Do you trust your cloud provider? Addressing these questions will help put you at ease

Although vendor-written, this contributed piece does not promote a product or service and has been edited and approved by Network World editors.

Finding a cloud provider you can trust has become a major responsibility.  Cloud providers come in all shapes and sizes—from global organizations delivering a range of services to small shops specializing in a limited number of capabilities. To normalize the differences you need to ask consistent questions about key issues.

Security should be at or near the very top of your list, with their answers providing the transparency which will help build trust.  An essential first step is to avoid making assumptions on what security is and isn’t with respect to a provider. Every provider is different, with different rules, service-level agreements (SLAs), and terms and conditions. Make sure you thoroughly understand what each service provider commits to you, the customer.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Oracle to buy cloud software provider NetSuite for $9.3 billion

Oracle has entered into an agreement to buy NetSuite, which provides cloud-based accounting, enterprise resource planning, customer relationship management, and other business software packages, for $ 9.3 billion.

The NetSuite package of products is complementary to Oracle’s cloud products and the companies’ cloud packages will “coexist in the marketplace forever,” Mark Hurd, Oracle’s CEO, said in a press release.

The deal will allow Oracle to serve a broader range of customers, including smaller businesses, and expand to more industries and more countries, the company said. Asked what additional advantages the deal brings, and Oracle spokeswoman said, “We are declining additional comment today.”

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Oracle pays $532 million to snatch up another cloud service provider

Hard on the heels of a similar purchase last week, Oracle has announced it will pay $ 532 million to buy Opower, a provider of cloud services to the utilities industry.

Once a die-hard cloud holdout, Oracle has been making up for lost time by buying a foothold in specific industries through acquisitions such as this one. Last week’s Textura buy gave it a leg up in engineering and construction.

“It’s a good move on Oracle’s part, and it definitely strengthens Oracle’s cloud story,” said Frank Scavo, president of Computer Economics.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Cloud backup: Don’t rely on your provider alone

You’ve moved data to the cloud. Now it’s time to talk about disaster recovery — how to build a resilient system that can recover from catastrophic failure.

Amazon Web Services, for example, says its S3 service “is designed to deliver flexibility, agility, geo-redundancy, and robust data protection.” To IT, that means the system is fault-tolerant, managing the resiliency needs for you. (“Geo-redundancy” means that, if a center goes down, another center in another part of the country or world will pick up the load. You should never miss a beat.)

If AWS and other public cloud providers include a certain amount of resiliency services, does that mean your data is safe? For the most part, it is. Public cloud providers take great pains to see that data is not lost — ever.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing