IDG Contributor Network: Can enterprise IT seem like a good deal again?

A few weeks ago, I sat on a panel hosted by CenturyLink on sustainability and efficiency in IT. At CenturyLink’s sunny Irvine, California, data center my co-panelists gathered ahead of going on stage and on camera. One of the panelists remarked that enterprise IT was dying—dying—slowly dying. But I believe this characterization is too broadly phrased and an inaccurate choice of words.

The enterprise’s data center paradigm has changed irrevocably. And it will progress on its change cycle as enterprises embark on fewer new builds, and trends show that market share favors the commercial data center service providers. The paradigm of public cloud puts the sometimes outmoded ways of the enterprise data centers and legacy enterprise IT into an unfavorable light. But rest assured, there are some positive signs for enterprise IT—and good results ahead—but some changes do need to occur.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

Cloud security is good, but here’s how to make it better

This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter’s approach.

More than a third of businesses in the United States currently use the cloud, but by 2020 that number is expected to more than double to a whopping 80%. But even though the cloud is secure, it doesn’t guarantee immunity from data breaches. Now that the cloud is rapidly becoming a mainstream part of IT, businesses must think more critically about how to bolster their security beyond cloud providers’ default security infrastructure—which often proves to be inadequate for the changing face of business.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

Safe Harbor’s ending makes for a good start for Cloud28+

After two months of beta testing, European enterprise app and service store Cloud28+ is open for business, making it easier for companies wanting to host their applications or data in Europe to find a home for them.

A beta test is usually a shakedown, intended to remove any lingering bugs, but for Cloud28+ it was more of a shake-up.

The Cloud28+ catalog offers European businesses around 700 infrastructure-, platform- and software-as-a-service offerings from almost 150 partners. It allows them to choose services based on price, performance, and the location where the data is hosted, among other criteria.

Barely a week after the beta test began, the first shock came, as data sovereignty and hosting location unexpectedly took on new importance for many European cloud services businesses. The European Union’s top court, asked to clarify a point of law in a case concerning Facebook in Ireland, struck down the Safe Harbor Agreement that had previously allowed businesses to export EU citizens’ personal data — that of their customers or employees, for instance — to the U.S. for processing. Those that weren’t scrambling to make new arrangements were left wondering whether they complied with EU data protection law, which requires that personal data be afforded the same level of privacy protection wherever it is processed.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing