3 takeaways from Red Hat’s AWS deal for OpenShift

Red Hat and Amazon have long been framed as rivals, but only in the sense that anyone who provides on-prem Linux and PaaS products competes to some degree with a cloud provider. Really, they’re more like peanut butter and jelly.

Yesterday, Red Hat unveiled details about a new partnership with Amazon to support integrating some widely used AWS options into Red Hat’s OpenShift PaaS. The list of services covers basic infrastructure (AWS Route 53, AWS Cloudfront), data (AWS Redshift/Aurora/Athena), and cutting-edge technologies (AWS Lambda).

Here are three reasons why offering those services with OpenShift is big for Red Hat and its customers—and how it could potentially be big for other cloud vendors too.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

3 no-bull takeaways about Google buying Apigee

From the outside, Google picking up API management outfit Apigee doesn’t seem like a high-profile acquisition. But it may turn out to be strategically important, as APIs drive the enterprise IT Google wants to make a major part of its business.

Here are three key insights into what Apigee will mean for Google, its own enterprise customers, and Apigee’s existing user base.

1. APIs matter more than ever to Google and its users

This goes beyond plugging into Google’s public APIs for their services; everyone’s been doing that for years. Applications created by businesses — running in their private clouds, in hybrid environments, and in public clouds like Google’s — are becoming API-driven affairs by necessity. An app without an API is like a car with no dashboard and maybe no steering wheel either.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

4 no-bull takeaways about Docker Cloud

Late last year, Docker snapped up cross-cloud container management service Tutum, but it wasn’t clear how the acquired company’s handiwork would manifest under the Docker brand.

Earlier this week, we found out: Tutum reemerged as Docker Cloud amid little fanfare, but with more than only the badges swapped on the product. Cloud now cross-integrates with all of Docker’s other services, and Docker promises to unveil more features for shortly.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing