Oracle outlines plans to take on Amazon in cloud

Oracle executives on Tuesday revealed the results of years’ worth of engineering and development efforts on its IaaS public cloud and announced a new bare metal cloud database service and an international geographic expansion.

Oracle is typically not considered one of the top IaaS public cloud leaders, but the company has hopes of competing in the market by combining its infrastructure services – which focus on its core database services – with a suite of application development and software as a service offerings. At its Cloud World event in New York, company executives laid out their vision of how they will take on competitors such as Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure and Salesforce.com.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Japan plans superefficient supercomputer by 2017

Japan plans to build a super-efficient computer that could vault it to the top of the world’s supercomputer rankings by the end of next year.

With a processing capacity of 130 petaflops, the planned computer would outperform the current world leader, China’s Sunway TaihuLight, which delivers 93 petaflops. One petaflop is one million billion floating-point operations per second.

Japan’s National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) isn’t just aiming to build the world’s fastest supercomputers, it also wants to make one of the most efficient. It is aiming for a power consumption of under 3 megawatts — a staggering figure, given that Japan’s current highest entry in the Top500 supercomputer list, Oakforest-PACS, delivers one-tenth the performance (13.6 petaflops) for the same power.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Japan plans superefficient supercomputer by 2017

Japan plans to build a super-efficient computer that could vault it to the top of the world’s supercomputer rankings by the end of next year.

With a processing capacity of 130 petaflops, the planned computer would outperform the current world leader, China’s Sunway TaihuLight, which delivers 93 petaflops. One petaflop is one million billion floating-point operations per second.

Japan’s National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) isn’t just aiming to build the world’s fastest supercomputers, it also wants to make one of the most efficient. It is aiming for a power consumption of under 3 megawatts — a staggering figure, given that Japan’s current highest entry in the Top500 supercomputer list, Oakforest-PACS, delivers one-tenth the performance (13.6 petaflops) for the same power.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Alphabet plans analytics platform to help cities solve traffic problems

Sidewalks Labs, a unit of Alphabet, is teaming up with the U.S. Department of Transportation to build a data and analytics platform that promises to help cities understand where people go and how they get there.

The goal is to help better design transportation infrastructure to suit a city’s needs.

The platform, called Flow, will rely on one of Alphabet’s core strengths: collecting, analyzing and visualizing vast amounts of data.

The system will help cities identify congestion and areas that are underserved by public transportation, enabling planners to come up with a better citywide plan that uses current and new forms of transportation, like ridesharing, Sidewalk says. That’s getting more important as commute times and distances grow longer.

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Network World Cloud Computing

ZeroStack hatches plans for no-hassle, cloud-managed OpenStack

If there’s one part of the OpenStack market that never stops yielding enterprising newcomers, it’s the market for solutions to simplify OpenStack implementations. Not only could OpenStack still use help there, but such an approach nearly guarantees a revenue stream.

Newest to this table is ZeroStack, a freshly decloaked startup from VMware and AMD alumni, with a novel approach to OpenStack management for smaller and midtier outfits.

Your OpenStack is their business

ZeroStack’s idea is a mixture of an on-premises 2U appliance and a cloud-based SaaS portal. The appliance, a mixture of infrastructure and controller, is installed in the customer’s data center, and administration is done through ZeroStack’s cloud portal. Changes to the software are pushed out automatically to appliances from the cloud, and ZeroStack claims it can bring an existing OpenStack installation up to the latest revision of the product within two months of release.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing