IBM makes leap in quantum computing power

IBM has some new options for businesses wanting to experiment with quantum computing.

Quantum computers, when they become commercially available, are expected to vastly outperform conventional computers in a number of domains, including machine learning, cryptography and the optimization of business problems in the fields of logistics and risk analysis.

Where conventional computers deal in ones and zeros (bits) the processors in quantum computers use qubits, which can simultaneously hold the values one and zero. This — to grossly oversimplify — allows a quantum computer with a 5-qubit processor to perform a calculation for 32 different input values at the same time.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

AWS is still a minnow — but it makes big waves

Amazon Web Services may no longer surpass 10X the utilized capacity of its next 14 closest competitors, thanks to a booming Microsoft Azure and signs of life at Google, but it’s still the $ 10 billion-plus gorilla in cloud computing. Ironically, this makes it a mere minnow in the grand scheme of enterprise IT. The overall IT market surpasses $ 4 trillion, with cloud (IaaS, SaaS, PaaS, and so on) accounting for only 10 percent of the total, as Apprenda executive Joseph Jacks reminds us.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Nervana’s cloud platform makes deep learning more widely available

Deep learning has usually been accessible to only the largest organizations, but that’s starting to change. On Monday, an AI startup called Nervana launched a cloud offering for what it calls deep learning on demand.

Nervana Cloud is a hosted platform designed to give organizations of all sizes the ability to quickly build and deploy deep-learning tools without having to invest in infrastructure equipment or a large team of experts. Based on neon, Nervana’s open-source deep-learning framework, the full-stack offering is optimized to handle complex machine-learning problems at scale.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Safe Harbor’s ending makes for a good start for Cloud28+

After two months of beta testing, European enterprise app and service store Cloud28+ is open for business, making it easier for companies wanting to host their applications or data in Europe to find a home for them.

A beta test is usually a shakedown, intended to remove any lingering bugs, but for Cloud28+ it was more of a shake-up.

The Cloud28+ catalog offers European businesses around 700 infrastructure-, platform- and software-as-a-service offerings from almost 150 partners. It allows them to choose services based on price, performance, and the location where the data is hosted, among other criteria.

Barely a week after the beta test began, the first shock came, as data sovereignty and hosting location unexpectedly took on new importance for many European cloud services businesses. The European Union’s top court, asked to clarify a point of law in a case concerning Facebook in Ireland, struck down the Safe Harbor Agreement that had previously allowed businesses to export EU citizens’ personal data — that of their customers or employees, for instance — to the U.S. for processing. Those that weren’t scrambling to make new arrangements were left wondering whether they complied with EU data protection law, which requires that personal data be afforded the same level of privacy protection wherever it is processed.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Amazon makes it easier to lock down the cloud

Computerworld Cloud Computing