Stay proactive to maintain peak cloud performance

There is an expectation of performance in the cloud, then there is actual cloud performance. In many cases, they don’t match. Why?

Most platforms, public clouds included, provide good performance at the outset. But over time, databases get bigger, applications grow more complex, and the platforms themselves become harder to manage. The result is much poorer performance.

First, let’s understand the factors in play. Most cloud-based platforms, such as a virtual Linux server, work exactly like the physical server you had down the hall for the last 15 years. If they aren’t configured and managed properly, they slow down exactly like your aging PCs and servers.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: When the Big One hits Seattle, will cloud providers stay on?

The San Andreas Fault gets all the attention, media coverage and movies, but it’s not the fault line the tech sector needs to worry about. A much bigger problem lies to the north, and some of the most important tech firms are directly in its crosshairs.

The Cascadia subduction zone runs north-south from Canada to northern California and sits roughly 80 miles offshore. That’s the good news, since it’s 80 miles out to sea, as opposed to the San Andreas and Hayward faults, which run right through the Silicon Valley and East Bay, respectively.

The bad news is it is capable of a much more severe quake. The Cascadia fault is believed to be capable of a 9.4 magnitude quake. Residents of the Pacific Northwest got quite a fright last year when The New Yorker published an article called “The Really Big One,” which detailed the potential of a 9.4 magnitude earthquake hitting the area. The article outlined projections for 13,000 immediate deaths, one million left homeless, and the whole region left without power and water for months.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: When the Big One hits Seattle, will cloud providers stay on?

The San Andreas Fault gets all the attention, media coverage and movies, but it’s not the fault line the tech sector needs to worry about. A much bigger problem lies to the north, and some of the most important tech firms are directly in its crosshairs.

The Cascadia subduction zone runs north-south from Canada to northern California and sits roughly 80 miles offshore. That’s the good news, since it’s 80 miles out to sea, as opposed to the San Andreas and Hayward faults, which run right through the Silicon Valley and East Bay, respectively.

The bad news is it is capable of a much more severe quake. The Cascadia fault is believed to be capable of a 9.4 magnitude quake. Residents of the Pacific Northwest got quite a fright last year when The New Yorker published an article called “The Really Big One,” which detailed the potential of a 9.4 magnitude earthquake hitting the area. The article outlined projections for 13,000 immediate deaths, one million left homeless, and the whole region left without power and water for months.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: When the Big One hits Seattle, will cloud providers stay on?

The San Andreas Fault gets all the attention, media coverage and movies, but it’s not the fault line the tech sector needs to worry about. A much bigger problem lies to the north, and some of the most important tech firms are directly in its crosshairs.

The Cascadia subduction zone runs north-south from Canada to northern California and sits roughly 80 miles offshore. That’s the good news, since it’s 80 miles out to sea, as opposed to the San Andreas and Hayward faults, which run right through the Silicon Valley and East Bay, respectively.

The bad news is it is capable of a much more severe quake. The Cascadia fault is believed to be capable of a 9.4 magnitude quake. Residents of the Pacific Northwest got quite a fright last year when The New Yorker published an article called “The Really Big One,” which detailed the potential of a 9.4 magnitude earthquake hitting the area. The article outlined projections for 13,000 immediate deaths, one million left homeless, and the whole region left without power and water for months.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing