IDG Contributor Network: Checking in on a newly acquired NetSuite

Last week, around 10,000 customers, partners, analysts and employees descended on Las Vegas for NetSuite’s SuiteWorld conference.

This was the first SuiteWorld since Oracle’s acquisition of NetSuite. All eyes were on the conference to see how the tone might have changed as NetSuite entered the mothership. As previous SuiteWorld’s have all taken place in the Bay Area, this was also the first time the event was held in Las Vegas. Former CEO Zach Nelson’s departure from the company added to the already high levels of interest in the event.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Oracle to buy cloud software provider NetSuite for $9.3 billion

Oracle has entered into an agreement to buy NetSuite, which provides cloud-based accounting, enterprise resource planning, customer relationship management, and other business software packages, for $ 9.3 billion.

The NetSuite package of products is complementary to Oracle’s cloud products and the companies’ cloud packages will “coexist in the marketplace forever,” Mark Hurd, Oracle’s CEO, said in a press release.

The deal will allow Oracle to serve a broader range of customers, including smaller businesses, and expand to more industries and more countries, the company said. Asked what additional advantages the deal brings, and Oracle spokeswoman said, “We are declining additional comment today.”

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

NetSuite CEO: The cloud is the last computing architecture

As CEO of NetSuite, Zach Nelson knows a thing or two about cloud computing. After all, his company was born in the cloud way back in 1998 — before it became fashionable — and it’s been all-cloud ever since, offering ERP and other business software as a service by subscription.

“We were effectively the first cloud app,” Nelson said in a recent interview. “The idea was to build a system to run a business, and oh by the way, deliver it over the Internet.”

Originally, the company was known as NetLedger. Today, it has plenty of company in the cloud.

Not only have a raft of other cloud-first startups arrived, but traditional vendors of on-premises business software also have been racing to the cloud with new and retooled offerings for enterprise resource planning, e-commerce, customer relationship management and more.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

NetSuite CEO: The cloud is the last computing architecture

As CEO of NetSuite, Zach Nelson knows a thing or two about cloud computing. After all, his company was born in the cloud way back in 1998 — before it became fashionable — and it’s been all-cloud ever since, offering ERP and other business software as a service by subscription.

“We were effectively the first cloud app,” Nelson said in a recent interview. “The idea was to build a system to run a business, and oh by the way, deliver it over the Internet.”

Originally, the company was known as NetLedger. Today, it has plenty of company in the cloud.

Not only have a raft of other cloud-first startups arrived, but traditional vendors of on-premises business software also have been racing to the cloud with new and retooled offerings for enterprise resource planning, e-commerce, customer relationship management and more.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing