IDG Contributor Network: Going interstellar with Microsoft Cosmos

At Microsoft’s Build developer conference last week, the company announced Cosmos DB, a new cloud database offering that, if you believe the hype, entirely changed the database game. Before reelecting on what this means for developers and organizations, it’s worth taking a look at what Cosmos is.

Cosmos is a schema-free database service built with the aim of delivering high performance, fault tolerance, automatic indexing of data and truly globally distributed scalability. Cosmos is, at least in part, the evolution of Microsoft’s previous DocumentDB offering. DocumentDB was Redmond’s first foray into the NoSQL world. And while DocumentDB was a NoSQL choice in contrast to Microsoft’s relation offerings, Cosmos DB is multi-modal, offering developers the options to store relational or non-relational data. Scott Guthrie, Microsoft’s perennially red-shirted Executive Vice President of the Cloud and Enterprise group, described Cosmos as, “the first globally distributed, multi-model database service delivering turnkey global horizontal scale out with guaranteed uptime and millisecond latency at the 99th percentile.”

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

By going private, Rackspace looks to fuel its cloud evolution

Rackspace, a company that was an early player in the cloud market, is being forced to evolve or continue to be left behind.

The cloud and web-hosting company announced today that it’s being acquired by Apollo Global Management, a U.S.-based private equity firm, and will become a private company. It’s a move analysts say will enable Rackspace to make big changes without worrying about an anxious or angry response from shareholders.

Under the $ 4.3 billion deal, Rackspace stockholders will receive $ 32 per share. The purchase is expected to be finalized in the fourth quarter, according to the company.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

What’s going on at Citrix?

Tim Walsh, senior IT Architect at the Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant in Michigan, is a happy Citrix Systems customer. But he wasn’t surprised to learn this week that the company that makes most of its revenue from virtual client computing technologies is embarking on a major restructuring that will include spinning off of its GoTo Meeting family of collaboration products.

“I never really saw where the GoTo Meeting business fit into their virtualization strategy,” said Walsh, who manages a 2,000-user deployment of Citrix XenDesktop and Citrix XenApp, two of the market’s leading desktop and application virtualization products.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing