Oracle survey: Java EE users want REST, HTTP/2

In September and October, Oracle asked Java users to rank future Java EE enhancements by importance. The survey’s 1700 participants put REST services and HTTP/2 as top priorities, followed by Oauth and OpenID, eventing, and JSON-B (Java API for JSON Binding).

“REST (JAX-RS 2.1) and HTTP/2 (Servlet 4.0) have been voted as the two most important technologies surveyed, and together with JSON-B represent three of the top six technologies,” a report on the survey concludes. “Much of the new API work in these technologies for Java EE 8 is already complete. There is significant value in delivering Java EE 8 with these technologies, and the related JSON-P (JSON with Padding) updates, as soon as possible.”

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CIO Cloud Computing

Oracle survey: Java EE users want REST, HTTP/2

In September and October, Oracle asked Java users to rank future Java EE enhancements by importance. The survey’s 1700 participants put REST services and HTTP/2 as top priorities, followed by Oauth and OpenID, eventing, and JSON-B (Java API for JSON Binding).

“REST (JAX-RS 2.1) and HTTP/2 (Servlet 4.0) have been voted as the two most important technologies surveyed, and together with JSON-B represent three of the top six technologies,” a report on the survey concludes. “Much of the new API work in these technologies for Java EE 8 is already complete. There is significant value in delivering Java EE 8 with these technologies, and the related JSON-P (JSON with Padding) updates, as soon as possible.”

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

The cloud will absorb Windows (and the rest)

InfoWorld’s Eric Knorr has made the compelling point that perhaps Microsoft should get out of the Windows business and instead focus on the public cloud. I get that opinion. In the 1990s, I reviewed client operating systems that included Windows 95, Windows NT, OS/2, and about a dozen versions of Unix. In the back of my mind, I thought that was a fool’s errand, that we were focused on the wrong problem.

The past focus on client operating systems, then on mobile operating systems, was perhaps a misplaced effort. Why? For one thing, the complexity of it all — if you support client operating systems, you’re distributing complexity. Ask the people charged with supporting Windows — or any client OS, for that matter. They will most likely tell you that the complexity and difficulty is large.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing