Facebook Friends With Your Co-Workers? Survey Shows Your Boss Probably Disapproves

You and your colleagues pitch in together on difficult projects, lunch together, and have drinks together after work. You probably think it’s the most natural thing in the world to friend them on Facebook or follow them on Twitter or Instagram. Your boss, though, probably thinks you shouldn’t.

That’s the surprising result of a survey of 1,006 employees and 307 senior managers conducted by staffing company OfficeTeam. Survey respondents were asked how appropriate it was to connect with co-workers on various social media platforms. It turns out that bosses and their employees have very different answers to this question.

When it comes to Facebook, 77 percent of employees thought it was either “very appropriate” or “somewhat appropriate” to be Facebook friends with your work colleagues, but only 49 percent of senior managers agreed. That disagreement carries over to other social media platforms. Sixty-one percent of employees thought it was fine to follow a co-worker on Twitter, but only 34 percent of bosses agreed. With Instagram, 56 percent of employees, but only 30 percent of bosses thought following a co-worker was appropriate. Interestingly, the one social platform bosses and employees seem to almost agree about is Snapchat, with 34 percent of employees thinking it was fine to connect with colleagues, and 26 percent of bosses thinking so too.

What should you do if you want to connect with a colleague on social media–if you get a connection request from a colleague? Here are a few options:

1. Use LinkedIn.

LinkedIn was not included in the OfficeTeam survey, but because it’s a professional networking tool, few bosses will object to you connecting with coworkers there. And LinkedIn has many of the same features as Facebook–you can even send instant messages to your contacts.

2. Keep your social media connections secret.

Most social networks give users the option to limit who can see what they post and who their other connections are. You can use this option to keep your social media interactions limited to the people you choose. If that doesn’t include your boss, he or she may never know that you and your co-workers are connected.

3. Talk to your boss.

He or she may not agree with the surveyed bosses who said connecting on social media was inappropriate, in which case there’s no problem. And if your boss does object, he or she may have some good reasons you hadn’t thought of to keep your professional life separate from your social media one. The only way to find out is to ask.

4. Consider the future.

It may be perfectly fine to connect with your co-workers on social media when you’re colleagues. But what happens if you get promoted to a leadership position? You may regret giving your former co-workers access to all the thoughts you share on Facebook or Twitter. So if a colleague sends you a social media request, or you want to make one yourself, take a moment to think it through. Will you be sorry one day–when you’re the boss yourself?

Tech

Latest Apple Park Drone Footage Shows Basketball and Tennis Courts

Apple’s new campus is nearing completion.

Apple employees will be able to shoot hoops and play tennis at the company’s new Apple Park headquarters.

Aerial videographer Matthew Roberts released new drone footage Monday of Apple’s new headquarters, spanning 175 acres in Cupertino, Calif.

The drone footage shows some overhead shots of the nearly-finished campus, with several up-close shots of the massive 2.8 million spherical building serving as Apple Park’s centerpiece, where employees will be working. The video also shows new paved paths that crisscross throughout the campus, while big trucks are shown to be transporting trees to their designated planting areas.

Get Data Sheet, Fortune’s technology newsletter.

Apple aapl is also installing two big basketball and tennis courts for employees to use during their spare time. The courts however, appear to be unfinished as of when the video was recording, depicting a few massive empty lots for the time being.

In September, drone pilot Duncan Sinfield recorded aerial footage of Apple Park in prelude to the company’s latest iPhone launch.

Sinfield’s footage also featured Apple’s new auditorium, the Steve Jobs Theater, where Apple recently held its big media event and unveiled the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X, among other products.

Tech

The SEC Hack Shows That Not Even Top Government Data Is Safe

A major computer hack at America’s top stock market regulator is the latest sign that data stored in the highest reaches of the U.S. government remains vulnerable to cyber attacks, despite efforts across multiple presidencies to limit high-profile breaches that are so frequent many consider them routine.

In recent years, nation-state and criminal hackers, as well as rogue employees, have stolen data from the Internal Revenue Service, the State Department and intelligence agencies, including millions of government employee files allegedly exfiltrated by the Chinese military, U.S. officials say.

The Sec urities and Exchange Commission ( SEC ), America’s chief stock market regulator, said on Wednesday that cyber criminals may have used data stolen last year to make money in the stock market, making it the latest federal agency to grab headlines for losing control of its data.

Related

JAPAN-US-IT-FINANCE-BITCOIN -COMPUTERS-HACKING-SERVICES-BANKING

At the same time, being only the latest major breach is not special, said Dan Guido, chief executive of Trail of Bits, which does cyber sec urity consulting for the U.S. government.

“It simply reflects the status quo of our digital sec urity,” said Guido, who is a former member of the cyber sec urity team at the Federal Reserve, America’s central bank.

Central bank officials have detected dozens of cases of cyber breaches, including several in 2012 that were described internally as “espionage.”

The U.S. federal government has sharply increased funding dedicated to protecting its own digital systems over the last several years, attempting to counter what is widely viewed as a worsening national sec urity liability.

But as one of the world’s largest collectors of sensitive information, America’s federal government is a major target for hackers from both the private sec tor and foreign governments.

“When you have one central repository for all this information – man, that’s a target,” said Republican Representative Bill Huizenga, chairman of the House subcommittee on Capital Markets, Sec urities, and Investment, which oversees the SEC .

Last year, U.S. federal, state and local government agencies ranked in last place in cyber sec urity when compared against 17 major private industries, including transportation, retail and healthcare, according to benchmarking firm Sec urityScorecard.

An update of the rankings in August showed the U.S. government had improved to third worst, ahead of only telecommunications and education.

“We also must recognize – in both the public and private sec tors, including the SEC – that there will be intrusions, and that a key component of cyber risk management is resilience and recovery,” said SEC Chairman Jay Clayton.

The federal government audits cyber sec urity measures every year at top agencies, producing reports that routinely expose shortfalls and sometimes major breaches. The Federal Bureau of Investigation also looks for hacking attempts and helped spot an alleged intrusion by Chinese military-backed hackers into a major banking regulator between 2010 and 2013.

Weekly scans of government systems by the Department of Homeland Sec urity showed in January that the SEC had critical cyber sec urity weaknesses but that vulnerabilities were worse at three agencies, including the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Health and Human Services and the General Services Administration.

Some agencies said they had improved their cyber sec urity posture since that report.

For more about cybersecurity, see Fortune’s video:

A GSA spokeswoman said the agency has not had any critical vulnerabilities in the past six months, and that the ones identified in January were patched in under 10 days.

A Department of Labor spokesman said all identified vulnerabilities had been fixed and that its systems were not compromised by the identified flaws.

But, he added, “addressing vulnerabilities associated with legacy systems can be challenging.”

Tech

Want to run your own Amazon ‘region’? Stratoscale shows you how

Stratoscale is a small company with a very big ambition: to turn your datacenter into an Amazon Web Services (AWS) region. Forget OpenStack, forget VMware. Stratoscale aims to help IT shops get beyond device-level virtualization and deliver the same app-friendly building blocks AWS provides. In the process, the company promises to cut the cost of operating datacenters by more than 80 percent.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here