Microsoft’s revenue falls, but cloud remains a bright spot

Microsoft is betting on reinventing itself as a cloud company, and the financial results it released Thursday show that its push is paying off despite an overall decline in revenue. 

Azure revenue rose 127 percent from a year earlier, and sales of Azure Premium Services like Machine Learning were three times higher during the last quarter of 2015 than in the same period of 2014. (Not counting the effects of currency exchange rates.) The company also bragged that more than one-third of the Fortune 500 is using its Enterprise Mobility solutions, which make it easier to secure devices that a company controls. 

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Network World Cloud Computing

Microsoft’s revenue falls, but cloud remains a bright spot

Microsoft is betting on reinventing itself as a cloud company, and the financial results it released Thursday show that its push is paying off despite an overall decline in revenue. 

Azure revenue rose 127 percent from a year earlier, and sales of Azure Premium Services like Machine Learning were three times higher during the last quarter of 2015 than in the same period of 2014. (Not counting the effects of currency exchange rates.) The company also bragged that more than one-third of the Fortune 500 is using its Enterprise Mobility solutions, which make it easier to secure devices that a company controls. 

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CIO Cloud Computing

Is the cloud the right spot for your big data?

Is the cloud a good spot for big data?

That’s a controversial question, and the answer changes depending on who you ask.

Last week I attended the HP Big Data Conference in Boston and both an HP customer and an executive told me that big data isn’t a good fit for the public cloud.

I’ve heard many cloud vendors tell me the opposite.

+MORE AT NETWORK WORLD: Why big data will be a big deal for the new HP +

CB Bohn is a senior database engineer at Etsy, and a user of HP’s Vertica database. The online marketplace uses the public cloud for some workloads, but its primary functions are run out of a co-location center, Bohn said. It doesn’t make sense for the company to lift and shift its Postgres, Vertica SQL and Hadoop workloads into the public cloud, he said. It would be a massive undertaking for the company to port all the data associated with those programs into the cloud. Then, once its transferred to the cloud, the company would have to pay ongoing costs to store it there. Meanwhile, the company has a co-lo facility already set up and expertise in house to manage the infrastructure required to run those programs. The cloud just isn’t a good fit for Etsy’s big data, Bohn says.

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Network World Cloud Computing