Oracle refreshes entire SaaS line, aiming to fuel cloud momentum

As the migration of enterprises to the cloud picks up steam, Oracle is intent on keeping up. It has taken to refreshing its SaaS applications twice a year, bringing them up to feature parity with its on-premises software and adding brand-new features for e-commerce and internet-centric supply chain management.

Oracle Cloud Applications Release 13, announced Wednesday, is the newest iteration of the company’s cloud-based business applications. It upgrades the user interface across all the apps and delivers new capabilities for supply chain management (SCM), ERP, human capital management (HCM) and the CX Cloud Suite for customer experience management.

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CIO Cloud Computing

By going private, Rackspace looks to fuel its cloud evolution

Rackspace, a company that was an early player in the cloud market, is being forced to evolve or continue to be left behind.

The cloud and web-hosting company announced today that it’s being acquired by Apollo Global Management, a U.S.-based private equity firm, and will become a private company. It’s a move analysts say will enable Rackspace to make big changes without worrying about an anxious or angry response from shareholders.

Under the $ 4.3 billion deal, Rackspace stockholders will receive $ 32 per share. The purchase is expected to be finalized in the fourth quarter, according to the company.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: No IPO, debt funding instead. Intacct gets some fuel

Cloud ERP vendor Intacct last week announced that it has secured debt funding by way of a $ 40 million facility from Silicon Valley Bank. This comes at the same time as Intacct announced year-on-year new bookings increasing by some 34 percent.

Intacct has an interesting job in front of it — it is a mid-market vendor and therefore fills the space between tools designed for small and mid-sized businesses (QuickBooks and Xero, for example) and more enterprise-focused tools such as NetSuite, SAP, and Oracle. The mid-market space is a difficult one — customers have a plethora of different requirements and often the complexity, if not the budgets, are similar to those of larger enterprise organizations.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing