IDG Contributor Network: RackWare, like everyone, wants to manage hybrid clouds everywhere

RackWare offers a management and automation platform that enterprises use to manage their computing resources to more closely follow demand. RackWare’s core proposition is that its management suite delivers cost savings to customers of a suggested 40 to 50 percent. Additionally, RackWare promises to deliver the highest levels of performance and availability to their customers.

The company today released a new take on its management suite that aims to extend the existing core RackWare offering. The new platform promises to offer enterprises a single solution (they refrained from calling it a single pane of glass) to move applications, protect those same applications and manage all the different applications across the totality of their infrastructure. Justifying the move, RackWare points to a recent IDC report that suggests 70 percent of heavy cloud users are considering a hybrid cloud strategy.

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Network World Cloud

Splice Machine seeks to deliver hybrid RDBMS as a service

Splice Machine, which specializes in an open source relational database for hybrid workloads, wants to bring that database to the cloud as a service.

The company announced this week that it will release Cloud RDBMS, a database-as-a-service (DBaaS) on Amazon Web Services (AWS) this spring. It noted that Cloud RDBMS will be able to power applications and perform analytics, without the need for ETL and separate analytical databases.

CIO Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: A guide to hybrid cloud transformation

Enterprises have made it clear that when it comes to cloud computing, one size does not fit all.  What we’re hearing from the market is the need for consistency with choice, otherwise known as a balanced cloud platform. Unique business needs, along with security, geography and regulatory considerations, dictate a mixing and matching of both public and private cloud solutions—thus the rise of hybrid.

Case in point, Forrester surveyed 1,000-plus North American and European enterprise decision makers and found that in the next 12 months 38 percent are building private clouds, 32 percent are building public clouds, and 59 percent are adopting a hybrid model.

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Network World Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: A guide to hybrid cloud transformation

Enterprises have made it clear that when it comes to cloud computing, one size does not fit all.  What we’re hearing from the market is the need for consistency with choice, otherwise known as a balanced cloud platform. Unique business needs, along with security, geography and regulatory considerations, dictate a mixing and matching of both public and private cloud solutions—thus the rise of hybrid.

Case in point, Forrester surveyed 1,000-plus North American and European enterprise decision makers and found that in the next 12 months 38 percent are building private clouds, 32 percent are building public clouds, and 59 percent are adopting a hybrid model.

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Network World Cloud Computing

AWS roundup: Hybrid deployments with Amazon’s cloud get a boost

You would think that Amazon Web Services would have chilled out in the month before its big Re:Invent conference. After all, that show, which takes place at the end of November, is when the cloud provider typically shows off a bonanza of new products and features.

But Christmas has come early in October, at least for people who are looking to run hybrid cloud deployments with AWS. Here’s the rundown of important news you may have missed. 

VMware and Amazon team up

The big bombshell for the month was a partnership between AWS and VMware. The latter company is going to launch a managed service that will make it easy for users to migrate workloads from on-premises hardware to the public cloud and back again, using VMware’s vSphere management software.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

AWS October roundup: Hybrid deployments with Amazon’s cloud get a boost

You might think Amazon Web Services would have chilled out in the month before its big Re:Invent conference. After all, that show, which takes place at the end of November, is when the cloud provider typically shows off a bonanza of new products and features.

But Christmas has come early in October, at least for people who are looking to run hybrid cloud deployments with AWS. Here’s the rundown of important news you may have missed. 

VMware and Amazon team up

The big bombshell for the month was a partnership between AWS and VMware. The latter company is going to launch a managed service that will make it easy for people to migrate workloads from on-premises hardware to the public cloud and back again, using VMware’s vSphere management software.

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CIO Cloud Computing

The enterprise wish-list for the hybrid cloud

If you know how to drive one car, you know how to drive pretty much any car. The gas pedal is always on the right and brake on the left. Push the turn signal up to go right and down to go left. Whether it’s a Ford or a Toyota, you don’t need to relearn how to drive each car.

Public cloud should be the same way, argues Bob Wysocki, CTO of Digital Infrastructure for General Electric and a member of the Open Networking User Group (ONUG). This week at ONUG’s annual fall meeting in New York a key theme is making it easier for enterprises to use public IaaS cloud services. Earlier this year ONUG created a new Hybrid Cloud Working Group that has created a sort of wish-list of what enterprise customers from GE, Pfizer, Citigroup and Gap would like to see from public cloud vendors to achieve easier usability.

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Network World Cloud Computing

The trouble with the hybrid cloud

Ask industry analysts about enterprise cloud adoption, and they’ll tell you that it’s all about hybrid. Sure, startups might build entirely on the public cloud, but no large enterprise is going to move everything wholesale to AWS, Azure, or Google Cloud.

Instead, they’ll build some sort of private cloud, create new stuff on (and/or migrate some old stuff to) the public cloud, and closely integrate the two — the definition of the hybrid cloud.

The question is, if you need a private cloud to have a hybrid cloud, where are all the private clouds? I’m not talking about merely well-managed virtualization. At a bare minimum, I mean self-service capabilities so that developers can provision their own VMs (and these days, run containers on top of them). At the high end, I mean production implementations that operate at large scale.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Private, public, or hybrid: Microsoft’s cloud flavors

Every cloud in the sky is unique, as is every computing cloud. Microsoft has its own view of what its cloud is all about, what it’s made of, and the tools it provides to help connect Microsoft-powered private clouds with Microsoft Azure public clouds with service clouds (from third parties).

Having multiple options as to where your cloud services reside provides real agility should you need or want it.

But some organizations may not want it. For example, you may require complete control over your data and data compliance — for example, to satisfy regulations. In those cases, Microsoft’s options let you create a private cloud using Windows Server 2016 and Microsoft System Center.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IBM unveils z13s mainframe focused on security and hybrid clouds

IBM has unveiled its new z13s mainframe, which it claims offers encryption at twice the speed as previous mid-range systems, without compromising performance

The company, which sold its x86 server business to Lenovo, continues to invest in new designs of its mainframe to handle new compute challenges. It launched in January last year, the z13, its first new mainframe in almost three years, with a new processor design, faster I/O and the ability to address up to 10TB of memory. The design of the z13 was focused on real-time encryption and embedded analytics.

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CIO Cloud Computing

VMware’s new management tools are hybrid, hybrid, hybrid

VMware has been on a news blitz this week, announcing updates to many of its management products and one specific focus has been on enabling hybrid cloud computing.

The company has a stronghold in its compute virtualization software based on vSphere, but as more enterprises use public cloud services, VMware is extending the support of its management tools to include off-premises resources. VMware hopes that any customer looking to use Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure or Google Cloud Platform will choose the company’s vRealize Suite to centrally manage their on-premises virtualized environments and the public cloud.

VRealize Suite combines management software products, such as the newly updated vRealize Operations 6.2, which is meant to be a portal for monitoring and managing a virtual environment. It gives users a central view into all of the virtualized resources in an environment, allowing issues to be resolved and compliance monitoring to be done from a single interface.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

How hybrid will reshape the entire cloud market

Sinclair Schuller is the CEO and cofounder of Apprenda, a leader in enterprise Platform as a Service.

When the phrase “hybrid cloud” is mentioned, some technologists will tell you it is the eventual end state of cloud computing, while other technologists chuckle. Those that chuckle typically view hybrid as a phrase used by vendors and customers who have no cloud strategy at all. But hybrid is real and here to stay. Not only is it here to stay, but the hybrid cloud will also reshape cloud computing forever.

People today imagine public cloud to be an “amorphous, infinitely scalable computing ether.” They think moving to the cloud rids themselves of the need to detail with computing specificity and that cloud makes you location, risk and model independent. They think enterprises that move to the cloud no longer need to depend on pesky IT departments and deal with risks associated with centralized computing. This perception of computing independence and scale couldn’t be further from the truth.

The promise of cloud is one where anyone who needs compute and storage can get it in an available, as-needed, and robust manner. Cloud computing providers have perfected availability to the point where, even with occasional mass outages, they outperform the service-level agreements (SLAs) of internal IT departments. This does come at a cost, however.

Cloud computing is arguably the largest centralization of technology the world has ever seen and will see. For whatever reason, many people don’t immediately realize that the cloud is centralized, something that should be heavily scrutinized. Possibly because the marketing behind cloud can be vague and lacking a description of a tangible “place.” Don’t be fooled.

When an enterprise selects a cloud vendor, they’re committing to that provider in a meaningful way. As applications are built for or migrated to a cloud, switching cost gets very high. The nature of this market is driven by a network effect where, assuming all else is equal, each prospective customer of a cloud provider (AWS, Microsoft, etc.) benefits by consuming a cloud that has many of customers over one that has fewer since it indicates lower risk and helps drive the economies that make a given cloud attractive.

If we play this future out, we’ll likely see the cloud infrastructure market collapse to just a few massive, global providers. This will partly be driven by success of the individual providers and the consolidation of smaller players who have great technology but simply can’t compete at that scale. Just take a look at the acquisition of Virtustream by EMC just prior to Dell’s acquisition of EMC for a recent example.

A look at recent market share estimates show exactly that, with Amazon, Microsoft, IBM, and Google accounting for 50 percent of the global cloud infrastructure market. One day, these five vendors will likely account for 80 percent of the market. Compare that to the often-criticized banking world, where despite the massive size of today’s banks, the list of banks that hold 50 percent of global deposits is much longer than just five banks. If we applied the same standard to cloud computing, we’d certainly be infuriated and demanding that these “too big to fail” computing providers be broken up.

To be clear, I’m not suggesting that what’s happening is bad or that public cloud is bad, but rather to point out the realistic state of cloud computing and the risk created by centralizing control to just a few providers. Cloud would likely never have succeeded without a few key companies making massive bets. The idea of a truly decentralized, global cloud would likely have been the wrong starting point.

Let’s explore the idea that a global decentralized cloud, or something more decentralized than what we have now, is the likely end state. Breaking up cloud providers isn’t necessary or optimal. Unlike banking, technology is capable of layers of abstraction to mitigate these sorts of centralized risks.

Most large enterprises looking to adopt cloud are making two large considerations in their decision process:

  1. They can’t shut down their entire IT department and replace it with cloud. There are many practical reasons why this is unlikely.
  2. Many are keenly aware of the risks associated with depending on a single vendor for all their cloud computing needs.

The first consideration makes it difficult to adopt a public cloud without at least considering how to reconcile the differences with on-premises, and the second makes it difficult to choose one provider at a level that is incompatible with another provider. The result of centralization in public cloud providers and looking for symmetry between off- and on-premises computing strategies is driving enterprises to explore (and in some cases demand) hybrid capabilities in layers that abstract away infrastructure. In fact, hybrid has transformed to be synonymous with multi-cloud.

Technical layers like enterprise PaaS software platforms and Cloud Management Platforms have evolved to allow for multi-cloud capabilities to cater to a modality where resources are abstract. Over the coming years, we’ll likely see multi-cloud features in these technology layers to lead to a much more decentralized computing model where something like a PaaS layer will fuse resources from public clouds, on-premises infrastructure, and regional infrastructure providers into logical clouds.

At least in the enterprise space, “private clouds” will really be an amalgam of resources and will behave as the single, “amorphous ether” that we tend to assign cloud to begin with. The cloud market will not be one where five vendors control all the compute and customers are at the mercy of the vendors. Instead, cloud will be consumed through multi-cloud layers that will protect customers from inherent centralization risk. The end state is a decentralized model with control points owned by the customer through software – a drastic reshaping to say the least.

How hybrid will reshape the entire cloud market originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

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Cloud

IBM Watson Ecosystem Strengthen The Hybrid Cloud Capabilities

IBM hybrid cloud 300x199 IBM Watson Ecosystem Strengthen The Hybrid Cloud CapabilitiesIBM has introduced new hybrid cloud capabilities for Watson to help companies to connect their data with web applications in the cloud. Watson Hybrid Cloud solution will use Watson Explorer as the default platform for application development, combining enterprise data sources in the application through a scalable environment that keep local and private data secure.

With the new hybrid cloud capabilities, users can more quickly extract business intelligence from data housed in multiple environments – traditional or cloud. In addition, IBM has announced the addition of 270 new partners to the ecosystem of Watson, as well as new specialized cognitive apps in different sectors such as entertainment, energy, health and tourism in order to save time, risk, and ensure regulatory compliance.

Cognitive application developers often face the challenge of where to locate the data and can not move them all to a public cloud for different reasons, either because of their huge amount, or by privacy requirements, regulations or security. Using the IBM hybrid cloud capabilities, users can quickly extract business intelligence data hosted securely in multiple environments.

The platform allows companies to develop applications in seconds and with minimal configuration. Watson Hybrid Cloud solution will use Watson Explorer as the default platform for application development, combining enterprise data sources in the application through a scalable environment that keep local and private data securely.

IBM Watson Analytics automates some steps of the analysis, such as data preparation, predictive analysis and visualization in an understandable way for different departments within a company, such as marketing, sales, operations, finance and human resources.

IBM has also renewed its portfolio with new products that allow companies to integrate hybrid cloud solutions in their organization, and meet new workloads generated by the rise of mobile, social and analytical technologies. The new IBM Power Systems, IBM Spectrum Storage, IBM Systems z, IBM Middleware, IBM SoftLayer and OpenStack software, promise to help customers easier navigation between these environments and more valuable for the development of business information.

Last month, IBM launched a new division called IBM Watson Health allowing patients, physicians, researchers and insurance sectors to deal effectively with health data. The unit offers a secure platform for open cloud for doctors, researchers, insurance companies and solution-oriented health and wellness, allowing anonymity to share and combine data concerning health companies.

MarketsandMarkets, the consulting and market research firm, has estimated that the growth of hybrid cloud will reach about $ 84.67 billion in 2019. The results of this study show the increasing adoption of the hybrid cloud computing model.

The main features of the hybrid cloud computing model are the standards and shared services, packaged solutions, self-service, scalable, price based on use, accessible via the Internet, standard UI technologies and publishing services and API, which result in a more efficient use of IT assets , greater agility to launch new services and greater cost efficiency.


CloudTimes

After fumbling public clouds, VMware focuses on hybrid clouds

From what company officials said this week at EMC VMware’s annual VMworld conference held in San Francisco, you’d think that its public cloud vCloud Air was in the same market tier as Amazon Web Services or Microsoft Azure. It’s not.

vCloud Air simply doesn’t come up in my conversations with organizations looking to move some, most, or all servers to the cloud. AWS and Azure do.

VMware’s hybrid capabilities

There’s no point to dwell on missing the public cloud infrastructure. Instead, it appears VMware will focus on the market where it currently has traction, meaning in the data center. Thus, what VMware described this week were hybrid capabilities in its cloud offerings to extend an organization’s data center to the public cloud without compromising security and compliance features.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Public, Private, Hybrid? Choosing the Right Cloud Mix

Public, Private, Hybrid? Choosing the Right Cloud Mix
Identifying which IT operations are candidates for cloud deployment is just the first step; organizations also have to decide whether they want their applications hosted in a public, private or hybrid cloud environment. Each model offers its own …
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10 Online Cloud Computing Courses To Get Ahead
With this much money being directed at cloud computing, businesses' need for staff with cloud skills has led to an increased number of training courses related to the field. In particular online courses, which provide valuable skills in the learner's …
Read more on InformationWeek

Microsoft woos startups with 0K in cloud computing credits
Microsoft is trying to lure more startups onto its Azure cloud services by offering a substantial $ 120,000 credit for companies that qualify for its BizSpark Plus program. Starting July 1, qualifying companies will receive $ 10,000 worth of Azure …
Read more on Computerworld

Brace yourselves: Public cloud is coming. When? Er… soon, possibly
Widespread uptake of the public cloud is not happening anytime soon, despite strong growth from the likes of Amazon Web Services, it added. However, this is up from IaaS/PaaS accounting for just three per cent of the total infrastructure services …
Read more on The Register