IBM makes leap in quantum computing power

IBM has some new options for businesses wanting to experiment with quantum computing.

Quantum computers, when they become commercially available, are expected to vastly outperform conventional computers in a number of domains, including machine learning, cryptography and the optimization of business problems in the fields of logistics and risk analysis.

Where conventional computers deal in ones and zeros (bits) the processors in quantum computers use qubits, which can simultaneously hold the values one and zero. This — to grossly oversimplify — allows a quantum computer with a 5-qubit processor to perform a calculation for 32 different input values at the same time.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

IBM’s Power chips hit the big time at Google

Google and Rackspace are designing a server based on IBM’s upcoming Power9 processor, a sure sign that Intel is no longer the only game in town for cloud service providers.

The companies announced plans for the system, which they call Zaius, at IBM’s OpenPower Summit in Silicon Valley on Wednesday. It’s one of several new Power servers on show at the event.

They plan to submit the design to the Open Compute Project, meaning other companies will be able to use the design as well.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Microsoft’s Power BI sports new ‘publish to Web’ feature

Microsoft’s Power BI data visualization service is making it possible for companies to share their business information with the world in an interactive format. 

On Tuesday, Microsoft launched the beta version of a new publish to Web feature that lets people take Power BI dashboards (which display information from a variety of data sources) and show them off on the Web in a live-updating format.

The feature means that companies’ Power BI use can work double duty as both an internal tool to help employees keep track of key statistics, as well as a way to share that information with the outside world. Companies can build custom visualizations so that the dashboards they create are tailored to the work they do. 

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Computerworld Cloud Computing