Serverless computing may kill Google Cloud Platform

Google, which has had to claw its way back into cloud relevance in the shadows of Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure, suddenly finds itself playing catchup again, thanks to the rise of serverless computing. Although Google Cloud Platform still trails AWS and Azure by a considerable margin in general cloud revenue, its strengths in AI and container infrastructure (Kubernetes) have given it a credible seat at the cloud table.

Or would, if the world weren’t quickly moving toward a serverless future.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Google launches Cloud IoT Core service for enterprises

Google today unveiled a cloud platform service to help organizations collect vital data from billions of Internet of Things devices.

The service, Google Cloud IoT Core, is designed to help enterprises, including utilities and transportation agencies, securely connect globally distributed devices to the Google Cloud Platform. There, the data can be centrally managed and integrated with Google’s data analytics services, said Indranil Chakraborty, cloud product manager at Google.

One customer who has been testing the new service for two months is Energyworx, a company of 40 workers that has used Google cloud services since 2014. Energyworx provides data analytics to utilities to help them plan better and improve performance.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

2 useful Google Docs features you probably aren’t using

Google Docs may be known as the “lightweight” word processor, but that doesn’t mean it’s lacking in advanced productivity features.

Even with the once-touted add-ons for Android program apparently in limbo, Google Docs has some handy and easily overlooked options for making your mobile or desktop-based document work a little bit easier.

Two such examples I myself forgot about up until recently and then was delighted to rediscover:

1. Explore: Intelligent in-document multitasking

Ever find yourself editing a document on your phone and needing to get more info about a particular subject? Google Docs’ Explore is just the thing you want.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Google will try to combat fake news using search and user feedback

Google might not be as responsible for the spread of fake news as social media, but the search giant is still doing something about it: burying known sources of fake news, and letting users weigh in, too.

Google frequently tweaks the algorithms that return relevant search results, sometimes privately, and other times publicly. In this case, Google announced Tuesday that about 0.25 percent of all daily search results have been returning “offensive or clearly misleading content,” and those results will be pushed lower in search results in favor of more authoritative results. 

Google is also implementing Feedback links for users to report on the accuracy of autocomplete search queries and Featured Snippet text.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

Why Google BigQuery excels at BI on big data concurrency

Network World Cloud Computing

Google April Fool’s jokes for 2017 – graded for additional humor

Tech companies like to get into April Fool’s day – those whimsical titans of capitalism – and nobody gets into it in a bigger way than Google, which rolls out a solid handful of gags every year, some of which are even interactive.

This year is no exception, as the search titan deploys its finest humor modules to delight us for a day before going back to trying to manage all the information on earth in a totally non-creepy way.

ALSO ON NETWORK WORLD:  White House to issue commemorative solar eclipse safety glasses

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

IBM chases Google, Microsoft with Kubernetes in the cloud

It’s only a matter of time before every major cloud vendor offers a version of Kubernetes as a service. Now it’s IBM’s turn.

This morning IBM announced the next logical step in its work with Docker containers: Kubernetes support on its Bluemix Container Service. Currently available in a limited beta, its feature set should match Google’s and Microsoft’s offerings.

Kubernetes, the Bluemix way

Previously, the default for managing Docker containers on Bluemix Container Service was to spin them up individually by hand or to use Bluemix’s container groups metaphor, where Bluemix directly managed multiple containers running the same image.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Google offers new ‘Always Free’ cloud tier to attract users

Google is letting its customers get a taste of its cloud for free, without a time-limited trial. The company quietly launched a new “Always Free” tier on Thursday that lets people use small amounts of its public cloud services without charge, beyond the company’s limited-time trial.

The tier includes—among other things—1 f1-micro compute instance, 5 GB per month of Regional Storage and 60 minutes per month of access to the Cloud Speech API. Using the free tier requires users to provide a credit card that Google can automatically bill for any use over the limits.

In addition, the cloud provider expanded its free trial so that users get $ 300 in credits that they can use for up to 12 months. Google will halt users’ workloads if they eat up all of the credits before the end of 12 months.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Google offers new ‘Always Free’ cloud tier to attract users

Google is letting its customers get a taste of its cloud for free, without a time-limited trial. The company quietly launched a new “Always Free” tier on Thursday that lets people use small amounts of its public cloud services without charge, beyond the company’s limited-time trial.

The tier includes — among other things — 1 f1-micro compute instance, 5 GB per month of Regional Storage and 60 minutes per month of access to the Cloud Speech API. Using the free tier requires users to provide a credit card that Google can automatically bill for any use over the limits.

In addition, the cloud provider expanded its free trial so that users get $ 300 in credits that they can use for up to 12 months. Google will halt users’ workloads if they eat up all of the credits before the end of 12 months.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Love Google? You might be ditching Slack for Hangouts Chat soon

In the Google ecosystem, there’s only a small amount of overhead.

Google Docs loads quickly, and it’s a click away from Gmail. When you need a file, it’s easy to grab one on Google Drive. For business users, this has proved to be an efficient workflow suite. I use it on a daily basis, and the one thing that always impresses me is how quickly and efficiently it all works.

Now, Google is releasing a powerful new app called Hangouts Chat, which is similar to Slack, Convo, and Microsoft Teams (which debuts next week). It’s available as part of the G Suite platform (formerly known as Google for Work) through a gradual roll-out, although you can apply to test it as an early adopter right away. Like Microsoft Teams and the way it runs within Office 365, Chat is intended to run within the “Google world” so you can quickly share documents, spreadsheets, and presentations, swap files, start a video call, and arrange meetings.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

AWS, Microsoft and Google take different paths to the cloud

SAN FRANCISCO — An outage at Amazon Web Services Tuesday rekindled the debate about whether it is wise to rely too heavily on one cloud service provider. Such snafus are rare for AWS so CIOs worry more about the potential for vendors to turn off their service without notice.

But CIOs who bet on multiple providers often invite challenges, including committing resources to work with each vendor, said Adrian Cockcroft, vice president of cloud architecture strategy for Amazon Web Services, at this week’s WSJ CIO Network conference, which included also appearances from executives running Microsoft and Google’s cloud businesses.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

Google Cloud Search helps enterprise users find data quickly

Google is wooing enterprise customers with the forthcoming launch of a service that will let employees find information they need from multiple sources.

Cloud Search is a new service that will allow users to find content from their company email, cloud storage and directory. Directory lookup provides users not only with their colleagues’ contact details, but also information about shared files and calendar events. More than that, Cloud Search is also built to proactively help users access information they need.

When users log into Cloud Search either on the web or on their Android device, they’ll be greeted by “assist cards” that are supposed to highlight key files. At launch, those cards are built to show users files that are relevant for their upcoming calendar events, as well as those that require attention based on recent edits.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

Snap to pay Google $400M a year for cloud services

Over the next five years, the company behind Snapchat will pay Google at least $ 2 billion in cloud bills.

On Thursday, Snap revealed in a filing with the US Securities and Exchange Commission that it signed a five-year contract to pay Google at least $ 400 million a year for cloud services. That’s a steep figure, considering that Snap made roughly $ 404 million last year. 

In return for the massive commitment, Snap will receive reduced pricing, though it’s not clear how deep the company’s discounts will be. Sinking a bunch of money into Google Cloud makes sense, because Snapchat began its life built on top of Google’s AppEngine platform-as-a-service offering.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Google upgrades G Suite with tools for IT pros

Google today bolstered its G Suite of productivity apps with new controls and tools for IT professionals. G Suite administrators now have more access to control security key enforcement, data control with data loss prevention (DLP) for Google Drive and Gmail, and additional insights by connecting Gmail to BigQuery, Google’s enterprise data warehouse designed to enable SQL queries, according to Google.

All of the changes, which are live today, are designed to elevate G Suite for the enterprise, especially among companies that need more confidence in the controls they can maintain over corporate data, according to Google.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing