Oracle settles with ex-worker over alleged fiddling of cloud accounts

Oracle has informed a federal court that it is settling a lawsuit in which a former employee had charged that she had been terminated from her job for refusing to go along with accounting principles that she did not consider lawful.

In a joint submission Wednesday to the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, lawyers for Oracle and the former employee, Svetlana Blackburn, asked to vacate a case management conference scheduled for Thursday, while submitting a notice of settlement to notify the court “that the lawsuit has been settled in principle, and to request thirty (30) days in which to file a dismissal.”

The lawsuit had drawn interest amid concern that companies could be dressing up their cloud revenue in a highly competitive environment. Gartner, for example, warned in December 2015, that “assessing vendor cloud revenue claims has become more challenging, with many vendors’ IT-related businesses being complicated and nuanced.”

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Oracle settles with ex-worker over alleged fiddling of cloud accounts

Oracle has informed a federal court that it is settling a lawsuit in which a former employee had charged that she had been terminated from her job for refusing to go along with accounting principles that she did not consider lawful.

In a joint submission Wednesday to the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, lawyers for Oracle and the former employee, Svetlana Blackburn, asked to vacate a case management conference scheduled for Thursday, while submitting a notice of settlement to notify the court “that the lawsuit has been settled in principle, and to request thirty (30) days in which to file a dismissal.”

The lawsuit had drawn interest amid concern that companies could be dressing up their cloud revenue in a highly competitive environment. Gartner, for example, warned in December 2015, that “assessing vendor cloud revenue claims has become more challenging, with many vendors’ IT-related businesses being complicated and nuanced.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Oracle settles with ex-worker over alleged fiddling of cloud accounts

Oracle has informed a federal court that it is settling a lawsuit in which a former employee had charged that she had been terminated from her job for refusing to go along with accounting principles that she did not consider lawful.

In a joint submission Wednesday to the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, lawyers for Oracle and the former employee, Svetlana Blackburn, asked to vacate a case management conference scheduled for Thursday, while submitting a notice of settlement to notify the court “that the lawsuit has been settled in principle, and to request thirty (30) days in which to file a dismissal.”

The lawsuit had drawn interest amid concern that companies could be dressing up their cloud revenue in a highly competitive environment. Gartner, for example, warned in December 2015, that “assessing vendor cloud revenue claims has become more challenging, with many vendors’ IT-related businesses being complicated and nuanced.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Asus settles charges over insecure routers and cloud services

Critical security flaws in routers and cloud computing services offered by Asus put hundreds of thousands of customers at risk, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission has charged.

Taiwan-based Asus has agreed to settle an FTC complaint that it failed to take reasonable steps to secure the software on its routers, the agency said Tuesday. 

In addition to well-documented vulnerabilities in the routers, its cloud services led to thousands of customers’ storage devices being compromised and exposed their personal information, the agency said.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Asus settles charges over insecure routers and cloud services

Critical security flaws in routers and cloud computing services offered by Asus put hundreds of thousands of customers at risk, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission has charged.

Taiwan-based Asus has agreed to settle an FTC complaint that it failed to take reasonable steps to secure the software on its routers, the agency said Tuesday. 

In addition to well-documented vulnerabilities in the routers, its cloud services led to thousands of customers’ storage devices being compromised and exposed their personal information, the agency said.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing