Docker Enterprise now runs Windows and Linux in one cluster

With the newest Docker Enterprise Edition, you can now have Docker clusters composed of nodes running different operating systems.

Three of the key OSes supported by Docker—Windows, Linux, and IBM System Z—can run applications side by side in the same cluster, all orchestrated by a common mechanism.

Clustering apps across multiple OSes in Docker requires that you build per-OS images for each app. But those apps, when running on both Windows and Linux, can be linked to run in concert via Docker’s overlay networking.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Must-have features for enterprise VoIP

If your company has 100+ users and is in the market for a hosted VoIP phone system, be careful.

Remember the scene in the movie Tommy Boy, “Fat Guy in a Little Coat”? You don’t want your company’s new phone system to feel like this.

You won’t hear it from the salespeople [collective gasp] but most hosted VoIP solutions are designed for micro-size companies. If you want an “enterprise” system, you will have to dig a little to find a provider catering to larger companies.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: How SaaS abandonment is killing your enterprise bottom line

Ten years ago every company bought enterprise software, often in abundance. Today, 96% of organizations have now shelved some or all of it. While buying software is daunting, it is essential for competing in increasingly sophisticated industries.

The right software stack can give companies a competitive advantage, and because it is so much easier to buy today, brands are increasingly open to buying from more and more vendors.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Microsoft’s DNA storage tech may fit in an enterprise

Microsoft has apparently firmed up its plans for a DNA-based storage device that it expects to be commercially available within about three years.

The software giant originally unveiled its research into DNA as an archival storage medium last year; it described the technology being able to store the amount of data in “a big data center compressed into a few sugar cubes. Or all the publicly accessible data on the Internet slipped into a shoebox.

“That is the promise of DNA storage — once scientists are able to scale the technology and overcome a series of technical hurdles,” the company said in a 2016 blog post.

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Network World Cloud

IDG Contributor Network: Docker draws distinctions between enterprise and community editions

Docker Inc., the company known for popularizing the concept of containers, is refining its business model and product portfolio by ‘containerizing’ Docker.

The company has renamed the Docker Commercially Supported (CS) edition to the Docker Enterprise Edition (EE). It’s also changing the name of Docker Engine to Docker Community Edition.

But renaming isn’t the only change. “Docker Enterprise Edition is more than the CS Engine, as we’ve built a complete certification program around it for both container content and platform plugins on the Docker platform and announced partners,” said David Messina, SVP of Marketing, Docker Inc., in an email. “Additionally, we’ve made it modular, bundling several different options for organizations depending on their requirements.”

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CIO Cloud Computing

‘Meet’ Google’s new videoconferencing service for the enterprise

Google appears to have accidentally revealed its new group videoconferencing service for businesses on Tuesday, a week before a big user conference.

The service, called Meet, appears to be its offering for businesses that want to do group meetings over the Internet. According to a saved iOS App Store listing captured by AppAnnie, it will support high-definition video meetings with up to 30 participants. That’s an upgrade over the company’s Hangouts instant messaging and video calling service, which only allows meetings of up to 10 people.

google meet merged Google/AppAnnie

A trio of screenshots shows Google Meet’s functionality on iOS

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Cisco unveils Hierarchy of Needs for the digital enterprise

The European edition of Cisco Live took place this week in Berlin, which is a fitting location given the amount of innovation happening in that city right now. If you ever find yourself in Berlin, be sure to check out Cisco’s Open Berlin innovation center where inventive start-ups are building and showcasing solutions that run on Cisco technology.

Innovation and digital transformation are linked together like Kirk and Spock. You can’t have one without the other. At this week’s event, Ruba Borno, Cisco vice president of growth initiatives and chief of staff for the office of the CEO, gave her first-ever keynote to a Cisco Live audience. Not surprisingly, she focused on digital transformation. However, unlike many keynotes I have seen, Borno didn’t just talk about digitization at a high level. Instead she was more prescriptive and gave the audience a guide on how to proceed with making the shift to a digital enterprise. 

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Network World Cloud Computing

Google Cloud Search helps enterprise users find data quickly

Google is wooing enterprise customers with the forthcoming launch of a service that will let employees find information they need from multiple sources.

Cloud Search is a new service that will allow users to find content from their company email, cloud storage and directory. Directory lookup provides users not only with their colleagues’ contact details, but also information about shared files and calendar events. More than that, Cloud Search is also built to proactively help users access information they need.

When users log into Cloud Search either on the web or on their Android device, they’ll be greeted by “assist cards” that are supposed to highlight key files. At launch, those cards are built to show users files that are relevant for their upcoming calendar events, as well as those that require attention based on recent edits.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Cisco, HPE led $88B enterprise infrastructure market in ’16, Synergy says

Despite more and more companies outsourcing workloads to the public cloud, legacy technology stalwarts Cisco and HPE remain the most popular enterprise infrastructure vendors, new estimates from Synergy Research suggest.

Synergy tracked enterprise infrastructure spending across seven categories for the 12 months leading up to the end of Q3 2016: Data center servers; switches & routers; network security; voice systems, WLAN; UC Apps and telepresence. In aggregate it estimates revenues were $ 88 billion across these segments, with spending down about 1% from the same time period in 2015.

+MORE AT NETWORK WORLD: This company is transferring 50 Petabytes of data to Amazon’s cloud +

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Network World Cloud Computing

AWS touts new enterprise workload magnet

Amazon Web Services recently announced a new Managed Services product for its public cloud that aims to ease migration of legacy enterprise applications to that cloud.

AWS Managed Services is a series of infrastructure operations management tools meant to provide ongoing management, support, monitoring and security of an AWS cloud environment. It’s delivered jointly by AWS employees and certified AWS partners and is meant to serve AWS’s largest clients who are planning to migrate workloads to Amazon’s public cloud.

+MORE AT NETWORK WORLD: 10 Must-watch IaaS cloud trends for 2017 | Why Azure’s chief believes Microsoft is in prime position in IaaS +

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Network World Cloud Computing

2016’s top trends in enterprise computing: Containers, bots, A.I. and more

It’s been a year of change in the enterprise software market. SaaS providers are fighting to compete with one another, machine learning is becoming a reality for businesses at a larger scale, and containers are growing in popularity.

Here are some of the top trends from 2016 that we’ll likely still be talking about next year.

Everybody’s a frenemy

As more companies adopt software-as-a-service products like Office 365, Slack and Box, there is increasing pressure for companies that compete with each another to collaborate. After all, nobody wants to be stuck using a service that doesn’t work with the other critical systems they have.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

The enterprise wish-list for the hybrid cloud

If you know how to drive one car, you know how to drive pretty much any car. The gas pedal is always on the right and brake on the left. Push the turn signal up to go right and down to go left. Whether it’s a Ford or a Toyota, you don’t need to relearn how to drive each car.

Public cloud should be the same way, argues Bob Wysocki, CTO of Digital Infrastructure for General Electric and a member of the Open Networking User Group (ONUG). This week at ONUG’s annual fall meeting in New York a key theme is making it easier for enterprises to use public IaaS cloud services. Earlier this year ONUG created a new Hybrid Cloud Working Group that has created a sort of wish-list of what enterprise customers from GE, Pfizer, Citigroup and Gap would like to see from public cloud vendors to achieve easier usability.

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Network World Cloud Computing

As Dell and HPE revamp, Lenovo sets sights on enterprise cloud servers

The cloud — both on-premise and off-premise — is transforming servers and data centers, and many companies are getting vendors to customize hardware for specific cloud-based workloads.

Lenovo wants a bigger chunk of that market and is working toward offering custom-built converged servers targeted at specific tasks. The company is also looking for a larger opportunity with custom hardware for large-scale customers.

Companies like Facebook, Google, and Amazon are designing their own servers for mega-data centers. These servers are designed to handle workloads specific to the company’s requirements, like responding to search requests or recognizing people in uploaded images.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

OpenText to buy Dell EMC’s enterprise content division

Canadian enterprise information management vendor OpenText has agreed to buy Dell Technologies’ EMC enterprise content division for $ 1.62 billion in a deal that, the companies say, will allow them to focus on their core missions.

The acquisition of the “highly profitable” Dell EMC Enterprise Content Division will allow OpenText to expand its related services to Asia and Africa and across a larger customer base, including the healthcare and oil production industries, said OpenText CEO and CTO Mark Barrenechea. 

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Can enterprise IT seem like a good deal again?

A few weeks ago, I sat on a panel hosted by CenturyLink on sustainability and efficiency in IT. At CenturyLink’s sunny Irvine, California, data center my co-panelists gathered ahead of going on stage and on camera. One of the panelists remarked that enterprise IT was dying—dying—slowly dying. But I believe this characterization is too broadly phrased and an inaccurate choice of words.

The enterprise’s data center paradigm has changed irrevocably. And it will progress on its change cycle as enterprises embark on fewer new builds, and trends show that market share favors the commercial data center service providers. The paradigm of public cloud puts the sometimes outmoded ways of the enterprise data centers and legacy enterprise IT into an unfavorable light. But rest assured, there are some positive signs for enterprise IT—and good results ahead—but some changes do need to occur.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Containers plant a flag in the enterprise

Containers are finally making their way into the real world. According to a survey out this week from Nginx, 20 percent of respondents say they use containers in production, and one-third of the respondents run containers for more than 80 percent of workloads. Both developments are huge.

I see this in my world as well, as large enterprises now do real work with Docker and CoreOS.

On the surface, the objective is portability. Containers let you move from cloud to cloud with little or no modifications. However, the chances are low that a Global 2000 IT shop will move from Cloud A to Cloud B anytime soon.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Google cloud chief on tackling the enterprise

SAN FRANCISCO — Google is looking to strategically tackle the enterprise cloud market by open sourcing some of its internal technologies, embracing a multiplatform design principle and setting what it thinks are reasonable expectations for what its customers should move into the public cloud. The company hopes to continue making strides in the crowded market, which Amazon dominates, by helping enterprises identify business processes that can rapidly transition to the cloud and deliver the fastest ROI.

Now that companies can store all the data they want in the cloud for as little as $ 0.01 per GB per month, figuring out what to do with it all is a significant challenge, according to Greg DeMichillie, Google Cloud Platform’s (GCP) director of product management, who spoke with CIO.com at the GCP user conference last week. “It’s the needle in the haystack,” DeMichillie says. “Companies are drowning in data that they know, or that they suspect, there’s value in … but they don’t know how to get the value out of it.”

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CIO Cloud Computing

Blockchain, its new rival, and their future in the enterprise

Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies are already starting to shake up the financial services industry. They have also got entrepreneurs thinking about other applications for the blockchain technology that underlies them, including ones that address various processes inside non-financial companies such as contracts, audits and shipping. The digital signatures that certify each transaction and the distributed, write-only online ledger that constitute the core of the blockchain tech have the potential to offer even more security in these and other areas than more traditional approaches used by businesses.

Blockchain isn’t the only game in town either. The Linux Foundation recently revealed that it is leading an open source effort to develop an alternative to bitcoin’s underlying tech. The initiative, which has been dubbed the Open Ledger Project, is being supported by a coalition of leading financial services and tech companies, including Wells Fargo, State Street, the London Stock Exchange Group, Cisco, Intel, VMware and IBM. IBM, which has been a driving force behind the project, is reportedly contributing many thousands of lines of code to it as well as considerable developer resources.

The new kid on the block will have some catching up to do with blockchain, which is already being employed in some innovative ways. Nasdaq OMX, the parent company of the NASDAQ stock exchange, wants to use the tech to oversee trades in the stock of private firms and the Securities and Exchange Commission recently approved a plan by Overstock.com that involves the online retailer issuing stock using blockchain technology. Startups such as Digital Asset Holdings and Coinbase are also looking to profit from growing interest in digital tracking and trading using the new approach.

The firms that gain traction here will get plenty of attention. Investment banking firm Magister Advisors thinks that financial institutions will be spending a total of over $ 1 billion on blockchain-related projects in 2017. And finance is just one industry where the new technology could drive significant change. In the music world, startups such as PeerTracks and Bittunes are aiming to use it to revolutionize the way music is bought and shared. And in the art world, Verisart is harnessing the blockchain to improve the way art is secured and verified.

Looking at enterprise markets, there is a huge opportunity to apply blockchain technology or other variants in any place that involves swaps, trades or exchanges. One of the most obvious applications is in contractual situations where there is a need for proof that various parties are committed to a transaction. Companies such as Block Notary and Bitproof are developing ways to bind digital signatures into the blockchain and some firms are also experimenting with the technology to create escrow contracts that hold money on account until mutual agreement is recorded.

Another area where I expect to see more activity using blockchain technology is in auditing. Deloitte is one of a number of professional services firms that is experimenting with distributed digital ledgers. Here, transactions can be posted into a blockchain, which would apply a timestamp and act as a repository. Typically, auditors only choose a sample from a set of transactions to check; but using the new approach, it may well be possible to verify a much broader range of transactions securely and cost-effectively. There are a lot of regulatory issues still to be ironed out, but the opportunity to provide certainty with significantly less friction is a compelling one.

There is also a big opportunity to use the technology to improve shipping and supply chain management. An example of a startup here is Thingchain, which is applying a bitcoin-inspired cryptosystem to multiple use cases, including proving the provenance of goods and who owns them.

Many companies are still learning about the potential of blockchain technologies, so it may be some time before we see broad adoption beyond finance. But the potential is significant—and not only in the areas that I’ve outlined above. Entrepreneurs are already exploring enterprise applications that cover everything from patent registration to recording the results of boardroom votes. Expect to see more and more businesses joining the blockchain gang in 2016 and beyond.

Martin Giles is a partner at Wing Venture Capital (@Wing_VC). He was previously a journalist with The Economist.

Blockchain, its new rival, and their future in the enterprise originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

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Cloud

IDG Contributor Network: Why enterprise DevOps will make IT organizations and CIOs relevant

Digital business is changing the competitive environment; the proliferation of startups created by highly qualified unemployed seniors and entrepreneurs, the increasing adoption of cloud which reduces IT cost and the Internet of Things substituting traditional services with digital services are forcing business lines (BL) to opt for new paradigms. Market responsiveness achieved through flexible IT environments is what they need; extending DevOps to competitive and revenue issues and establishing it as the foundation of IT operating models is what’ll make IT organizations relevant. That’s what enterprise DevOps is about.

Why DevOps initiatives struggle to meet BL expectations

Despite its accelerated adoption, DevOps remains either misunderstood or improperly implemented. Today’s implementation approaches have several weaknesses: 

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CIO Cloud Computing

Google hires VMware co-founder as cloud chief, aims for enterprise adoption

VMware co-founder Diane Greene will oversee all of Google’s cloud businesses, including its Cloud Platform and Apps productivity suite, the company announced Thursday

Greene, who has been on the company’s board of directors for three years, took the position as the technology giant agreed to acquire Bebop, a stealthy startup that she co-founded. In a blog post announcing the news, Google CEO Sundar Pichai called the company’s product “a new development platform that makes it easy to build and maintain enterprise applications.”

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Meet the real architects of tomorrow’s enterprise cloud

In the not-too-distant future, you’re going to hear a lot more about the CNCF (Cloud Native Computing Foundation). The brainchild of Craig McLuckie, product manager for Google Cloud Platform and founder of Google’s Kubernetes project, the CNCF will lead the development of a standardized, open source platform for managing next-gen enterprise clouds of Docker containers.

Why is the CNCF so important? Because the future of enterprise computing is the cloud, and the future of the cloud is in the emerging container layer enabled by Docker and its rapidly expanding ecosystem. Basically, the CNCF’s mission is to take the hyperscale technology developed by such Internet giants as Google, Facebook, and Twitter and deliver it to the enterprise, resulting in what McLuckie calls “radical operational efficiencies.”

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing