Google launches Cloud IoT Core service for enterprises

Google today unveiled a cloud platform service to help organizations collect vital data from billions of Internet of Things devices.

The service, Google Cloud IoT Core, is designed to help enterprises, including utilities and transportation agencies, securely connect globally distributed devices to the Google Cloud Platform. There, the data can be centrally managed and integrated with Google’s data analytics services, said Indranil Chakraborty, cloud product manager at Google.

One customer who has been testing the new service for two months is Energyworx, a company of 40 workers that has used Google cloud services since 2014. Energyworx provides data analytics to utilities to help them plan better and improve performance.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Enterprises can put Oracle’s entire public cloud in the data center

While Amazon is raking in the lion’s share of money spent by public-cloud users, Oracle is doubling down on its hybrid-cloud strategy, appealing to enterprises that want to put data and applications behind their firewall while taking advantage of cloud pricing models and technology.

Oracle has greatly expanded the services available through its on-premises Cloud at Customer offering so that they are essentially at parity with what the company has on its public cloud. The company announced Tuesday that a broad portfolio of SaaS (software as a service) applications as well as PaaS (platform as a service) and Oracle Big Data Machine services are now available via Cloud at Customer.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Enterprises can put Oracle’s entire public cloud in the data center

While Amazon is raking in the lion’s share of money spent by public-cloud users, Oracle is doubling down on its hybrid-cloud strategy, appealing to enterprises that want to put data and applications behind their firewall while taking advantage of cloud pricing models and technology.

Oracle has greatly expanded the services available through its on-premises Cloud at Customer offering so that they are essentially at parity with what the company has on its public cloud. The company announced Tuesday that a broad portfolio of SaaS (software as a service) applications as well as PaaS (platform as a service) and Oracle Big Data Machine services are now available via Cloud at Customer.

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Network World Cloud Computing

The 3 dumbest things enterprises do in the cloud

You’re going to make mistakes. I tell my enterprise clients that every week.

However, there are mistakes and there are mistakes that are more like self-inflected wounds. Here are three of the dumbest mistakes I’m now seeing enterprises make in the cloud efforts.

Dumbest mistake No. 1: Keeping the data on premises but the compute in the cloud

When helping clients plan their cloud efforts, I regularly hear, “My data is sacred, so we don’t want to put our data in the cloud. However, we’re paying too much for compute and datacenter space, so let’s place that on some public cloud.”

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

The 3 dumbest things enterprises do in the cloud

You’re going to make mistakes. I tell my enterprise clients that every week.

However, there are mistakes and there are mistakes that are more like self-inflected wounds. Here are three of the dumbest mistakes I’m now seeing enterprises make in the cloud efforts.

Dumbest mistake No. 1: Keeping the data on premises but the compute in the cloud

When helping clients plan their cloud efforts, I regularly hear, “My data is sacred, so we don’t want to put our data in the cloud. However, we’re paying too much for compute and datacenter space, so let’s place that on some public cloud.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

The 3 dumbest things enterprises do in the cloud

You’re going to make mistakes. I tell my enterprise clients that every week.

However, there are mistakes and there are mistakes that are more like self-inflected wounds. Here are three of the dumbest mistakes I’m now seeing enterprises make in the cloud efforts.

Dumbest mistake No. 1: Keeping the data on premises but the compute in the cloud

When helping clients plan their cloud efforts, I regularly hear, “My data is sacred, so we don’t want to put our data in the cloud. However, we’re paying too much for compute and datacenter space, so let’s place that on some public cloud.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

ContainerX steps into the limelight with a new container platform for enterprises

Enterprises interested in tapping container technology now have a brand-new option for managing it: ContainerX, a multitenant container-as-a-service platform for both Linux and Windows.

Launched into beta last November by a team of engineers from Microsoft, VMware and Citrix, the service became generally available in both free and paid versions on Thursday. Promising an all-in-one platform for orchestration, compute, network, and storage management, it provides a single “pane of glass” for all of an enterprise’s containers, whether they’re running on Linux or Windows, bare metal or virtual machine, public or private cloud.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IBM tackles ‘shadow IT’ with a new cloud security tool for enterprises

If there’s one thing that can strike terror into a CIO’s heart, it’s the security implications of the cloud; if there’s another, it’s the “bring your own” technology trend. Combine the two, and you’ve got the motivation behind IBM’s new Cloud Security Enforcer.

Thanks to having set up used a private email server while U.S. Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton has become a poster child for “shadow IT,” or the phenomenon by which employees bring their own technologies into the workplace, but there’s no denying its prevalence. One-third of Fortune 1000 employees share and upload corporate data on third-party cloud apps, according to a recent IBM Security study. One in four link to cloud apps using a corporate log-in and password.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Enterprises Migrating IT Infrastructure Investments to the Cloud – IDC Report

IDC Logo square 300x300 Enterprises Migrating IT Infrastructure Investments to the Cloud – IDC ReportThe cloud infrastructure sales increased over 25% to almost $ 6.3 billion in the first quarter 2015 as the companies are undertaking more and more workload by outsourcing their IT to the cloud.

According to the analyst firm IDC, the cloud infrastructure market segment registers second highest growth. As a logical consequence, the technologies that the basis for the cloud, such as servers, storage systems and Ethernet switches, account for 30% of expenditure in 2015, against 26.4% in 2014.

The growth of Cloud IT infrastructure continues to outperform the overall market of IT infrastructure, driven by companies’ decision to move their workloads to cloud platforms. In this context, HP maintained its position as No. 1 in the world with a 15.7 % market share, followed by Dell (11.9%), Cisco (9.3%), EMC (7.2%) NetApp (4.4%) and Lenovo (3.6%).

However, it is noteworthy that this upward trend is certainly general in the world, with the exception of areas of Eastern and Central Europe, where the cloud infrastructure sales declined over the period. IDC attributes this to the unstable political and economic climate.

The report says “end users continue to evaluate various approaches to adopting cloud-based IT: some integrate public cloud service into their IT strategies, others choose to build their own private clouds or use third-party private cloud offerings, and some, seeing benefits in both, implement hybrid cloud strategies. The breadth and width of cloud offerings only continue to grow, with an increasing universe of business- and consumer-oriented solutions being born in the cloud and served better by the cloud. This growing demand from the end user side and expansion of cloud-based offerings from service providers will continue to fuel growth in spending on the underlying IT infrastructure in the foreseeable future.”

Investments are growing in both public cloud and private cloud. But it is the public cloud that carves the lion’s share with two-thirds of the cloud infrastructure expenditures dedicated to them. While sales of private cloud rose 24.4% to $ 4.2 billion, those of public cloud have evolved similarly, a 25.5% increase to $ 3.9 billion.

The report further noted that “Cloud IT infrastructure growth continues to outpace the growth of the overall IT infrastructure market, driven by the transition of workloads onto cloud-based platforms. Both private and public cloud infrastructures have been growing at a similar pace, suggesting that customers are open to a broad array of hybrid deployment scenarios as they modernize their IT for the 3rd Platform, begin to deploy next-gen software solutions, and embrace modern management processes that enable agile, flexible, and extensible cloud platforms.”

In the next five years, IDC expects spending on cloud infrastructures continue to grow, and their share of total infrastructure spending should increase to 50% as companies continue to turn increasingly to the public cloud.


CloudTimes

451 Research shows cloud costs falling slowly, but unearths huge savings for enterprises willing to commit




The latest 451 Research Cloud Price Index™ finds that while on-demand pricing has fallen only slightly at 2.25% since October 2014, it is nowhere near matching the 12% reduction achieved by those enterprises that negotiate and commit.

Using 451 Research’s cloud pricing model, representing a typical multi-service on-demand application, the cost is now $ 1.68 per hour; in October 2014, the cost for the equivalent basket of cloud services was $ 1.72.

Revealing the extent to which service providers encourage commitment to help them plan capacity and ensure capital for infrastructure investment, 451 Research’s best-case price indicator is only $ 0.95 – a huge 44% savings compared to on-demand. The best-case price measures the same application used the same way as on-demand pricing, but takes into consideration negotiation, subscriptions, reserved instances, term commitments, and sustained-use discounts.

Although the Cloud Price Index shows compute pricing has fallen by 4% and bandwidth has come down 3%, service providers are enjoying increased revenue and profits from other services such as management, PaaS, data and storage pricing, which have remained static over the same period.

“If you believe the hype, public cloud providers are in a cutthroat price war and ‘race to the bottom,’ where margins are being slashed, and profitability is at risk,” said Dr. Owen Rogers, senior analyst at 451 Research’s Digital Economics unit.

“The reality is there is no cloud price war. There are battles being fought over certain cloud services, particularly compute, where providers are seeking publicity and market share in return for price cuts. But cloud providers are more than just compute – considering 50% of our typical Web application’s costs relate to cloud databases, it’s easy to see how sales of more value-adding services can offset declining margins on basic services,” commented Rogers.

“Cloud has no bottom price,” Rogers adds. “Even if infrastructure is eventually given away for free, as long as the provider sells other services, which offset this loss, then it can still be a profitable business.”

The Cloud Price Index™ from 451 Research

451 Research created the Cloud Price Index to understand the real-world cost of cloud over time. Like a consumer price index, 451 Research’s Cloud Price Index is made up of a basket of goods, but in this case, it is a specification of the services required to operate a typical Web server application. The Cloud Price Index is the specification of a multi-service three-tier cloud application consisting of Linux VMs, object storage, block storage, relational databases, NoSQL databases, load balancing, access control lists and snapshot backup in a resilient architecture.

451 Research collects quotes from providers including AWS, CenturyLink, Colt, Google, Microsoft, Rackspace, Swisscom, Verizon and Windstream, representing 70% of today’s cloud market. By considering not just compute and storage in our basket, 451 analysts can understand pricing when related to end users’ real expenses, as well as service providers’ overall strategies. And we can analyze pricing now only in terms of on-demand consumption, but also when related to enterprise commitments and negotiations.

About 451 Research

451 Research is a preeminent information technology research and advisory company. With a core focus on technology innovation and market disruption, we provide essential insight for leaders of the digital economy. More than 100 analysts and consultants deliver that insight via syndicated research, quarterly market surveys of over 3,000 industry professionals, advisory services and live events to more than 1,000 client organizations in North America, Europe and around the world. Founded in 2000 and headquartered in New York, 451 Research is a division of The 451 Group. Learn more.