IDG Contributor Network: Accelerating Organizational Velocity through a Data Center Autopilot

Understanding the impact of the data center autopilot

Current state of the art and my disappointment with traditional databases aside, I mentioned in my comments last week that the data center autopilot will have big consequences. It seems to me that there is not enough recognition of the likely impact. The tactical observations are that automation will reduce people costs, at least on a per-workload basis, and that automation will:

  • Minimize over-provisioning,
  • Help reduce downtime,
  • Help to manage SLAs, and
  • Improve transparency, governance, auditing and accounting.

That is all true, but it’s not the big story: The overall strategic impact is to significantly accelerate organizational velocity. The acceleration is partly as a result of the above efficiencies, but much more importantly as a consequence of automated decisions being made and implemented orders-of-magnitude faster than manual decisions can be. Aviation autopilots do things that human pilots are not fast enough to do. They are used to stabilize deliberately unstable aircraft such as the Lockheed F-117 Nighthawk at millisecond timescales, and deliver shorter flight times by constantly monitoring hundreds of sensors in real time and optimally exploiting jetstreams.

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CIO Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Xero breaks through its glass ceiling: customers, revenue and cashflow

It’s fair to say that no one has been covering Xero longer than I have. I first talked to its co-founder and CEO, Rod Drury, long before the company launched a product. Trawling back through my emails and I discovered that we first talked about his vision 10 years ago to the day. (Rod, we really should have a celebratory beer!) I can’t imagine he’ll be celebrating the milestone, but it does go to show just how long Drury has been on this journey.

When it was founded, Xero took a very unusual path, listing on the New Zealand Stock Exchange before it even had a real product and customers. Backed by some high-profile names, and with Drury’s masterful marketing execution, Xero got its IPO away in the nick of time, just before the GFC really took its hold.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Gain access to an ARM server running Linux OS, through the cloud

If you want to play with an ARM-based server, you can now apply to gain access to one online through the Linaro Developer Cloud.

The cloud service was announced in March but has finally gone live. It’s mainly targeted at developers who want to evaluate ARM servers.

The free service is one way to access ARM servers, which aren’t widely available. Applications go through an approval process, and only those serious about programming for ARM servers will likely be approved.

Developers will get remote access to bare-metal servers with ARM processors. Linaro has said servers will have ARM-based chips from Qualcomm, Cavium, and Huawei, and users will be able to select specific hardware.

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Network World Cloud Computing