The method behind Google’s machine learning madness

First there was TensorFlow, Google’s machine learning framework. Then there was SyntaxNet, a neural network framework Google released to help developers build applications that understand human language. What comes next is anyone’s guess, but one thing is clear: Google is aggressively open-sourcing the smarts behind some of its most promising AI technology.

Despite giving it away for free, however, Google is also apparently betting that “artificial intelligence will be its secret sauce,” as Larry Dignan details. That “sauce” permeates a bevy of newly announced Google products like Google Home, but it’s anything but secret.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Bing Predicts begins March Madness early with NCAA tourney invitation predictions

The 2015 March Madness tournament was a triumphant year for Bing Predicts, the predictive algorithms that Microsoft uses to pick the outcomes of everything from reality TVs to sporting events. For 2016, Microsoft has launched March Madness even earlier, with a site predicting which schools will receive an invitation to the NCAA tournament.

The premise behind the new Arewein.net site is a simple one: Pick a university, and Bing will attempt to predict whether a given school is in or out, the overall chance they’ll make the tournament, and even their seeding in the overall bracket rankings.

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CIO Cloud Computing