World Economic Forum Says Tech Firms Must Do More to Tackle Extremism

If tech firms don’t act, governments may impose regulations limiting free speech.

U.S. tech firms such as Facebook fb and Twitter twtr should be more aggressive in tackling extremism and political misinformation if they want to avoid government action, a report from the World Economic Forum said on Monday.

The study from the Swiss nonprofit organization adds to a chorus of calls for Silicon Valley to stem the spread of violent material from Islamic State militants and the use of their services by alleged Russian propagandists.

Facebook, Twitter and Alphabet’s Google goog will go under the microscope of U.S. lawmakers on Tuesday and Wednesday when their general counsels will testify before three U.S. congressional committees on alleged Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

For more on Facebook and the spread of fake news, watch Fortune’s video:

The report from the World Economic Forum‘s human rights council warns that tech companies risk government regulation that would limit freedom of speech unless they “assume a more active self-governance role.”

It recommends that the companies conduct more thorough internal reviews of how their services can be misused and that they put in place more human oversight of content.

The German parliament in June approved a plan to fine social media networks up to 50 million euros if they fail to remove hateful postings promptly, a law that Monday’s study said could potentially lead to the takedown of massive amounts of content.

Tech

Facebook says will make ads more transparent

(Reuters) – Facebook said on Friday it will make advertising on its social network more transparent and ask for documentation from advertisers, especially for political and election-related ads.

FILE PHOTO: Facebook logo is seen at a start-up companies gathering at Paris’ Station F in Paris, France on January 17, 2017. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer/File Photo

Advertisers will be required to include a disclosure in their election-related ads, which will read: “Paid for by,” Facebook said.

Reporting by Laharee Chatterjee in Bengaluru; Editing by Sai Sachin Ravikumar

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Tech

Why Elon Musk says 50% of all cars will be electric by 2027

It’s time to hit the reset button on the gas engine. As you may already know, the electric car is now much more viable than it was 10 years ago—there are charging stations in every major city scattered everywhere, particularly at hotels and along major highways. One glance at just the Tesla supercharger network of 900 stations proves that point.

Yet, to reach the point where more than half of all new cars are fully electric by 2027—as Elon Musk predicted recently—there needs to be a massive undertaking that only the enterprise can understand. It is not a consumer endeavor but one that must be backed by IT, similar to an ERP roll-out or a massive Windows deployment.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

On-premises HR users risk being left behind, Oracle says

Oracle is telling customers that the future of its HR platform will be in the cloud. It’s trying to do this without alarming users who host its applications internally.

Users of on-premises PeopleSoft and E-Business Suite HR system users won’t be abandoned as cloud use grows, Oracle promises. These systems will get regular updates and new features. There’s no end-of-life risk, said Mark Hurd, Oracle’s CEO. “No worries about that,” he said.

Even with that, however, Oracle’s cloud-basedHuman Capital Management (HCM) system will see many more new features and will pull ahead in capability over on-premises systems, said Hurd.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

AWS says a typo caused the massive S3 failure this week

Everyone makes mistakes. But working at Amazon Web Services means an incorrectly entered input can lead to a massive outage that cripples popular websites and services. That’s apparently what happened earlier this week, when the AWS Simple Storage Service (S3) in the provider’s Northern Virginia region experienced an 11-hour system failure.

Other Amazon services in the US-EAST-1 region that rely on S3, like Elastic Block Store, Lambda, and the new instance launch for the Elastic Compute Cloud infrastructure-as-a-service offering were all impacted by the outage.

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CIO Cloud Computing

SAP license fees are due even for indirect users, court says

SAP’s named-user licensing fees apply even to related applications that only offer users indirect visibility of SAP data, a U.K. judge ruled Thursday in a case pitting SAP against Diageo, the alcoholic beverage giant behind Smirnoff vodka and Guinness beer.

The consequences could be far-reaching for businesses that have integrated their customer-facing systems with an SAP database, potentially leaving them liable for license fees for every customer that accesses their online store.

“If any SAP systems are being indirectly triggered, even if incidentally, and from anywhere in the world, then there are uncategorized and unpriced costs stacking up in the background,” warned Robin Fry, a director at software licensing consultancy Cerno Professional Services, who has been following the case.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

SAP license fees are due even for indirect users, U.K. court says

SAP’s named-user licensing fees apply even to related applications that only offer users indirect visibility of SAP data, a U.K. judge ruled Thursday. The case pitted SAP against Diageo, the alcoholic beverage giant behind Smirnoff vodka and Guinness beer.

The consequences could be far-reaching for businesses that have integrated their customer-facing systems with an SAP database, potentially leaving them liable for license fees for every customer that accesses their online store.

“If any SAP systems are being indirectly triggered, even if incidentally, and from anywhere in the world, then there are uncategorized and unpriced costs stacking up in the background,” warned Robin Fry, a director at software licensing consultancy Cerno Professional Services, who has been following the case.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Containers will be a $2.6B market by 2020, research firm says

CIO Cloud Computing

Cisco, HPE led $88B enterprise infrastructure market in ’16, Synergy says

Despite more and more companies outsourcing workloads to the public cloud, legacy technology stalwarts Cisco and HPE remain the most popular enterprise infrastructure vendors, new estimates from Synergy Research suggest.

Synergy tracked enterprise infrastructure spending across seven categories for the 12 months leading up to the end of Q3 2016: Data center servers; switches & routers; network security; voice systems, WLAN; UC Apps and telepresence. In aggregate it estimates revenues were $ 88 billion across these segments, with spending down about 1% from the same time period in 2015.

+MORE AT NETWORK WORLD: This company is transferring 50 Petabytes of data to Amazon’s cloud +

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Network World Cloud Computing