Microsoft will cut OneDrive and Skype access to standalone Office users

When Microsoft launched Office 365 in 2010, Microsoft officials said then that customers were asking to move to the cloud. Beginning in 2020, some Office customers will need to buy an Office 365 subscription to do so.

In an update to Microsoft’s Office 365 system requirements released today, Microsoft said that consumers who have already purchased “perpetual”—i.e., standalone—versions of Office, such as Office 2010, Office 2013, and Office 2016, would be cut off from accessing the business versions of OneDrive and Skype after mainstream support expires. Those who have purchased those Office suites will be allowed to connect until Oct. 13, 2020—the day mainstream support ends for Office 2016, and the day the new support policy kicks in. 

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Skype Teams desperately needs this feature if it has a chance to beat Slack

Unconfirmed rumors about Microsoft working hard on a team collaboration app called Skype Teams are running rampant. (Microsoft did not provide substantiation.) PC World has called Skype Teams a “Slack killer” and a report from MSPoweruser explains some of the features.

Yet, even if the product exists (and augments the more enterprise-oriented Yammer app owned by Microsoft), it will need to provide some innovative new features for group collaboration. The biggest one that’s missing today? It’s all over Reddit, it’s in some email apps, and it’s even in some comment threads including the one at Computerworld.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

How illogical: New Skype bot lets you chat with Spock

Microsoft has made no secret of its grand plans for chat bots, and this week it rolled out five new ones for Skype. Surely the most fun is “Spock,” a bot that promises to help you “learn the ways of Vulcan logic.”

Back in April, Microsoft debuted a preview of Skype bots, the artificial intelligence-based helpers it hopes will make it easier for users to get things done. Today, more than 30,000 developers are building bots for Skype, it says.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing