Latest Apple Park Drone Footage Shows Basketball and Tennis Courts

Apple’s new campus is nearing completion.

Apple employees will be able to shoot hoops and play tennis at the company’s new Apple Park headquarters.

Aerial videographer Matthew Roberts released new drone footage Monday of Apple’s new headquarters, spanning 175 acres in Cupertino, Calif.

The drone footage shows some overhead shots of the nearly-finished campus, with several up-close shots of the massive 2.8 million spherical building serving as Apple Park’s centerpiece, where employees will be working. The video also shows new paved paths that crisscross throughout the campus, while big trucks are shown to be transporting trees to their designated planting areas.

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Apple aapl is also installing two big basketball and tennis courts for employees to use during their spare time. The courts however, appear to be unfinished as of when the video was recording, depicting a few massive empty lots for the time being.

In September, drone pilot Duncan Sinfield recorded aerial footage of Apple Park in prelude to the company’s latest iPhone launch.

Sinfield’s footage also featured Apple’s new auditorium, the Steve Jobs Theater, where Apple recently held its big media event and unveiled the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X, among other products.

Tech

This Tech IPO Is the Latest to Limit Rights of Small Investors

Super voting rights are a concern.

When data center operator Switch goes public on Friday it will be the latest tech firm using special shares to limit the rights of minority investors, making it ineligible for inclusion in the S&P 500 under new rules meant to deter such practices.

The Las Vegas company, run by enigmatic founder and CEO Rob Roy, plans to sell 31.3 million shares in an initial public offer late on Thursday for between $ 14 and $ 16 a piece, which would raise nearly $ 500 million and make it the largest technology listing this year after Snap.

Underwriters closed their order book late on Wednesday and the deal was oversubscribed, according to a source close to the IPO.

Roy, who describes himself as an “inventrepreneur” and “tech futurist,” will have 68% of voting power following the IPO, thanks to a special share class providing 10 votes per share.

That will keep Switch out of the S&P 500 and other related indexes under new rules instituted by S&P Dow Jones in July after Snap sold shares without any voting rights in its $ 3.4 billion IPO earlier this year.

Rule changes enacted last month for FTSE Russell indexes, also in reaction to Snap, require new constituents of its indexes to have at least 5% of their voting rights in the hands of public shareholders.

The shares being sold in Switch’s IPO will include 4.9% of the company’s voting rights, or 5.6% if underwriters exercise an option to buy additional shares.

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In its IPO filing and a profile of Roy on the company website, Switch gives no details about what he did before founding the company in 2000 or his academic qualifications. The profile describes him as “a recognized expert in advanced end-to-end solutions for mission-critical facilities.”

A company spokesman declined to provide additional information about Roy, and he does not appear in a 38-minute video marketing the IPO.

The IPO could value Switch, which operates three data centers in Michigan and Nevada, at almost $ 4 billion.

Snap co-founder Evan Spiegel was well known to Wall Street ahead of the Snapchat-owner’s February share offer, with many investors essentially betting on his talent. With Roy less known, investors may be taking a greater risk on a company in which they will have little say.

“Investors do look at voting control as well as the price you pay. If you put so much stock in the CEO, normally he’s going to part of the sales pitch for the company,” said Ken Bertsch, Executive Director of the Council of Institutional Investors, which represents top U.S. pension funds.

As many of 15% of U.S. IPOs in recent years have used dual share classes meant to give insiders outsized voting rights, according to the Council of Institutional Investors.

Inclusion in a stock index can be an important milestone for young companies, bringing their shares into many passive funds and others that closely follow indexes like the S&P 500, a guide for trillions of dollars of capital worldwide.

Other companies excluded from major indexes under their new rules include video-streaming company Roku Inc, whose IPO last week kept 97% of voting power with insiders. Software seller Mulesoft’s IPO in February included a share class with 10 votes per share, as did Blue Apron in its June debut.

Suggesting that the tide may be turning toward sharing power with minority investors, privately-held ride-hailing company Uber on Tuesday said it would abandon a dual share class system that favored insiders including former CEO Travis Kalanick.

Responding to a shareholder lawsuit, Facebook Inc in September gave up plans for a new class of stock that was meant to be a way for Mark Zuckerberg to retain control over the company he founded while fulfilling a pledge to give away his wealth.

Tech

Deloitte Is the Latest Target of a Cyber Attack With Confidential Client Data at Risk

Global accountancy firm Deloitte has been hit by a sophisticated hack that resulted in a breach of confidential information and plans from some of its biggest clients, Britain’s Guardian newspaper said on Monday.

Deloitte—one of the big four professional services providers—confirmed to the newspaper it had been hit by a hack, but it said only a small number of its clients had been impacted.

The firm discovered the hack in March, according to the Guardian, but the cyber attackers could have had breached its systems as long ago as October or November 2016.

The attack was believed to have been focused on the U.S. operations of the company, which provides auditing, tax advice, and consultancy to multinationals and governments worldwide.

“In response to a cyber incident, Deloitte implemented its comprehensive security protocol and began an intensive and thorough review including mobilizing a team of cybersecurity and confidentiality experts inside and outside of Deloitte,” a spokesman told the newspaper. “As part of the review, Deloitte has been in contact with the very few clients impacted and notified governmental authorities and regulators.”

A Deloitte spokeswoman declined immediate comment, saying that the firm would issue a statement shortly.

Tech

Zoho’s latest pitch: Run your entire business for $1 a day per user

Zoho wants to be the operating system for your business. That’s how the company puts it, and what it means is that you can now get just about any application you need to run a business using Zoho One, which gathers all of Zoho’s applications for $ 30 a month per user.

Zoho One, announced and available Tuesday,  includes all 38 Zoho cloud-based applications, plus about a half dozen native apps as well more than 40 mobile apps. It offers centralized administrative control through an Admin Panel, which lets companies manage applications and define administrative groups as well as security and access privileges.

In the cloud era, the price of productivity applications in particular has come down. For example, Google offers G Suite applications for $ 5 per user a month. But Zoho’s applications span the spectrum of sales and marketing, including CRM; operations, including finance, recruiting and HR software; collaboration and productivity, including an office suite, email, and project management; and IT and help desk apps. Zoho also offers Creator, to build custom applications.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Dell EMC combines hyperconvergence and cloud in latest VxRail offering

Dell EMC is now offering a combination of its VxRail hyperconverged infrastructure and the Dell EMC Enterprise Hybrid Cloud (EHC) platform to make it easier for mid-size organizations to build private clouds.

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VxRail, which combines compute, network and virtual storage, is based largely on VMware management software, including the vRealize Suite, which allows for self-provisioning of virtual machines, and vSAN, which is VMware’s virtual storage array. Dell EMC introduced VxRail about a year ago and Thursday said that to date it has sold 8,000 nodes to 1,000 customers, reaching over 65 Petabytes of scale.

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Network World Cloud Computing

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