IDG Contributor Network: The future is not the cloud or the fog: it is actually the SEA!

A casual reflection on the last few years in the evolution of the wireless network provides us all the insights necessary to reason that there is at least one final frontier coming down the road. Who can deny that the last few years have been owned by the cloud, virtualization and softwarization (if that is even a word!). Edge Computing too, which is really nothing more than the pushing of all of these concepts deep into places in the network where they have never been before. Fog computing is another term (created by Cisco) for something similar but driven in its genesis more bottom up from the many Internet of Things use cases. The bigger trend is obvious; network intelligence is distributing but where will it, can it go, beyond this?

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: The future is not the cloud or the fog: it is actually the SEA!

A casual reflection on the last few years in the evolution of the wireless network provides us all the insights necessary to reason that there is at least one final frontier coming down the road. Who can deny that the last few years have been owned by the cloud, virtualization and softwarization (if that is even a word!). Edge Computing too, which is really nothing more than the pushing of all of these concepts deep into places in the network where they have never been before. Fog computing is another term (created by Cisco) for something similar but driven in its genesis more bottom up from the many Internet of Things use cases. The bigger trend is obvious; network intelligence is distributing but where will it, can it go, beyond this?

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: The future is not the cloud or the fog: it is actually the SEA!

A casual reflection on the last few years in the evolution of the wireless network provides us all the insights necessary to reason that there is at least one final frontier coming down the road. Who can deny that the last few years have been owned by the cloud, virtualization and softwarization (if that is even a word!). Edge Computing too, which is really nothing more than the pushing of all of these concepts deep into places in the network where they have never been before. Fog computing is another term (created by Cisco) for something similar but driven in its genesis more bottom up from the many Internet of Things use cases. The bigger trend is obvious; network intelligence is distributing but where will it, can it go, beyond this?

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Apple embraces a multi-cloud future, and that’s exciting

Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: The future is not the cloud or the fog: it is actually the SEA!

A casual reflection on the last few years in the evolution of the wireless network provides us all the insights necessary to reason that there is at least one final frontier coming down the road. Who can deny that the last few years have been owned by the cloud, virtualization and softwarization (if that is even a word!). Edge Computing too, which is really nothing more than the pushing of all of these concepts deep into places in the network where they have never been before. Fog computing is another term (created by Cisco) for something similar but driven in its genesis more bottom up from the many Internet of Things use cases. The bigger trend is obvious; network intelligence is distributing but where will it, can it go, beyond this?

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: SAP sets a course for the future

At its massive customer conference held last week in Orlando, SAP made it clear that it was charting a new course for the future. In announcing Leonardo — what it calls a digital innovation system — and in interviews with company executives, the message was unambiguous: SAP is an important part of the enterprise digital transformation story.

While the messaging around Leonardo was a bit muddled and at times felt like a bucket of buzzwords, it represents a decisive step forward in its effort to transform the company from a legacy, back-office technology player into the enterprise’s digital transformation platform and enabler of choice. According to its press release, the goal of Leonardo is to, “enable customers to rapidly innovate and scale that innovation to redefine their business for the digital world.”

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Network World Cloud

IDG Contributor Network: Catching up with Adaptive Insights and ruminating over the future

I’ve written in the past about Adaptive Insights, a Silicon Valley-based company in the corporate performance management (CPM) space.

CPM is a term that describes vendors who help organizations plan and model in order to get better insights over future organizational performance. Since I last caught up with the company, they have enjoyed 30% annual growth and now have 3,500 global customers spread across all the different financial/ERP products — from Xero at the smaller end of town all the way up to SAP.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Heroku: PaaS is future of development tools

The mantra that all companies need to become software companies is starting to sound familiar. PaaS clouds are the key to making this happen, by providing the means to get customer-facing applications up and running quickly, Heroku CEO Adam Gross argued this week at a developer’s conference.

Gross said that even companies not known for producing software need to be as good at operating customer apps as Amazon, Facebook, or Google. “How are they going to absorb all that complexity and sophistication? It’s not going to be by starting at the bottom of the stack,” he said. Instead, a higher level of abstraction is needed.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Eric Schmidt sees a huge future for machine learning

The man who helped build Google from a search engine into one of the biggest and most influential companies in the world has predicted the emergence of a new computing architecture based on crowd-sourced data and machine learning.

Speaking at Google’s GCP Next cloud computing conference in San Francisco, Alphabet Chairman Eric Schmidt said the combination of crowd-sourced data and machine learning will be the basis of “every successful huge IPO” in five years.

He said the adoption of machine learning will allow companies to mine crowd-sourced data, which already provides a mass of information not previously available to companies, and improve on it.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Blockchain, its new rival, and their future in the enterprise

Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies are already starting to shake up the financial services industry. They have also got entrepreneurs thinking about other applications for the blockchain technology that underlies them, including ones that address various processes inside non-financial companies such as contracts, audits and shipping. The digital signatures that certify each transaction and the distributed, write-only online ledger that constitute the core of the blockchain tech have the potential to offer even more security in these and other areas than more traditional approaches used by businesses.

Blockchain isn’t the only game in town either. The Linux Foundation recently revealed that it is leading an open source effort to develop an alternative to bitcoin’s underlying tech. The initiative, which has been dubbed the Open Ledger Project, is being supported by a coalition of leading financial services and tech companies, including Wells Fargo, State Street, the London Stock Exchange Group, Cisco, Intel, VMware and IBM. IBM, which has been a driving force behind the project, is reportedly contributing many thousands of lines of code to it as well as considerable developer resources.

The new kid on the block will have some catching up to do with blockchain, which is already being employed in some innovative ways. Nasdaq OMX, the parent company of the NASDAQ stock exchange, wants to use the tech to oversee trades in the stock of private firms and the Securities and Exchange Commission recently approved a plan by Overstock.com that involves the online retailer issuing stock using blockchain technology. Startups such as Digital Asset Holdings and Coinbase are also looking to profit from growing interest in digital tracking and trading using the new approach.

The firms that gain traction here will get plenty of attention. Investment banking firm Magister Advisors thinks that financial institutions will be spending a total of over $ 1 billion on blockchain-related projects in 2017. And finance is just one industry where the new technology could drive significant change. In the music world, startups such as PeerTracks and Bittunes are aiming to use it to revolutionize the way music is bought and shared. And in the art world, Verisart is harnessing the blockchain to improve the way art is secured and verified.

Looking at enterprise markets, there is a huge opportunity to apply blockchain technology or other variants in any place that involves swaps, trades or exchanges. One of the most obvious applications is in contractual situations where there is a need for proof that various parties are committed to a transaction. Companies such as Block Notary and Bitproof are developing ways to bind digital signatures into the blockchain and some firms are also experimenting with the technology to create escrow contracts that hold money on account until mutual agreement is recorded.

Another area where I expect to see more activity using blockchain technology is in auditing. Deloitte is one of a number of professional services firms that is experimenting with distributed digital ledgers. Here, transactions can be posted into a blockchain, which would apply a timestamp and act as a repository. Typically, auditors only choose a sample from a set of transactions to check; but using the new approach, it may well be possible to verify a much broader range of transactions securely and cost-effectively. There are a lot of regulatory issues still to be ironed out, but the opportunity to provide certainty with significantly less friction is a compelling one.

There is also a big opportunity to use the technology to improve shipping and supply chain management. An example of a startup here is Thingchain, which is applying a bitcoin-inspired cryptosystem to multiple use cases, including proving the provenance of goods and who owns them.

Many companies are still learning about the potential of blockchain technologies, so it may be some time before we see broad adoption beyond finance. But the potential is significant—and not only in the areas that I’ve outlined above. Entrepreneurs are already exploring enterprise applications that cover everything from patent registration to recording the results of boardroom votes. Expect to see more and more businesses joining the blockchain gang in 2016 and beyond.

Martin Giles is a partner at Wing Venture Capital (@Wing_VC). He was previously a journalist with The Economist.

Blockchain, its new rival, and their future in the enterprise originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

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Cloud

BrandPost: Preparing for the workplace of the future

Millennials at the gates? Baby boomers in the drivers’ seats? The modern workplace is evolving rapidly, and technology needs to evolve along with it. As organizations transition to a dramatically different vision of tomorrow’s workplace, the CIO will play a critical role in executing on the vision. 

Embracing an increasingly virtual workplace requires more than a new technological infrastructure that is flexible enough to change when employee requirements change as well. The shift requires CIOs to play a role in addressing the generational divide between millennials and the more “experienced” members of the workforce. As the first fully digital generation, millennials often have a more natural affinity to technology than some of their co-workers. But they also may lack communication and other skills, which can create tension with colleagues.

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CIO Cloud Computing

No, containers are not the future of the cloud

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Microsoft, losing the mobile race, see its future in the cloud

If mobile and cloud are the two key technology markets of the future, it’s good that Microsoft seems to have a handle on at least one of them.

When the company reported its quarterly financial results Thursday, something stuck out of its statistics: phone hardware revenue had dropped 58 percent year over year, something the company blamed on an “updated strategy.” 

It’s a nice little turn of phrase that belies Microsoft’s shift in focus away from operating Nokia’s devices business like the Finnish handset maker used to, with a wide range of phones. Instead, the company is building a leaner division that will only turn out a few different handsets. That leanness is meant literally: earlier this year, Microsoft cut the employment of 7,800 people, primarily in the phone hardware division. 

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CIO Cloud Computing

Microsoft researcher: Why Micro Datacenters really matter to mobile’s future

Microsoft Research distinguished scientist Victor Bahl has been spreading the word about Micro Datacenters, also known by the adorable name “cloudlets,” as a key concept for optimizing the performance and usefulness of mobile and other networked devices via the cloud. Service providers have embraced this vision most strongly from the start, but it won’t be long before enterprise IT pros will likely do the same, Bahl says.

Here’s a more in-depth look at the What, Why and When of mDCs:

victor bahl bio Microsoft

I notice that a lot of the research you’re involved in includes not just mobility, but the cloud. Are the two inextricably linked going forward?

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Network World Cloud Computing

Future Media Concepts Announces Adobe Video World Conference and Expo



Adobe Video World Conference


Future Media Concepts, the nation’s leading training provider and conference organizer in the digital media industry, is pleased to announce the return of the Premiere Pro World and After Effects World conferences. For the first time, the events will take place during the same week—Nov. 17-22, 2015—under the umbrella of Adobe Video World.

Organized in close conjunction with Adobe, the conference is designed for Adobe® Premiere® Pro CC and Adobe After Effects® CC professional users and creatives, including tracks for those who are switching from other pro video tools. Adobe Video World will take place on November 17-22, 2015 in San Jose, California.

Adobe Video World will kick off with four full days of sessions for the Premiere Pro World section of the event (Nov. 17-20), followed by four full days of sessions for the After Effects World program (Nov. 19-22). A two-day overlap (Nov. 19-20) is planned to allow the two communities to interact with each other during evening social events and the Expo Night. Hundreds of attendees are expected.

The Adobe Video World program is created for intermediate and advanced video, VFX and motion graphics professionals. Each of the two conference sections is four days long, and includes four tracks with more than 50 sessions to choose from.

“The need for quality training has motivated us to design an ambitious program. We are glad to host both the Adobe Premiere Pro CC and the After Effects CC teams at Adobe Video World. In addition to the many great sessions and keynotes, we know the interaction between the Adobe team members and creative professionals will be particularly valuable to our attendees,” stated Ben Kozuch, President and Co-founder of Future Media Concepts.

Attendees will have the opportunity to spend a full day in the company of Adobe Premiere Pro CC (Nov. 19) and Adobe After Effects CC (Nov. 20) teams, and hear from Adobe app developers, designers and engineers who will join onsite. The schedule includes unique keynote presentations, discussions breakouts and lunch with the Adobe teams.

“Adobe customers always like the opportunity to get together to share ideas, tips and showcase their creative projects,” said Anita Engelman, head of product marketing for Adobe Creative Cloud in the Video segment. “Adobe Video World is the start of an educational and interactive experience that will foster community by bringing together creatives who rely on, or are switching to, Adobe Premiere Pro CC and Adobe After Effects CC.”

Adobe Video World sessions will be led by renowned After Effects and Premiere Pro experts including Ben Radatz, David Simons, Richard Harrington, Eran Stern, Mathias Möhl, Luisa Winters, Jeff Greenberg, Mikey Borup, EJ Hassenfratz, and more.

Adobe Video World offers limited seats and interested attendees are encouraged to register early. Conference packages start at $ 995. Early Bird pricing ends August 1, 2015. For more information, visit adobevideoworld.com.

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About Future Media Concepts, Inc.

Established in 1994, Future Media Concepts (FMC) is the nation’s premier digital media training organization providing manufacturer-authorized training in digital video and film editing, motion graphics, web design and development, sound design, 3D animation, desktop publishing, architectural and mechanical design, Mac IT, and mobile apps development.

Future Media Concepts is a leading producer of education-rich conferences, many of which take place at today’s leading electronic entertainment trade shows. Some of our events include Editors Retreat and Post|Production World at NAB Show. For a complete list of conferences, visit fmctraining.com.






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