Docker Enterprise now runs Windows and Linux in one cluster

With the newest Docker Enterprise Edition, you can now have Docker clusters composed of nodes running different operating systems.

Three of the key OSes supported by Docker—Windows, Linux, and IBM System Z—can run applications side by side in the same cluster, all orchestrated by a common mechanism.

Clustering apps across multiple OSes in Docker requires that you build per-OS images for each app. But those apps, when running on both Windows and Linux, can be linked to run in concert via Docker’s overlay networking.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

What is Docker? Linux containers explained

Like FreeBSD Jails and Solaris Zones, Linux containers are self-contained execution environments—with their own, isolated CPU, memory, block I/O, and network resources—that share the kernel of the host operating system. The result is something that feels like a virtual machine, but sheds all the weight and startup overhead of a guest operating system.

In a large-scale system, running VMs would mean you are probably running many duplicate instances of the same OS and many redundant boot volumes. Because containers are more streamlined and lightweight compared to VMs, you may be able to run six to eight times as many containers as VMs on the same hardware.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

3 little things in Linux 4.10 that will make a big difference

Linux never sleeps. Linus Torvalds is already hard at work pulling together changes for the next version of the kernel (4.11). But with Linux 4.10 now out, three groups of changes are worth paying close attention to because they improve performance and enable feature sets that weren’t possible before on Linux.

Here’s a rundown of those changes to 4.10 and what they likely will mean for you, your cloud providers, and your Linux applications.

1. Virtualized GPUs

One class of hardware that’s always been difficult to emulate in virtual machines is GPUs. Typically, VMs provide their own custom video driver (slow), and graphics calls have to be translated (slow) back and forth between guest and host. The ideal solution would be to run the same graphics driver in a guest that you use on the host itself and have all the needed calls simply relayed back to the GPU.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

RethinkDB finds a new home at the Linux Foundation

RethinkDB may have failed as a business, but it’s getting new life as part of the Linux Foundation. As announced today, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) has purchased the RethinkDB intellectual property assets for $ 25,000, which it has relicensed under the developer-friendly Apache License (ASLv2) and gifted the code to the Linux Foundation.

It’s an intriguing development and possibly an out for other failed startups with interesting software assets, although “it’s unlikely that another deal along these lines would emerge” given the “highly unusual set of circumstances,” as CNCF Executive Director Dan Kohn told me.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Why Microsoft open sourced PowerShell and ported it to Linux

Microsoft has open sourced PowerShell, it’s automation tool and command line shell. That’s not all, PowerShell is also coming to Linux. The alpha release of PowerShell for Linux is available on the GitHub page; you can test it on Ubuntu, Debian and CentOS. The source of PowerShell is also available on GitHub.

Surviving in the multi-cloud world

Microsoft has been kind of behind the UNIX (Linux) world when it comes to feature rich command line interfaces and tools. PowerShell was Microsoft’s answer to those developers who wanted such capabilities. Thanks to its .NET Framework base PowerShell has some great scripting capabilities….but it doesn’t have everything. It can’t cater to everyone.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Gain access to an ARM server running Linux OS, through the cloud

If you want to play with an ARM-based server, you can now apply to gain access to one online through the Linaro Developer Cloud.

The cloud service was announced in March but has finally gone live. It’s mainly targeted at developers who want to evaluate ARM servers.

The free service is one way to access ARM servers, which aren’t widely available. Applications go through an approval process, and only those serious about programming for ARM servers will likely be approved.

Developers will get remote access to bare-metal servers with ARM processors. Linaro has said servers will have ARM-based chips from Qualcomm, Cavium, and Huawei, and users will be able to select specific hardware.

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Network World Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: HP’s OpenSwitch becomes a Linux Foundation Project

HP’s open source networking operating system, OpenSwitch, is now a Linux Foundation project.

Many industry players are joining the project, including Broadcom, Cavium, Extreme Networks, LinkedIn, Mellanox, Nephos Inc., P4.org, Quattro Networks, SnapRoute and, of course, Hewlett Packard Enterprise.

OpenSwitch is full-featured, Linux-based modular and modern network operating system that provides support for traditional and cloud networking environments.

Commenting on the arrival of OpenSwicth Jim Zemlin, executive director at The Linux Foundation said, “OpenSwitch brings another important ingredient of the open networking stack to The Linux Foundation. We’re looking forward to working with this community to advance networking across the enterprise.”

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CIO Cloud Computing

Containers 101: Linux containers and Docker explained

Like FreeBSD Jails and Solaris Zones, Linux containers are self-contained execution environments — with their own, isolated CPU, memory, block I/O, and network resources — that share the kernel of the host operating system. The result is something that feels like a virtual machine, but sheds all the weight and startup overhead of a guest operating system.

In a large-scale system, running VMs would mean you are probably running many duplicate instances of the same OS and many redundant boot volumes. Because containers are more streamlined and lightweight compared to VMs, you may be able to run six to eight times as many containers as VMs on the same hardware.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Is it opposite day? Microsoft has a new Linux distro

It’s happened at last: Microsoft has its own version of Linux. But don’t expect to download an .ISO just yet. It isn’t publicly available — it’s an internal project developed to help run Microsoft networks such as Azure.

Microsoft’s Azure Cloud Switch (ACS) is not a Linux distribution on the order of Red Hat’s or Ubuntu’s; rather it’s closer to Cumulus Linux. ACS was built specifically for Microsoft’s own needs, and therefore is not a definitive sign that Microsoft is becoming a Linux player.

All in the Microsoft family

As described in a blog post yesterday, ACS is “a cross-platform modular operating system for data center networking built on Linux.” It is intended to run on commodity ASIC hardware from multiple switch vendors and to run Microsoft’s own software for managing network devices.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing