Is Chrome OS right for you? A 3-question quiz to find out

Google’s Chrome OS is one of the world’s most misunderstood computing platforms. Chromebooks are foundationally different from traditional PCs, after all — and consequently, there are a lot of misconceptions about how they work and what they can and cannot do.

Since people are always asking me whether a Chromebook might be right for their needs, I thought I’d put together a quick guide to help any such wonderers figure it out. Whether it’s you or someone you know who’s curious, the following three questions should help shed some light on what the platform’s all about and for whom it makes sense.

1. Do you spend most of your time using the web and web-centric services?

Think carefully here, as the answer might surprise you: What do you do most often on a computer?

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Twilio does speech recognition and understanding, the right way

We’ve all had horrendous experiences with voice recognition when calling a support center – I’d like to think that it’s just me with my slightly unusual Kiwi accent, but everyone I talk to has similar stories of getting exasperated at an automated call center that hopelessly gets even the most basic speech recognition exercises wrong. It’s a sad reality of the modern world that organizations try to shoehorn users into solutions that aren’t yet fit for purpose, just to save some costs.

The world of communications has been the focus of Jeff Lawson for the past few years. Lawson is founder and CEO of Twilio, the company that offers a modular communications platform that developers use to power the communication functions of their apps. From tiny startups to huge companies like Uber rely on Twilio to manage all the communication stuff, so that they don’t have to. in a phone conversation prior to Twilio’s annual developer conference, Signal, Lawson told me that ever since the beginnings of Twilio, back when all they did was voice communications, he has hated voice recognition.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Moving to the cloud? First choose the right apps

Most enterprise IT shops have more than 1,000 applications they must understand or relearn before moving any of them to the cloud. You simply can’t move your apps en masse.

Why? Because some workloads make sense for the cloud, and some do not. Here’s my guide on how you can assess which are good candidates for a move to the cloud.

Key factors for determining cloud-ready applications

Good candidates for the cloud are applications that were built in the last 15 years and use a language supported by your target cloud. If you find an analogous platform for these in the cloud, your migration should be easy.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

The right way to migrate to the cloud

Migration to the cloud is a journey that presents new challenges. Along the way, you need to consider more details than you first thought, and there are many paths available to move applications, but not all of them are right for your migration.

The first step for every migration is to define the types of workloads you need to migrate. This does not mean each application, but the patterns of processing that the applications comprise. You must determine what those patterns are, then place existing workloads in each pattern.

For example, let’s say these three patterns of workloads exist in your enterprise:

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

3 types of private clouds: Which one’s right for you?

Forrester Research describes the Infrastructure-as-a-Service private cloud industry as healthy, growing and “intensely competitive.”

“Customers no longer question cloud computing? as a viable technology choice,” writes Forrester senior analyst Lauren Nelson in a recent report. “And in a growing number of enterprises, cloud is now the first choice.”

+MORE AT NETWORK WORLD: Top Tech Turkeys of 2015 | 10 mightiest supercomputers in the world +

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Network World Cloud Computing

Is the cloud the right spot for your big data?

Is the cloud a good spot for big data?

That’s a controversial question, and the answer changes depending on who you ask.

Last week I attended the HP Big Data Conference in Boston and both an HP customer and an executive told me that big data isn’t a good fit for the public cloud.

I’ve heard many cloud vendors tell me the opposite.

+MORE AT NETWORK WORLD: Why big data will be a big deal for the new HP +

CB Bohn is a senior database engineer at Etsy, and a user of HP’s Vertica database. The online marketplace uses the public cloud for some workloads, but its primary functions are run out of a co-location center, Bohn said. It doesn’t make sense for the company to lift and shift its Postgres, Vertica SQL and Hadoop workloads into the public cloud, he said. It would be a massive undertaking for the company to port all the data associated with those programs into the cloud. Then, once its transferred to the cloud, the company would have to pay ongoing costs to store it there. Meanwhile, the company has a co-lo facility already set up and expertise in house to manage the infrastructure required to run those programs. The cloud just isn’t a good fit for Etsy’s big data, Bohn says.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Public, Private, Hybrid? Choosing the Right Cloud Mix

Public, Private, Hybrid? Choosing the Right Cloud Mix
Identifying which IT operations are candidates for cloud deployment is just the first step; organizations also have to decide whether they want their applications hosted in a public, private or hybrid cloud environment. Each model offers its own …
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10 Online Cloud Computing Courses To Get Ahead
With this much money being directed at cloud computing, businesses' need for staff with cloud skills has led to an increased number of training courses related to the field. In particular online courses, which provide valuable skills in the learner's …
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Microsoft woos startups with 0K in cloud computing credits
Microsoft is trying to lure more startups onto its Azure cloud services by offering a substantial $ 120,000 credit for companies that qualify for its BizSpark Plus program. Starting July 1, qualifying companies will receive $ 10,000 worth of Azure …
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Brace yourselves: Public cloud is coming. When? Er… soon, possibly
Widespread uptake of the public cloud is not happening anytime soon, despite strong growth from the likes of Amazon Web Services, it added. However, this is up from IaaS/PaaS accounting for just three per cent of the total infrastructure services …
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