IDG Contributor Network: Qwilt moves content delivery to the edge

The other day I was quietly driving along a country road near where I live and happened across an irate looking driver, parked up at the edge of the road. Much of his irate-ness was, I assume, caused by the fact that he was driving a late model, European sports car which had unceremoniously broken down rendering him hot (it’s summer in the Southern Hemisphere), immobile and in possession of a very expensive hunk of steel and alloy.

As I left the scene, with him not wanting outside help, I got thinking about how being broken down on the side of a road with a very expensive vehicle is analogous to having some fantastic content on the internet that, alas, can’t get to those who want to view it. It looks good, but is pretty much useless to everyone.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Weaveworks moves beyond Docker with plug-in for Kubernetes

An announcement coming today from networking vendor Weaveworks is interesting in and of itself, but even more so when seen in the broader context.

Weaveworks is the vendor behind Weave, a networking and monitoring tool for the Docker containerization platform. The company is today announcing the availability of a plug-in for the Kubernetes cloud-native operating system. Weave Net 1.5 works with the Kubernetes Container Networking Interface and allows multicast networking integrated with Kubernetes-based applications.

Weaveworks is talking up the applicability of this offering to specific verticals, in particular, the financial services industry:

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Network World Cloud Computing

Skullcandy unplugs MPLS, moves to WAN-as-a-Service

The move to a cloud-based ERP system forced Skullcandy to rethink its global network, which ultimately led to the decision to migrate to an offering from Aryaka.  Network World Editor in Chief John Dix recently discussed the migration with Systems Manager Yohan Beghein.

skullcandy systems manager yohan beghein

Skullcandy Systems Manager Yohan Beghein

What WAN problem were you having that encouraged you to go looking for an alternative?

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Network World Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Microsoft moves to answer those pesky Safe Harbor concerns

A few weeks ago when the news came out that Safe harbor provisions would no longer be a safe haven for U.S. vendors doing business in Europe, there was plenty of concern about what it would mean for the largest U.S. cloud vendors — Salesforce, Microsoft, Google and Amazon Web Services (AWS) all have massive business in Europe and relied on the Safe Harbor provisions to keep customers feeling secure.

It didn’t take long to see some reactions from the vendor side and just this week Microsoft announced a plan to offer many of its cloud services, including Azure, Office 365 and Dynamics CRM Online, served directly from data centers in Germany. But that in itself isn’t particularly innovative, and may not actually resolve the issues around jurisdiction. So Microsoft is moving beyond simply having in-country data centers and are delivering services in Germany via a third party. 

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Google moves two cloud data analysis services out of beta

Two Google big data toolsets have finally moved out of beta and into full commercial release, adding to its cloud portfolio a data analysis framework and a service for managing data streams in real-time.

Google Cloud Dataflow, which could serve as a possible replacement for Hadoop, provides a framework for fusing different sources of data within one processing pipeline. Google Cloud Pub/Sub is the company’s service for managing data streams in real time.

The two services fill out Google’s roster of cloud-based data analysis tools, joining Google BigQuery, a commercial service for analyzing large sets of unstructured data.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing