LinkedIn will help people in India train for semi-skilled jobs

Microsoft has launched Project Sangam, a cloud service integrated with LinkedIn that will help train and generate employment for middle and low-skilled workers.

The professional network that was acquired by Microsoft in December has been generally associated with educated urban professionals but the company is now planning to extend its reach to semi-skilled people in India.

Having connected white-collared professionals around the world with the right job opportunities and training through LinkedIn Learning, the platform is now developing a new set of products that extends this service to low- and semi-skilled workers, said Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella at an event on digital transformation in Mumbai on Wednesday.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Why Microsoft bought LinkedIn for $26 billion, in one word: Cortana

The image above says it all: Microsoft spent $ 26.1 billion to ensure that you’ll never walk into a meeting “cold” again.

Picture a typical business trip: meetings all day, drinks at night. A good salesperson knows his or her contacts before he or she steps foot in the door. But that goes for coworkers as well: How you you make them feel comfortable? How do you make them part of a team? How do you let them know who to approach, both inside and outside the company?

All of this usually takes some effort on your part, or at least a competent assistant. And that’s the role that Microsoft hopes to play, especially with its digital assistant, Cortana, and Office 365.

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Network World Cloud Computing

LinkedIn zombie hack returns for your braaains

LinkedIn was hacked way back in 2012, but the leak of passwords four years ago wasn’t the end of the story. Another 117 million have turned up, and many of those old passwords still seem to be valid.

But surely, I hear you ask, LinkedIn invalidated those old passwords in 2012? Nope. That turns out not to be the case — LinkedIn only forced a reset of the 6.5 million leaked ones, for fear of inconveniencing the other users.

Initially, LinkedIn’s response this time was the same, but thankfully saner heads prevailed and the company’s finally doing the right thing.

In IT Blogwatch, bloggers also consider changing their email addresses. Your humble blogwatcher curated these bloggy bits for your entertainment.

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