5 Things to Know About Nintendo’s Super Mario Odyssey

The biggest Mario game in a long time.

Nintendo’s latest game Super Mario Odyssey is launching in a big way.

Starting on Friday, game lovers around the globe will have the opportunity to buy the latest Nintendo NTDOY game, Super Mario Odyssey. As its name suggests, the title centers on the iconic Mario character, and gives you the opportunity to enter a virtual world with your protagonist and explore it at your leisure. And as always, you’ll be chasing the antagonist Bowser around the world in hopes of saving Princess Peach, who has been kidnapped.

But is Super Mario Odyssey worth buying? And should you spend this weekend exploring its vast world?

Read on for the key things you should know about Super Mario Odyssey before you plunk down $ 60 on the game.

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What Is Super Mario Odyssey?

Super Mario Odyssey is the latest installment in the famed Mario franchise. The game is an open world title that allows you to explore the world and enter levels to take on enemies and collect Moons that “power” the Odyssey, a spaceship that gets you around.

Super Mario Odyssey puts you in the place of Mario, who is aiming at saving Princess Peach, who has been kidnapped by the evil Bowser. It’s a tired concept, of course, but Nintendo apparently feels it’s still going to appeal to gamers.

Where Can I Play the Game?

If you’re hoping to play Super Mario Odyssey on the game console of your choice, you’re out of luck. The game is available exclusively on the game company’s Nintendo Switch console.

What Are the Reviewers Saying?

So, Super Mario Odyssey might just be one of the best games ever released, and is the highest-rated game on the Nintendo Switch.

According to MetaCritic, a site that collects reviewers scores, Super Mario Odyssey has attracted an average score of 97 out of a possible 100.

What Makes Super Mario Odyssey Different From Recent Games?

Super Mario Odyssey is the spiritual successor to Super Mario 64, a game that was released on the Nintendo 64 in 1996, and Super Mario Sunshine, a popular title released in 2002 on the GameCube.

That’s because Super Mario Odyssey is an open-world adventure game that lets players explore wherever they’d like. It also includes various levels inside worlds that offer full, 3D gaming.

Nintendo has released Mario games in recent years, but they’ve mainly been 2D adventures like the Super Mario games of old.

OK, So How Do I Buy It?

Sold on Super Mario Odyssey?

If you’re looking to get your hands on the game, it’ll be available starting on Friday, October 27.

Most major retailers, including GameStop GME , Best Buy BBY , and Amazon AMZN , will all start selling the game on Friday. Nintendo Switch owners can also buy a digital version directly on the console.

Both physical disc and digital Super Mario Odyssey versions will cost $ 60.

Tech

The 3 dumbest things enterprises do in the cloud

You’re going to make mistakes. I tell my enterprise clients that every week.

However, there are mistakes and there are mistakes that are more like self-inflected wounds. Here are three of the dumbest mistakes I’m now seeing enterprises make in the cloud efforts.

Dumbest mistake No. 1: Keeping the data on premises but the compute in the cloud

When helping clients plan their cloud efforts, I regularly hear, “My data is sacred, so we don’t want to put our data in the cloud. However, we’re paying too much for compute and datacenter space, so let’s place that on some public cloud.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

The 3 dumbest things enterprises do in the cloud

You’re going to make mistakes. I tell my enterprise clients that every week.

However, there are mistakes and there are mistakes that are more like self-inflected wounds. Here are three of the dumbest mistakes I’m now seeing enterprises make in the cloud efforts.

Dumbest mistake No. 1: Keeping the data on premises but the compute in the cloud

When helping clients plan their cloud efforts, I regularly hear, “My data is sacred, so we don’t want to put our data in the cloud. However, we’re paying too much for compute and datacenter space, so let’s place that on some public cloud.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

The 3 dumbest things enterprises do in the cloud

You’re going to make mistakes. I tell my enterprise clients that every week.

However, there are mistakes and there are mistakes that are more like self-inflected wounds. Here are three of the dumbest mistakes I’m now seeing enterprises make in the cloud efforts.

Dumbest mistake No. 1: Keeping the data on premises but the compute in the cloud

When helping clients plan their cloud efforts, I regularly hear, “My data is sacred, so we don’t want to put our data in the cloud. However, we’re paying too much for compute and datacenter space, so let’s place that on some public cloud.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

3 little things in Linux 4.10 that will make a big difference

Linux never sleeps. Linus Torvalds is already hard at work pulling together changes for the next version of the kernel (4.11). But with Linux 4.10 now out, three groups of changes are worth paying close attention to because they improve performance and enable feature sets that weren’t possible before on Linux.

Here’s a rundown of those changes to 4.10 and what they likely will mean for you, your cloud providers, and your Linux applications.

1. Virtualized GPUs

One class of hardware that’s always been difficult to emulate in virtual machines is GPUs. Typically, VMs provide their own custom video driver (slow), and graphics calls have to be translated (slow) back and forth between guest and host. The ideal solution would be to run the same graphics driver in a guest that you use on the host itself and have all the needed calls simply relayed back to the GPU.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Five things AIs can do better than us

For millennia, we surpassed the other intelligent species with which we share our planet — dolphins, porpoises, orangutans, and the like — in almost all skills, bar swimming and tree-climbing.

In recent years, though, our species has created new forms of intelligence, able to outperform us in other ways. One of the most famous of these artificial intelligences (AIs) is AlphaGo, developed by Deepmind. In just a few years, it has learned to play the 4,000-year-old strategy game, Go, beating two of the world’s strongest players.

Other software developed by Deepmind has learned to play classic eight-bit video games, notably Breakout, in which players must use a bat to hit a ball at a wall, knocking bricks out of it. CEO Demis Hassabis is fond of saying that the software figured out how to beat the game purely from the pixels on the screen, often glossing over the fact that the company first taught it how to count and how to read the on-screen score, and gave it the explicit goal of maximizing that score. Even the smartest AIs need a few hints about our social mores. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

5 things you should know about blockchains

Talk of blockchain technology is everywhere, it seems — but what is it, and what does it do?

1. Don’t call it “the” blockchain

The first thing to know about the blockchain is, there isn’t one: there are many. Blockchains are distributed, tamper-proof public ledgers of transactions. The most well-known is the record of bitcoin transactions, but in addition to tracking cryptocurrencies, blockchains are being used to record loans, stock transfers, contracts, healthcare data, and even votes.

2. Security, transparency: the network’s run by us

There’s no central authority in a blockchain system: Participating computers exchange transactions for inclusion in the ledger they share over a peer-to-peer network. Each node in the chain keeps a copy of the ledger, and can trust others’ copies of it because of the way they are signed. Periodically, they wrap up the latest transactions in a new block of data to be added to the chain. Alongside the transaction data, each block contains a computational “hash” of itself and of the previous block in the chain.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

5 things to expect from Microsoft’s Build developer conference

Microsoft executives will take the stage at Moscone West in San Francisco on Wednesday for the first of two keynote addresses to the company’s big Build developer conference. Here are five key things to expect from the next two days of Microsoft announcements:

1. New features in Windows 10 for developers and end users alike

Last year, Microsoft used Build to show off its vision for developing applications to run on what was then an unreleased operating system. In the intervening year, the company released Windows 10 to the world, and people have started using it in droves.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

10 things you don’t need to worry about in 2016

Life is tough, then you die, so please enjoy Arby’s. In the meantime, why worry?

Kidding! We all know there’s plenty to worry about. So as my annual public service, I offer you you 10 things you definitely don’t need to worry about in 2016. This year, as a bonus, I’ve tacked on a report card assessing last year’s predictions.

1. The Dell-EMC merger

Big mergers take time. However, this is a merger of the walking dead in the era of containers, cloud, and cheap SSDs. The next generation of large data centers uses something that looks more like local storage and distributed file systems. If this trend catches on in corporate environments, EMC’s main SAN business is in trouble. With increased reliance on cloud and centralization, there’s less reason to fill stacks of servers in little corporate data centers around the country.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Kii introduces its Thing Interaction Framework to simplify and speed up Internet of Things development

Internet of Things Kii introduces its Thing Interaction Framework to simplify and speed up Internet of Things developmentKii has announced the availability of its new platform functionality, Thing Interaction Framework, which allows IoT solutions developers to simplify and speed up the development of both business/industrial and consumer-focused IoT solutions. 

An extension of the Kii Cloud, the new framework specifically focuses on common IoT use cases around sensor-cloud-app interactions (like sensor state registration/retrieval, trigger-driven command execution on devices, etc.) and significantly reduces server code that would otherwise be needed to implement them.

This enhancement incorporates a number of best practices involved in implementing interactions between the various moving parts in a typical IoT solution – like devices, services, apps, states, commands, triggers, etc. Thing (sensor/device) manufacturers and mobile app developers can adapt and customize the framework through new and updated SDKs.

“Thing Interaction Framework extends Kii’s commitment to simplify and speed up IoT solution development,” explains Phani Pandrangi, Chief Product Officer at Kii. “With this framework providing most of the server side functionality pre-packaged (yet customizable) for a variety of use cases, our customers can focus on the specifics of their solution and implement complex interactions with mostly client side coding.”

This framework also facilitates interoperability between different IoT solutions. The abstraction provided by the framework exposes clean interfaces to the state data, actions, commands and triggers of sensors/devices, thereby making creation of interoperability logic easier and more modular than ever before.

Thing Interaction Framework is available now to customers, more information at: http://documentation.kii.com/en/guides/thingifsdk/.


CloudTimes

IDG Contributor Network: Drones are part of the Internet of Things, drone maker says

We can thank a guy named Todd Harper, who managed to successfully capture foot-cam videos of 3D Robotics’ chief Chris Anderson giving the keynote speech at the InterDrone show earlier this month and put them on YouTube (Parts One and Two). 

InterDrone is a conference and drone expo. 3D Robotics, or 3DR as it’s sometimes called, is major drone maker, with some of its funding from Qualcomm.

I’ve written about Qualcomm’s recent drone chip development in “Intel, Qualcomm getting into drones.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

Cisco New Intercloud Services Focus on Next Generation Internet of Things Market

Cisco Intercloud1 300x183 Cisco New Intercloud Services Focus on Next Generation Internet of Things MarketThe initiative of Cisco Intercloud, a worldwide network consisting of interconnected clouds that the corporation is building along with its partners, has grown now. The networking giant announced significant developments in the Intercloud initiative, which aims to connect the hybrid cloud to being part of a large available and accessible network from anywhere.

During this year’s Cisco Live! and media level, the Intercloud initiative has been overtaken undoubtedly the concept of Internet of Everything. However, for the manufacturer it is a vital part of the technology that will develop the connection of all things, data collection, and processing.

Cisco also announced the addition of 35 new members to accelerate the creation of innovative cloud-based services through three fundamental areas -Platforms development of next-generation analytics and big data and cloud services for the Internet of Everything. The company has also optimized its Cisco Intercloud Fabric solution with new security features, support management in clouds and additional hypervisor. These innovations further eliminate the complexity of hybrid cloud providing flexible movement of workloads and maintaining security policies and network environments through public and private cloud.

Cloud services for the Internet of Things

Cisco and its partners offer organizations’ cloud services and next-generation applications through the Cisco Intercloud Marketplace, a global market focused on partners that Cisco plans to open this fall. Developers are going to rely on the Cloud for development environments/test to create and distribute applications in production. Cisco announced its collaboration with various companies developing and delivering business applications such as Apprenda, Active State and Docker for innovative development environments.

Cisco is also expanding its participation in major open source development communities such as Cloud Foundry, OpenShift, and kubernetes, and is now building an integrated suite to help developers design micro-container based services tools.

Organizations are demanding new ways to manage the exponential growth of data and the ability to obtain real-time analysis. To meet this need, Cisco collaborates with leading Big Data solutions such as MapR, Hortonworks, Cloudera and Apache Hadoop community. Working with these partners, Cisco safely extends Hadoop solutions on-premise to the cloud and provide a true hybrid deployment. It is also providing end customers to maintain the same policies, control and security in their Big Data implementations, as well as greater flexibility and an unlimited virtual scalability.

In addition to developing platforms and powerful features of Big Data and analytics necessary to the IEA, Cisco started providing APIs to the development community to ensure functionality control, performance and security from the data center to the device.

As part of this framework, Cisco will expose APIs for application developers to allow network monitoring, performance and security to be delivered from the data center to the device. It will also be offering vital services such as data virtualization, Energywise, and Cisco Exchange Platform Services through Intercloud.

Cisco says that by 2020 there will be over 50 billion devices connected to the Internet. Cisco is working on a number of fronts to turn IoT’s many, many possibilities into reality. Cisco’s strategy to invest in solutions of hybrid data centers, including Intercloud and fog computing to create an optimized IoT infrastructure.


CloudTimes

SAP HANA Dresses for Internet of Things and Predictive Analytics

saphana 300x95 SAP HANA Dresses for Internet of Things and Predictive AnalyticsInternet of Things is a new and hot territory today. In last few weeks, Google has demonstrated its interest in the IoT market with project Brillo, a project to connect any device used, not only smartphones, tablets, computers and smartwatch, but also those that are part of everyday life such as home appliances, cars, surveillance systems etc. Cisco also announced the addition of 35 new members and new Intercloud initiative for the Internet of Everything market.

Now, SAP plans to offer companies better tools for big data and the Internet of Things. The latest version of SAP HANA called Service Pack 10 (SPS 10) allows customers to communicate with objects connected to the scale of the business and more efficiently manage large amounts of data. The function of synchronization of remote data, which can synchronize the data between the enterprise and remote sites to the network edge, is one of the most notable innovations in the new version.

Developers can now build IoT Mobile apps and generate large volumes of data that take advantage of the data synchronization distance between the company, and Hana remote locations via the integrated SAP database embedded SQL Anywhere technology. So some data previously scattered in various production areas such as restaurants, and remote locations such as gas stations, vending products, and other sources can be traced, be accessible and re-injected more easily.

This concerns the applications of the Internet of Things, for example, the analysis of data from sensors in the field to better plan preventive maintenance actions that avoid the occurrence of faults. Moreover, the extensive capabilities of integrating Hana data is compatible with the latest Hadoop distribution Cloudera and Hortonworks. Among other remarkable features are the faster data transfer with Spark SQL and the ability to move data between storage tiers.

The opening up to the IoT not only about SAP SQL Anywhere. HANA sees improved other related functions such as streaming data from thousands of sensors in the field and their peaks of transmissions. There is also an architecture IoT layered in which some devices are the gateway and pre-process the events of their area to a deputy before transferring the data to HANA.

Also, SAP expanded language support for the Texanalyse to 32 languages. The SAP HANA text mining now supports SQL syntax. Thus, it will easier for developers to write new applications based on text mining.

SAP has also evolved the analysis capabilities of its software, not just in the core of its Hana platform, but also in its predictive analytics portfolio. For example, version 2.2 of the SAP Predictive Analytics suite has been modified to accommodate large data sets that can be used for predictive modeling.

Its automatic predictive library has been enriched by a large number of algorithms. Other more oriented enhancements such as integration of R model comparison capabilities are also included in the new additions.

In March, IBM announced investment of $ 3 billion to set up a new dedicated business unit for Internet of Things. The new offer is initially aimed at companies with tourism market, logistics, insurance, public services, transport and retail. Samsung also announced the launch of SmartThings Open Cloud and Artik platform, which will help developers create innovative products and services for the IoT using their connected devices.


CloudTimes