Microsoft’s P language is aimed at where cloud, AI, and IoT meet

Microsoft is positioning its P language as a solution for asynchrony in a world where this capability is becoming increasingly vital for the cloud, artificial intelligence, and embedded systems.

Geared to asynchronous event-driven programming, the open source P unifies modeling and programming into a single activity. “Today’s software uses cloud resources, is often embedded in devices in the physical world and employs artificial intelligence techniques,” said Shaz Qadeer, a principal researcher at Microsoft. Such applications feature asynchrony, leading to issues with race conditions and “heisenbugs” (named after the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle), which are timing-related bugs that often disappear during an investigation of it. P was was built to address the challenges.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

‘Meet’ Google’s new videoconferencing service for the enterprise

Google appears to have accidentally revealed its new group videoconferencing service for businesses on Tuesday, a week before a big user conference.

The service, called Meet, appears to be its offering for businesses that want to do group meetings over the Internet. According to a saved iOS App Store listing captured by AppAnnie, it will support high-definition video meetings with up to 30 participants. That’s an upgrade over the company’s Hangouts instant messaging and video calling service, which only allows meetings of up to 10 people.

google meet merged Google/AppAnnie

A trio of screenshots shows Google Meet’s functionality on iOS

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Meet Flock, a Slack rival that claims big productivity gains

Numerous Slack contenders have already thrown their hats into the enterprise-messaging ring, but Flock is hoping to win with hard numbers. According to Flock, not only does its software load 2.5 times faster than Slack on both desktop and mobile, but it also helps teams achieve productivity gains of at least 30 percent.

Originally launched in India roughly two years ago, the company announced its expansion into the U.S. market on Wednesday and revealed a customer list that includes big-name brands such as Whirlpool, Ricoh, Victorinox and Tim Horton’s.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Meet the real architects of tomorrow’s enterprise cloud

In the not-too-distant future, you’re going to hear a lot more about the CNCF (Cloud Native Computing Foundation). The brainchild of Craig McLuckie, product manager for Google Cloud Platform and founder of Google’s Kubernetes project, the CNCF will lead the development of a standardized, open source platform for managing next-gen enterprise clouds of Docker containers.

Why is the CNCF so important? Because the future of enterprise computing is the cloud, and the future of the cloud is in the emerging container layer enabled by Docker and its rapidly expanding ecosystem. Basically, the CNCF’s mission is to take the hyperscale technology developed by such Internet giants as Google, Facebook, and Twitter and deliver it to the enterprise, resulting in what McLuckie calls “radical operational efficiencies.”

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Get ready to meet Kudu, a new, open-source storage engine from Cloudera

An open-source storage engine called Kudu could soon be on the way from Cloudera, offering a new alternative for companies with big data stores to manage.

Kudu will be offered as an alternative to the popular Hadoop Distributed File System and the Hadoop-oriented HBase NoSQL database, according to a VentureBeat report, which cited a slide deck on Kudu’s design goals.

A small Cloudera team has reportedly been working on Kudu for the past two years. The company has already been pitching it to customers and plans to release it as Apache-licensed open-source software at the end of this month, VentureBeat said, citing a source familiar with the matter.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing