Takeway.com to increase commission rates from Jan 1

(Reuters) – Dutch meal delivery firm Takeaway.com said it would increase its commission rates from Jan. 1 and that it expects this to have a 5 percent positive effect on its revenue growth.

Takeaway.com also plans to increase investments in Germany and other markets in the fourth quarter of 2017, it said in its third-quarter trading update on Tuesday.

Reporting by Camille Raynaud; Editing by Subhranshu Sahu

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Tech

Tesla shares fall from record high after warning from analyst

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Shares of Tesla (TSLA.O) fell from record highs on Tuesday after an analyst warned that the electric car maker may take longer than expected to become profitable.

Jefferies analyst Philippe Houchois launched coverage of Tesla with an “underperform” rating, helping send shares of the company headed by entrepreneur billionaire Elon Musk down 2.17 percent to $ 376.74 after closing at a record high the day before.

“Achievements to-date and vision are impressive, but we don’t think Tesla’s vertically integrated business model can be scaled up as profitably and quickly as consensus thinks and valuation multiples imply,” Houchois warned in a research note.

Houchois’ $ 280 price target was well below the median analyst price target of $ 337.50, according to Thomson Reuters data.

Musk is counting on the recently launched Model 3, Tesla’s least pricey car, to make the Palo Alto, California company profitable and establish it as the leading electric carmaker ahead of BMW (BMWG.DE), General Motors (GM.N) and other long-established players.

Wall Street’s confidence in Musk has sent Tesla’s stock up 83 percent over the past year to record highs.

Skeptics believe Tesla’s aggressive production targets are unrealistic, that Musk is burning through cash too quickly and that the company’s electric cars will be overtaken by larger automakers.

Eight analysts recommend buying Tesla’s stock, while another eight recommend selling, and eight others have neutral ratings, according to Thomson Reuters data. That makes Tesla one of the 10 most poorly-rated stocks in the Nasdaq 100 index.

Reporting by Noel Randewich; editing by Diane Craft

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Tech

Cloud computing reversal: From ‘go away’ to ‘I can’t miss out’

Isaac Asimov once said, “I do not fear computers. I fear the lack of them.” That quote has stuck with me to this day. There’s no doubt that computers and computing have changed our lives. Without them, we would be slaves to processes and paper.

I was reminded of Asimov’s quote when I saw the results of a recent poll done by Comvault of 100 IT leaders. More than two thirds said that they were worried about keeping up to date with the latest products and iterations across the major cloud providers. In other words, they fear missing out.

About a quarter (24 percent) of those polled said they were a cloud-only organization, which perhaps means they are very small or very new businesses. Additionally, 32 percent said they are cloud-first, with plans to become cloud-only, so they are likely mid-sized businesses. Also, 6 percent said they did not have a specific migration plan, which means they are BDCs (big dumb companies).

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: An under-pressure OpenStack gets support from an (in)famous individual

Last week saw a few thousand devoted OpenStack community members flock to Boston to take part in the bi-annual OpenStack Summit. This summit marks a major turning point for the initiative. Since we all congregated in Barcelona last year, there have been some major pieces of news which have rocked the community. Only a couple of weeks before the event, Intel pulled out of a partnership with Rackspace to build an OpenStack-based test facility, and OpenStack poster boy Mirantis pivoted from a pure OpenStack strategy to one covering a number of open source initiatives.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

3 takeaways from Red Hat’s AWS deal for OpenShift

Red Hat and Amazon have long been framed as rivals, but only in the sense that anyone who provides on-prem Linux and PaaS products competes to some degree with a cloud provider. Really, they’re more like peanut butter and jelly.

Yesterday, Red Hat unveiled details about a new partnership with Amazon to support integrating some widely used AWS options into Red Hat’s OpenShift PaaS. The list of services covers basic infrastructure (AWS Route 53, AWS Cloudfront), data (AWS Redshift/Aurora/Athena), and cutting-edge technologies (AWS Lambda).

Here are three reasons why offering those services with OpenShift is big for Red Hat and its customers—and how it could potentially be big for other cloud vendors too.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

How IBM wants to bring blockchain from Bitcoin to your data center

At its InterConnect conference in Las Vegas this week, IBM is announcing new features for its open source cloud-hosted blockchain service in an attempt to bring this distributed database technology from its initial use of powering Bitcoin to a broader market, including the financial services industry.

Blockchain is a distributed database that maintains a continually growing list of records that can be verified using hashing techniques. Vendors such as IBM and Microsoft are attempting to commercialize it by offering customers a platform for hosting their own implementations. Analysts say the market to do so is just emerging.

IBM has supported blockchain implementations for more than a year, but this week the company is announcing a beta version 1.0 of its service, which is based off the open source Hyperledger Fabric – a Linux Foundation project. It’s available in IBM’s Bluemix Cloud. IBM says Hyperledger can process up to 1,000 transactions per second.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Lessons learned from the recent AWS S3 outage

Amazon S3 underpins many AWS services, including AWS Lambda, Elastic BeanStalk, and Amazon’s own Service Health Dashboard. It also serves as an object and media store for many other internet services that rely on it every day.

On February 28th, 2017 AWS experienced an hours long outage of the Amazon S3 Service in US-EAST–1 region. That created a cascading effect of outages across a good chunk of the internet, including services like Dockerhub.

A human error turned out to be the root cause:

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

IBM is on a push to offer IoT from development to production

The internet of things is so complex that some enterprises would rather turn to one vendor to determine the business case for an IoT deployment, design the system, roll it out, and operate it as a service.

At least that’s what IBM believes. The company’s combining several of its products and services into what it calls the IoT Solutions Practice. The move, announced Monday, is designed so customers can find all of IBM’s IoT offerings in one place.

Turning IoT into a service isn’t a new idea. Consultancies like Accenture and carriers like Verizon, among others, say they can reduce the complexity of adopting these systems and making them pay for themselves.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: From chatbots to Einstein, artificial intelligence as a service

The recent announcement of Salesforce Einstein — dubbed “artificial intelligence for everyone” — sheds new light on the new and pervasive usage of artificial intelligence in every aspect of businesses.

From consumer to business

Even without knowing it, the consumer world has long been using AI-based systems. Siri knows which movies are showing at what time and recommends the best theater based on the user’s location. Nest learns about household habits to optimize heating and cooling patterns. Facebook recognizes friends in photos with nearly 98 percent accuracy.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Lessons from launching billions of Docker containers

The Iron.io Platform is an enterprise job processing system for building powerful, job-based, asynchronous software. Simply put, developers write jobs in any language using familiar tools like Docker, then trigger the code to run using Iron.io’s REST API, webhooks, or the built-in scheduler. Whether the job runs once or millions of times per minute, the work is distributed across clusters of “workers” that can be easily deployed to any public or private cloud, with each worker deployed in a Docker container.

At Iron.io we use Docker both to serve our internal infrastructure needs and to execute customers’ workloads on our platform. For example, our IronWorker product has more than 15 stacks of Docker images in block storage that provide language and library environments for running code. IronWorker customers draw on only the libraries they need to write their code, which they upload to Iron.io’s S3 file storage, where our message queuing service merges the base Docker images with the user’s code in a new container, runs the process, then destroys the container.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

These are the lessons Trulia learned from building a chatbot

It’s a competitive real-estate rental market out there, and Trulia wanted to capitalize on the interest with a new Facebook Messenger bot it launched earlier this month.

The bot lets users search for rental properties and keep up to date on new properties when they become available. 

Trulia’s bot came out of a quarterly hackathon project hosted by at real estate tech firm this past May, and the company learned a lot about bot-building. The experience showed that businesses should give bot-making a shot, even if they’re not tech companies, said Yardley Ip, general manager for Trulia Rentals.

“Given that the tools are so easy to use, and it’s so lightweight to develop [a bot], I think businesses should try it,” Ip said. “At least, at minimum, from the customer service angle. Because there are frequently asked questions that users and customers have, and why not use a bot as a way to respond to your users quickly?”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

These are the lessons Trulia learned from building a chatbot

It’s a competitive real-estate rental market out there, and Trulia wanted to capitalize on the interest with a new Facebook Messenger bot it launched earlier this month.

The bot lets users search for rental properties and keep up to date on new properties when they become available. 

Trulia’s bot came out of a quarterly hackathon project hosted by at real estate tech firm this past May, and the company learned a lot about bot-building. The experience showed that businesses should give bot-making a shot, even if they’re not tech companies, said Yardley Ip, general manager for Trulia Rentals.

“Given that the tools are so easy to use, and it’s so lightweight to develop [a bot], I think businesses should try it,” Ip said. “At least, at minimum, from the customer service angle. Because there are frequently asked questions that users and customers have, and why not use a bot as a way to respond to your users quickly?”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

3 key factors missing from your cloud business case

You want to justify some IT spending for cloud-based platforms. Your CEO or board has asked for a business case, and you’ve been scrambling to create one. Of course, you’ll include obvious items like capex versus opex. However, most business cases miss three important concepts:

1. The value of agility

Yes, again. The problem with agility in a business case is that it’s hard to define, as well as hard to assign a dollar figure. Agility rarely gets into cloud business cases.

But agility should always be considered in a cloud business case, even if in the abstract. If you can scale a server cluster in seconds without driving hardware and software buying cycles, what is that worth to the business? In most cases, I suspect it’s worth a lot.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

The cloud switch is on: From migration to management

At this week’s Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference, I saw a shift in vendor focus. Last year, the big focus was migration. Whether the product was Office 365, Azure, or Dynamics, the framing was how to migrate, so many vendors offered migration tools. This year, despite a continued strong presence of migration offerings, the buzz had shifted to cloud management, typically via managed services offerings.

Rocco Seyboth, vice president of product and marketing for BitTitan (a company traditionally focused on migration), said vendors seek to shift from offering a one-time set of project services to offering recurring managed services. Being able to offer a combination of services after migration is essential for businesses to remain relevant — and keep making money.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Run, don’t walk, from China’s Big Brother law

China’s National People’s Congress has drafted a second version of a controversial cybersecurity law. It would bring a great deal of censorship for both foreign and domestic citizens and businesses, whether they use the cloud or not.

China is a wasteland for the modern internet. Websites like Facebook and Google are blocked. Moreover, web traffic is monitored and censored by the government. It’s Big Brother for real.

The latest draft of the law aims to require any site operator, whether foreign or domestic, to comply with the “social morals” of China. Moreover, they must accept government censorship.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Nvidia chief downplays challenge from Google’s AI chip

Nvidia has staked a big chunk of its future on supplying powerful graphics chips used for artificial intelligence, so it wasn’t a great day for the company when Google announced two weeks ago that it had built its own AI chip for use in its data centers.

Google’s Tensor Processing Unit, or TPU, was built specifically for deep learning, a branch of AI through which software trains itself to get better at deciphering the world around it, so it can recognize objects or understand spoken language, for example.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

A new app from SAP helps line managers keep track of their budgets

It’s not often easy for line-of-business managers to get a real-time view of their budgets and spending, but a new app from SAP aims to change that.

Based on SAP’s Hana Cloud Platform, the app pulls data from core financial reporting systems and makes it searchable, so that line managers can do ad hoc spend analyses and other on-the-fly calculations.

Called SAP RealSpend, the app lets managers drill down and perform a fine-grained analysis of actual and future spending. It can also deliver related forecast and budget plans.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Why the former CIO of Gap moved from clothes to cloud

One Big Bang digital transformation was enough for Tom Keiser. After overhauling legacy IT systems and updating ecommerce platforms, the former Gap CIO has joined SaaS provider Zendesk as its first CIO. The move comes more than a year after leaving the apparel retailer. Now Keiser will build out IT, security and data analytics capabilities for a cloud service provider seeking to top $ 1 billion in revenues by 2020.

Zendesk founder and CEO Mikkel Svane told CIO.com via email that he hired Keiser for the wealth of “enterprise technology and operations experience” he brings to a company that is entering its next stage of growth. Zendesk, which has expanded to more than 1,400 employees from fewer than 800 a year ago, sells customer service software for ecommerce call centers and help desk tools to support enterprises’ trouble-shooting needs.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

5 things to expect from Microsoft’s Build developer conference

Microsoft executives will take the stage at Moscone West in San Francisco on Wednesday for the first of two keynote addresses to the company’s big Build developer conference. Here are five key things to expect from the next two days of Microsoft announcements:

1. New features in Windows 10 for developers and end users alike

Last year, Microsoft used Build to show off its vision for developing applications to run on what was then an unreleased operating system. In the intervening year, the company released Windows 10 to the world, and people have started using it in droves.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

10 big announcements from Google’s Cloud Conference

In San Francisco this week at Pier 48, overlooking the Giants’ AT&T Ballpark, Google Cloud Platform (GCP) executives are holding a user conference to introduce products and services they hope will help make the case for choosing Google in the cloud.

Sam Charrington, a cloud and big data analyst and advisor, summed up Google executives’ pitch best this week on Twitter: “GCP exec team’s operating thesis: ‘Cloud’s not done. The industry’s just beginning the journey.”

+MORE AT NETWORK WORLD: Is Google pushing the cloud envelope too far? +

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

10 big announcements from Google’s Cloud Conference

In San Francisco this week at Pier 48, overlooking the Giants’ AT&T Ballpark, Google Cloud Platform (GCP) executives are holding a user conference to introduce products and services they hope will help make the case for choosing Google in the cloud.

Sam Cherrington, an analyst and cloud consultant, summed up Google executives’ pitch best this week on Twitter: “GCP exec team’s operating thesis: ‘Cloud’s not done. The industry’s just beginning the journey.”

Google is seen by many as being behind Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, and even IBM in the IaaS cloud market. In a new research note, Deutsche Bank investment analysts predicted that GCP is on a $ 400 million revenue run rate, which is roughly 20 times less than AWS’s.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Apple said to move part of cloud business from AWS to Google

Apple has moved some of its iCloud and services data from Amazon Web Services to Google’s cloud platform, in what is seen as a bid by the iPhone maker to diversify its cloud service providers, according to reports.

The move comes even as the company is building its own new data centers, leading to speculation whether the shift is only temporary.

Google is a rival of Apple in smartphones and other devices, but such deals are common among tech companies in areas where they don’t compete. 

After signing the deal with Google late last year, Apple has significantly reduced its reliance on AWS, whose infrastructure it has been using to run parts of iCloud and other services, reported CRN, quoting sources with knowledge of the matter. The publication put Apple’s spending with Google at between $ 400 million and $ 600 million, though it added it wasn’t clear whether the figures referred to an annual spending rate or a set amount of capacity.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Learning from the PaaS

In 2009, the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) published a draft definition of cloud computing. The NIST definition, created for government agencies buying cloud services, simplified cloud computing into three types of services: 1) IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service), where vendors offer on-demand compute, network, and storage; 2) PaaS (Platform as a Service), where vendors provide application development frameworks and deployment tools; and 3) SaaS (Software as a Service) where vendors deliver entire applications.

While IaaS and SaaS are well understood and widely adopted, PaaS has lagged behind. But I expect a massive surge in platform adoption in the next few years.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Developers get new tools from Google to analyze images

Developers can now easily build powerful applications that understand the content of images thanks to new machine vision tools released by Google.

The company unveiled the beta of its Cloud Vision API on Wednesday, giving select developers an opportunity to run advanced image processing services that let their applications more easily handle pictures. Applications can use the tools to do things like identify the most important thing in an image, determine how someone feels from their picture, and detect whether the content of an image is inappropriate. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

Why companies are switching from Google Apps to Office 365

Microsoft’s increasingly strong Office 365 performance is coming partly at the expense of Google Apps. Motorola’s recent decision to move from an elderly version of Office to Google’s cloud service bucks the more common trend of companies who have been using Google Apps switching to Office 365.

It’s not just Microsoft saying that Office 365 is growing (COO Kevin Turner claims that four out of five Fortune 500 companies use the service). Last year, cloud security company Bitglass said traffic analysis gave Google twice the market share of Office 365 among its customers, with 16.3 percent of the market; that went up to 22.8 percent this year as more companies switched to cloud services. However, over the same year, Office 365 grew far faster, from 7.7 percent to 25.2 percent. Google has a slight advantage with small businesses (22.8 percent to Microsoft’s 21.4 percent) but in large, regulated businesses (over 1,000 employees), Microsoft’s 30 percent share is twice that of Google and growing fast.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Get ready to meet Kudu, a new, open-source storage engine from Cloudera

An open-source storage engine called Kudu could soon be on the way from Cloudera, offering a new alternative for companies with big data stores to manage.

Kudu will be offered as an alternative to the popular Hadoop Distributed File System and the Hadoop-oriented HBase NoSQL database, according to a VentureBeat report, which cited a slide deck on Kudu’s design goals.

A small Cloudera team has reportedly been working on Kudu for the past two years. The company has already been pitching it to customers and plans to release it as Apache-licensed open-source software at the end of this month, VentureBeat said, citing a source familiar with the matter.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Apple drops iCloud prices, matches rival storage services from Google and Microsoft

For the second year in a row, Apple reduced prices for its expanded iCloud storage plans, putting costs in line with rivals like Google, Microsoft and Dropbox.

Apple announced changes to iCloud extra storage pricing earlier this month at the event where it unveiled new iPhones, the larger iPad Pro and a revamped Apple TV.

Although the Cupertino, Calif., company did not boost the amount of free storage space — as Computerworld speculated it might — and instead continued to provide just 5GB of iCloud space gratis, it bumped up the $ 0.99 per month plan from 20GB to 50GB, lowered the price of the 200GB plan by 25 percent to $ 2.99 monthly, and halved the 1TB plan’s price to $ 9.99.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing