If AWS is serious about Kubernetes, here’s what it must do

Amazon Web Services has joined the “Anyone-but-AWS” club, pledging its support to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation to better align with the Kubernetes crowd. It’s not as if the cloud giant had much of a choice: As much as AWS wanted to ignore Kubernetes into obsolescence, the gravitational pull around Kubernetes is simply too strong. Although most people view the CNCF announcement as a big endorsement for Kubernetes, AWS has been far cagier, offering precious little information on what it plans to do.

The big question is just how far Amazon will go to support the open source project voted most likely to “take down AWS,” as WS02 CEO Sanjiva Weerawarana? said. Here is what AWS must do: Build a Kubernetes service.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Here’s why Microsoft and Google have the same competitor as a partner

It sounds like the start of a bad joke: executives from Microsoft, Google, Amazon and IBM walk into a conference with one thing in common. But all of those companies are appearing on stage at BoxWorks in San Francisco, in part because they all work with the cloud storage and content services company in one capacity or another.

Box works with Microsoft to integrate its products with Office 365, Amazon to host services in different cloud data centers, and IBM on new applications, services and sales. Google is the newest addition to that club — the two companies announced Wednesday that they’re working on storing Google Docs, Sheets and Slides files inside Box.  

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Network World Cloud Computing

Here’s why Microsoft and Google have the same competitor as a partner

It sounds like the start of a bad joke: executives from Microsoft, Google, Amazon and IBM walk into a conference with one thing in common. But all of those companies are appearing on stage at BoxWorks in San Francisco, in part because they all work with the cloud storage and content services company in one capacity or another.

Box works with Microsoft to integrate its products with Office 365, Amazon to host services in different cloud data centers, and IBM on new applications, services and sales. Google is the newest addition to that club — the two companies announced Wednesday that they’re working on storing Google Docs, Sheets and Slides files inside Box.  

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CIO Cloud Computing

Here’s how NASCAR is digitizing race day

When cars left the starting line at Sonoma Raceway in California on Sunday for the start of the Toyota/Save Mart 350, they were taking part in the launch of a product designed to help NASCAR officials monitor and manage the 110-lap race.

New race management software that NASCAR launched on Sunday is designed to give officials a single screen to watch where cars are on the racetrack, manage penalties and share information with racing teams about what’s going on.

It arose from a partnership between NASCAR and Microsoft that started in 2014. It began with a mobile inspection app that let race officials see whether cars were in compliance with all the rules about how they have to be constructed.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Cloud security is good, but here’s how to make it better

This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter’s approach.

More than a third of businesses in the United States currently use the cloud, but by 2020 that number is expected to more than double to a whopping 80%. But even though the cloud is secure, it doesn’t guarantee immunity from data breaches. Now that the cloud is rapidly becoming a mainstream part of IT, businesses must think more critically about how to bolster their security beyond cloud providers’ default security infrastructure—which often proves to be inadequate for the changing face of business.

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Network World Cloud Computing

ISO 27018 compliance: Here’s what you need to know

You’re negotiating a contract for cloud services. To clinch the deal, the cloud provider’s rep leans across the table, fixes her gaze and tells you, “By the way, the service is certified ISO 27018 compliant.”

ISO 270-what? Should you sign, or step back? IT execs will be increasingly faced with just such a choice, thanks to the advent of the ISO 27018 standard for protecting personally identifiable information (PII) in the cloud, which was adopted by the International Standards Organization (ISO) in July 2014.

With data breaches, the loss of PII and identity theft continuing without letup, any measures to stem the tide are of great interest to the IT community. Even so, only Microsoft and Dropbox thus far have announced ISO 27018-compliant cloud services. Microsoft certified its Azure cloud service, Dynamics CRM and ERP cloud-based applications and Office 365 cloud-based business productivity applications in February 2015. Dropbox announced in April 2015 that Dropbox for Business had been certified. Considering the universe of cloud providers and their services, it’s a small beginning, but most observers believe it’s just a matter of time until most if not all cloud providers announce compliance with the standard.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing