Apple Reportedly Fires Engineer After Daughter Posts iPhone X Video

There’s a reason Apple is so good at keeping secrets. Brooke Amelia Peterson says she and her father have found that out the hard way.

The younger Peterson posted a short video to YouTube from the Apple campus, apparently sometime early last week. One segment, filmed from Apple’s campus, showed off her father’s pre-release iPhone X – the highly-anticipated super-flagship phone due to be released on November 3. Peterson’s father, according to her videos, was an engineer working on radio communications and Apple Pay features for the iPhone X, pronounced “iPhone ten.”

Apple watchdogs including 9to5 Mac and Apple Insider jumped on the video, which 9to5 Mac described as “probably our best look yet at the device in action.” It included substantial glimpses of the device’s calendar app, camera, Face ID, and the new Animoji feature, as well as the physical design of the phone itself.

In a followup video posted on Saturday, though, Peterson claims that Apple reacted to the video by firing her father, who was seen cheerfully participating – despite Apple’s well-known commitment to secrecy around unreleased technology.

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In yesterday’s video, the younger Peterson was conciliatory towards Apple, acknowledging that she and her father had made a mistake.

“At the end of the day, when you work for Apple, it doesn’t matter how good of a person you are. If you break a rule, they just have no tolerance.”

“I’m not mad at Apple,” she continued. “My dad takes absolutely full responsibility for the one rule that he broke. We’re not angry, we’re not bitter.”

Details of Peterson’s story have not been independently verified, but we have reached out to Apple and will update this story with any confirmation or details.

Peterson says she took down the original video at Apple’s request, and some mirrors of the full video appear to be down as well, but copies are still surfacing both around the web and on YouTube.

Tech

Tesla Fires Hundreds of Workers After Their Annual Performance Review

They’re not layoffs, the automaker says.

Electric automaker Tesla Motors fired hundreds of employees this week, including workers at its Fremont, Calif. factory and corporate managers, as it tries to solve production problems for its recently released Model 3.

An estimated 400 to 700 people were dismissed this week, according to a San Jose Mercury News report published Friday afternoon. That’s between 1% and 2% of the company’s more than 33,000 employees. Former and current employees told the Mercury News that little or no warning preceded the dismissals.

A Tesla spokesman would not confirm that number but told Fortune that the move follows its annual performance reviews, which typically involve both involuntary and voluntary departures.

“Like all companies, Tesla conducts an annual performance review during which a manager and employee discuss the results that were achieved, as well as how those results were achieved, during the performance period,” a Tesla spokesman said in an emailed statement. “This includes both constructive feedback and recognition of top performers with additional compensation and equity awards, as well as promotions in many cases. As with any company, especially one of over 33,000 employees, performance reviews also occasionally result in employee departures. Tesla is continuing to grow and hire new employees around the world.”

Tesla insists that the losses are not layoffs and that it plans to backfill the positions. That’s likely accurate, at least for jobs in California. State law requires companies to notify employees of layoffs through its WARN notification system. There are no records of new layoffs from Tesla. About 200 Tesla and SolarCity employees in the company’s Roseville, Calif. offices were notified Aug. 30 that they would be terminated.

The latest cuts come as the automaker tries to fix bottlenecks on the production line for its Model 3, an all-electric model designed to appeal to the masses. Earlier this month, Tesla reported that it produced 260 Model 3 cars in the third quarter, of which it has delivered 220. That figure is far less than CEO Elon Musk’s prediction that Tesla would produce more than 1,600 of the vehicles by September.

In July, Musk tweeted a production update for the Model 3, saying the car had passed all regulatory requirements ahead of schedule. After announcing that the first 30 customers would receive the Model 3s on July 28, Musk wrote, “production grows exponentially, so Aug should be 100 cars and Sept above 1,500.”

Altogether, Musk said that third quarter production numbers for the Model 3 would be around 1,630 vehicles—a prediction off by 84%.

A Wall Street Journal report published earlier this month revealed that Tesla workers were assembling Model 3 vehicles by hand until at least early September. One of the “bottlenecks” Musk alluded to was a process that involved positioning and welding body panels by hand, rather than by precision robots, according to workers interviewed by the Journal.

Musk recently delayed the unveiling of an electric semi-truck until Nov. 16 so the company can focus its attention on production problems with its new mass-market car, the Model 3.

Tech

Review: Chef 12 fires up devops

Two of the most important tasks in a data center are server provisioning and configuration management. At one time, administrators spent a significant amount of time physically deploying servers and network infrastructure, followed by even more minutes and hours manually configuring hundreds or even thousands of nodes. Then they spent an additional chunk of the day troubleshooting and fixing the errors they introduced by configuring all of these systems with their fat fingers.

Chef clients are generally installed on Windows machines using the MSI package. Today, a number of resources specific to Windows come with Chef out-of-the-box. For example:

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