The Simple Reason to Learn to Lead Yourself First

Inc. readers love leading. We love learning to lead better.

Usually that means learning to lead others. Leading others sounds sexier.

In my leadership courses and workshops, nearly everyone prefers the exercises that lead others over ones to build self-awareness and self-leadership.

I recommend learning to lead yourself first. Here’s why.

Learn to lead yourself first

To see what happens if you learn to lead others first, imagine learning a foreign language.

Say it’s Italian. With dedication and practice, you learn the language. The natural next step is to spend time with Italians, eat the cuisine, visit the country, learn their history, and so on.

Now say you learn that you prefer Chinese cuisine, history, philosophy, and so on.

After learning Italian is a lousy time to realize you’ve invested years in learning skills that will take you away from your interests.

Learning to lead yourself reveals your interests and values. It gives you direction. It keeps you from leading people where you don’t want to go.

Better to find out you love Chinese before learning Italian. No matter how good you are at Italian, it will always feel like work. Doing what you love will feel less like work all the time.

Learning to lead others is enticing and alluring. We feel powerful. More followers enables us to do more.

Without direction and purpose, power and action are as likely to lead us astray as where we want to go.

Tech

Indonesia's first ever IPO by a startup draws robust investor interest

JAKARTA (Reuters) – E-commerce firm PT Kioson Komersial Indonesia Tbk drew strong investor interest for Indonesia’s first ever IPO by a startup, and its shares surged on their trading debut in very thin volumes on Thursday.

The response to the IPO could potentially pave the way for more technology companies in Southeast Asia’s biggest economy to follow in Kioson’s footsteps and list in the domestic stock market.

Kioson raised 45 billion rupiah ($ 3.3 million) by selling 150 million shares, or 23.1 percent of the company’s total share base, at 300 rupiah each. The offering was more than 10 times over-subscribed.

The stock surged as much as 50 percent on its debut, but volumes were very thin with just over 10,000 shares traded.

Indonesia’s startup scene is booming as investors are lured by the youthful demographic of the country of 250 million people, who are increasingly buying anything from tickets to electronic gadgets online.

President Joko Widodo has also aimed to increase broadband access in the sprawling archipelago.

Kioson CEO Jasin Halim said the company previously received offers from venture capital and private equity funds, but decided to go for an IPO because of a difference in valuation.

“The path that startups take is normally to look for venture capital, angel investors and so on…We feel that by taking the IPO route, that’s the method that is the most fair and transparent,” he told reporters. “Let the market value our company.”

On top of showing that an IPO could be an alternative method to raise funds for startups in Indonesia, Kioson also offers retail investors a chance to take part in the capital market and benefit from the “hyper-growth” of startups, Halim said.

Kioson operates an “online to offline” business model, which allows customers to make online purchases and pick up their orders at the ubiquitous kiosks, locally known as “warungs”, across Indonesia.

The company had tied up with 19,000 kiosks as of September, and plans to raise that to 100,000 by 2019, Halim said.

Kioson plans to use the proceeds from its IPO mainly to acquire online vouchers firm PT Narindo Solusi Komunikasi.

Andi Boediman, co-founder of venture capital firm Ideosource, told Reuters he expects more startups to take the IPO route in Indonesia as they could get better valuations from local investors who are more familiar with their products.

“With products that are offered in Indonesia, it’s easier to build a positive perception in Indonesia than to introduce it in other countries,” said Boediman, whose venture capital firm had invested in online retailer PT Bhinneka Mentari Dimensi. (reut.rs/2yJnoHQ)

PT M Cash Integrasi, which distributes online vouchers through its physical kiosks, is also planning to raise up to 300 billion rupiah by offering a 25 percent stake in an IPO. M Cash is a unit of PT Kresna Graha Investama Tbk.

Reporting by Eveline Danubrata; Additional reporting by Cindy Silviana; Editing by Muralikumar Anantharaman

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Tech

Dubai starts tests in bid to become first city with flying taxis

DUBAI (Reuters) – Dubai staged a test flight on Monday for what it said would soon be the world’s first drone taxi service under an ambitious plan by the United Arab Emirates city to lead the Arab world in innovation.

The flying taxi developed by German drone firm Volocopter resembles a small, two-seater helicopter cabin topped by a wide hoop studded with 18 propellers.

It was unmanned for its maiden test run in a ceremony arranged for Dubai Crown Prince Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed.

Meant to fly without remote control guidance and with a maximum flight duration of 30 minutes, it comes with plenty of fail-safes in case of trouble: back-up batteries, rotors and, for a worst case scenario, a couple of parachutes.

Volocopter is in a race with more than a dozen well-funded European and U.S. firms, each with its own science fiction-inspired vision for creating a new form of urban transport that is a cross between a driverless electric car and a short-haul, vertical takeoff-and-landing aircraft.

These include aerospace giant Airbus, which aims to put a self-piloting taxi in the air by 2020; Kitty Hawk, a company backed by Google co-founder Larry Page; and Uber, which is working with partners on its own flying taxi strategy.

Dubai Crown Prince Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum is seen inside the flying taxi in Dubai, United Arab Emirates September 25, 2017. REUTERS/Satish Kumar

“Implementation would see you using your smartphone, having an app, and ordering a Volocopter to the next voloport near you. The volocopter would come and autonomously pick you up and take you to your destination,” CEO Florian Reuter said.

“It already is capable of flying based on GPS tracks today, and we will implement full sense capability, also dealing with unknown obstacles on the way,” he added, saying developers aimed to initiate the taxis within five years.

Slideshow (5 Images)

In Monday’s test flight, the device hovered upward about 200 meters and whirred for about five minutes over a windswept patch of sand astride the emirate’s Gulf coast.

Attired in crisp white robes and headdresses, Sheikh Hamdan and his entourage clapped approvingly from a nearby viewing deck as the craft alighted.

The UAE has sought to distinguish itself in a region mired in war and strife as a high-tech, forward-looking society.

It plans to send an unmanned probe to Mars by 2021, the Arab world’s first mission to space, and Dubai has in many ways led their showy march into the future by introducing the region’s first driverless metro and robot policemen prototypes.

“Encouraging innovation and adopting the latest technologies contributes not only to the country‘s development but also builds bridges into the future,” Sheikh Hamdan said in a statement.

Additional reporting by Eric Auchard; editing by Mark Heinrich

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Tech

Microsoft: Government’s data gag order practices worse than first thought

Microsoft has significantly upped the tally of U.S. government gag orders slapped on demands for customer information, according to court documents filed last week.

In a revised complaint submitted to a Seattle federal court last Friday, Microsoft said that more than half of all government data demands were bound by a secrecy order that prevented the company from telling customers of its cloud-based services that authorities had asked it to hand over their information.

The original complaint — the first round in a lawsuit Microsoft filed in April against the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) and Attorney General Loretta Lynch — had pegged the number of data demands during the past 18 months at 5,624. Of those, 2,576, or 46%, were tagged with secrecy orders that prevented Microsoft from telling customers it had been compelled to give up their information.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Moving to the cloud? First choose the right apps

Most enterprise IT shops have more than 1,000 applications they must understand or relearn before moving any of them to the cloud. You simply can’t move your apps en masse.

Why? Because some workloads make sense for the cloud, and some do not. Here’s my guide on how you can assess which are good candidates for a move to the cloud.

Key factors for determining cloud-ready applications

Good candidates for the cloud are applications that were built in the last 15 years and use a language supported by your target cloud. If you find an analogous platform for these in the cloud, your migration should be easy.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Microsoft’s Bing just called the first four primaries for Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton

In March, Microsoft said it would use its Bing technology to predict the outcome of the 2016 presidential election. On Tuesday, Microsoft jumped in with both feet, calling the first four Republican primaries for Donald Trump.

Microsoft’s Bing predicts that Trump will win the Republican primaries in Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina, and Nevada relatively easily, topping Ted Cruz in all four states. Hillary Clinton is expected to win three out of the first four Democratic primaries—Iowa, South Carolina, and Nevada—losing New Hampshire to Bernie Sanders. 

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CIO Cloud Computing