Boycott ISPs that abuse privacy, net neutrality

After Congress repealed the FCC’s broadband privacy rules two weeks ago, new Federal Communications Commission chairman Ajit Pai promised that the personal information they give to their ISPs would continue to be, well, private. Indeed, Pai said that he planned to work with the Federal Trade Commission to police ISPs around privacy issues.

However, many believe that this will not only fail to provide effective broadband privacy protections, but will also come at the cost of removing the FCC’s net neutrality rules. As you may recall, net neutrality prohibits ISPs like Verizon and Comcast from picking winners and losers on the open internet. Indeed, we could be heading for a day where the FTC actually won’t be able to regulate ISPs at all.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Privacy group shoots legal arrow at Privacy Shield

Privacy Shield, the legal agreement allowing businesses to export Europeans’ personal information to the U.S., is under fire.

An Irish privacy advocacy group has challenged the adoption of the decision in the EU’s second-highest court, Reuters reported Thursday, citing sources familiar with the case.

Privacy Shield took effect in July, replacing the Safe Harbor framework, which had itself fallen victim to a legal challenge in October 2015. The new agreement supports transatlantic commerce worth $ 260 billion, U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker has said, and has consequences for many companies offering cloud services to consumers.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

EU prepares to raise Privacy Shield over data transfers to U.S.

European Union officials are set to give final approval to a new EU-U.S. data transfer agreement early next week, after member states gave their approval to an updated text on Friday.

Privacy Shield is intended to replace the Safe Harbor Agreement as a means to legalize the transfer of EU citizens’ personal information to the U.S. while still respecting EU privacy laws.

A new deal is needed because the Court of Justice of the EU invalidated the Safe Harbor Agreement last October, concerned that it provided Europeans with insufficient protection from state surveillance when companies exported their personal data to the U.S. for processing.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

EU prepares to raise Privacy Shield over data transfers to U.S.

European Union officials are set to give final approval to a new EU-U.S. data transfer agreement early next week, after member states gave their approval to an updated text on Friday.

Privacy Shield is intended to replace the Safe Harbor Agreement as a means to legalize the transfer of EU citizens’ personal information to the U.S. while still respecting EU privacy laws.

A new deal is needed because the Court of Justice of the EU invalidated the Safe Harbor Agreement last October, concerned that it provided Europeans with insufficient protection from state surveillance when companies exported their personal data to the U.S. for processing.

The first draft of Privacy Shield agreement presented by the European Commission in January lacked key assurances from U.S. officials on the same matters that had concerned the CJEU about Safe Harbor.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

In rare unanimous move, House passes bill to protect email and cloud privacy

The U.S. House of Representatives, in a rare unanimous vote, has approved a bill to strengthen privacy protections for email and other data stored in the cloud.

The Email Privacy Act would require law enforcement agencies to get court-ordered warrants to search email and other data stored with third parties for longer than six months. The House on Wednesday voted 419-0 to pass the legislation and send it to the Senate.

The bill, with 314 cosponsors in the House, would update a 30-year-old law called the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA). Some privacy advocates and tech companies have been pushing Congress to update ECPA since 2011.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing