support services that aim to help more users — not just professional developers — build applications for the Salesforce platform.

There aren’t enough trained developers to create apps for the business world, the company says, so it wants to help users in all parts of the organization make their own. More than 2.8 million developers have already built some 5.5 million apps based on the company’s customer relationship management software, it says, and at its TrailheaDX developer event in San Francisco, it made several announcements to expand that further.

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CIO Cloud Computing