Oracle refreshes entire SaaS line, aiming to fuel cloud momentum

As the migration of enterprises to the cloud picks up steam, Oracle is intent on keeping up. It has taken to refreshing its SaaS applications twice a year, bringing them up to feature parity with its on-premises software and adding brand-new features for e-commerce and internet-centric supply chain management.

Oracle Cloud Applications Release 13, announced Wednesday, is the newest iteration of the company’s cloud-based business applications. It upgrades the user interface across all the apps and delivers new capabilities for supply chain management (SCM), ERP, human capital management (HCM) and the CX Cloud Suite for customer experience management.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Forget the GUI: The return of the command line

If you immerse yourself in Microsoft history for long enough, you’ll come across more than one story about staff trying to add more command-line features to its operating systems. The plans go up the corporate tree, to the rarified heights of a Bill Gates review, where the executives ask, “What part of the name Windows do you have a problem with?”

Corporate legends aside, Windows on both the desktop and server have long been the province of GUIs, point-and-click experiences driving everything from files on desktop PCs to managing entire virtual networks in the public cloud. That was all very well when you were dealing with tens of PCs and a handful of servers in an office. It even still worked for client-server enterprise applications or a small farm of web servers.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: How SaaS abandonment is killing your enterprise bottom line

Ten years ago every company bought enterprise software, often in abundance. Today, 96% of organizations have now shelved some or all of it. While buying software is daunting, it is essential for competing in increasingly sophisticated industries.

The right software stack can give companies a competitive advantage, and because it is so much easier to buy today, brands are increasingly open to buying from more and more vendors.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Stratasys unveils an assembly line of cloud-controlled robotic 3D printers

Stratasys is developing a cloud-service platform that comprises expandable, server rack-like modular 3D printer units configured under one software platform to work simultaneously to mass produce parts.

The assembly line-style 3D printing platform will reside both in Stratasys’ own facilities as well as on the premises of business partners who can use the new Continuous Build 3D Demonstrator system to build their own parts or allow customers to use it for their own manufacturing needs.

Stratasys 3D Continuous Build Demonstrator Stratasys

Each 3D “print cell” (an individual 3D printer) in the array can produce a different print job to enable mass customization in volume production environments. Additional print cells can be added at any time to the scalable platform, and there is no theoretical limit to the number of cells, according to Tim Bohling, chief marketing officer at Stratasys.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

A new app from SAP helps line managers keep track of their budgets

It’s not often easy for line-of-business managers to get a real-time view of their budgets and spending, but a new app from SAP aims to change that.

Based on SAP’s Hana Cloud Platform, the app pulls data from core financial reporting systems and makes it searchable, so that line managers can do ad hoc spend analyses and other on-the-fly calculations.

Called SAP RealSpend, the app lets managers drill down and perform a fine-grained analysis of actual and future spending. It can also deliver related forecast and budget plans.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

That man who ‘deleted his entire company’ with a line of code? It was a hoax

The owner of a Web hosting company who claimed to have erased his entire business from the Internet with a single script command appears to have made the whole thing up.

Marco Marsala of Italy posted a cry for help on the popular Server Fault forum earlier this week, claiming he’d accidentally erased all the data on his servers including backups.

“I run a small hosting provider with more or less 1,535 customers and I use Ansible to automate some operations to be run on all servers,” Marsala wrote. “Last night I accidentally ran, on all servers, a Bash script with a rm -rf {foo}/{bar} with those variables undefined due to a bug in the code above this line.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

That man who ‘deleted his entire company’ with a line of code? It was a hoax

The owner of a Web hosting company who claimed to have erased his entire business from the Internet with a single script command appears to have made the whole thing up.

Marco Marsala of Italy posted a cry for help on the popular Server Fault forum earlier this week, claiming he’d accidentally erased all the data on his servers including backups.

“I run a small hosting provider with more or less 1,535 customers and I use Ansible to automate some operations to be run on all servers,” Marsala wrote. “Last night I accidentally ran, on all servers, a Bash script with a rm -rf {foo}/{bar} with those variables undefined due to a bug in the code above this line.

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Network World Cloud Computing