General Electric: Dividend Cut?

General Electric’s (GE) shares fell to fresh 52-week lows last week as investors continue to be negative about the industrial company. While negative analyst commentary and concerns over General Electric’s dividend sustainability have more heavily weighed on investor sentiment lately, I think General Electric makes for an interesting contrarian ‘Buy’ today.

General Electric is not in an enviable position, and neither are shareholders that bought into the industrial company at a much higher valuation in the past. General Electric’s shares have slumped 27.3 percent year-to-date, falling to one new low after another. Last week, General Electric hit a new 52-week low @$ 22.83, extending a multi-week streak of losses.

See for yourself.

Source: StockCharts.com

A couple of factors have weighed on investor sentiment lately, including negative analyst commentary from JPMorgan that suggested General Electric might have to cut its dividend. According to a CNBC report, analysts at JPMorgan see a GE dividend cut as “increasingly likely”.

Not only did JPMorgan fuel the fire of doubt when it comes to General Electric’s dividend sustainability but the investment bank also lowered its price target for GE’s shares from $ 22 to $ 20, maintaining its firm ‘underweight’ rating on the stock. In addition, widely-followed media and investment personality Jim Cramer last week suggested that General Electric likely will cut guidance and may slash the dividend.

Given General Electric’s core industrial business weakness – keep in mind that GE’s industrial revenues slumped 12 percent and industrial/vertical EPS dropped 45 percent year on year in the second quarter on the back of a weak performance in oil & gas as well as transportation – a guidance revision is a distinct possibility, especially as it relates to GE’s industrial operating profit and margin guidance.

Source: General Electric

The real question, however, is whether General Electric will take the rather significant step and slash its dividend.

General Electric has cut its dividend in the past. The last time General Electric slashed its dividend payout was during the Great Recession when a lot of companies cut back on shareholder payments. In 2009, General Electric cut its quarterly cash dividend from $ 0.31/share to $ 0.10/share. However, GE’s dividend rate consistently edged up over the last eight years. General Electric’s long-term dividend history is impressive.

Source: General Electric

Will General Electric Have To Cut Its Dividend?

I don’t think General Electric will have to cut its dividend, although management could decide that it is better for the company to conserve cash and invest in General Electric’s industrial businesses directly. That said, here is why I think a dividend cut is relatively unlikely.

For one thing, General Electric has affirmed investors multiple times that the dividend is a ‘top priority’ for management. This statement suggests that management will remain committed to paying shareholders a steady dividend even though it costs the company a lot of cash. Remember that General Electric plans to return $ 8 billion in dividends to shareholders this year alone.

Further, I think General Electric will be able to maintain its dividend from a cash flow perspective.

General Electric has guided for $ 16-20 billion in free cash flow, including dispositions in 2017. A large part of this cash flow is contributed by GE Capital, which is expected to produce $ 6-7 billion in dividends for GE this year. In the first six months of 2017, GE Capital has already beefed up General Electric’s cash flow by $ 4 billion, making up for a significant portion of General Electric’s dividends to shareholders.

GE Capital dividends indeed play a crucial role in propping up General Electric’s cash flow. General Electric’s industrial free cash flow excluding deal taxes and pension expenses was actually negative $ 1.6 billion year to date, and total FCF only turned positive because of GE Capital’s dividend to the parent company. Shareholder dividends therefore depend largely on GE Capital’s cash flow, while GE’s industrial business on a standalone basis does not have the cash power right now to fund those payments.

Source: General Electric

I don’t think that General Electric will have to cut its dividend, though. General Electric has guided for $ 19-21 billion in capital returns this year of which only $ 8 billion are cash (and recurring). In other words, as long as GE can fall back on GE Capital for its dividend payments and the company cuts back on share buybacks, there is no immediate need to cut the dividend.

Your Takeaway

General Electric could adjust its dividend payout. Yes, but I consider this not that likely considering past management statements that the dividend is a ‘top priority’ and considering that GE Capital produces a LOT of cash for General Electric. General Electric has an impressive long-term dividend history which signals its commitment to shareholders, and I doubt management wants to put off investors with another dividend cut. I think investors are a bit too fearful right now, which is exactly the right time to get greedy. Buy for long-term dividend income and capital appreciation.

If you like to read more of my articles, and like to be kept up to date with the companies I cover, I kindly ask you that you scroll to the top of this page and click ‘follow‘. I am largely investing in dividend paying stocks, but also venture out occasionally and cover special situations that offer appealing reward-to-risk ratios and have potential for significant capital appreciation. Above all, my immediate investment goal is to achieve financial independence.

Disclosure: I am/we are long GE.

I wrote this article myself, and it expresses my own opinions. I am not receiving compensation for it (other than from Seeking Alpha). I have no business relationship with any company whose stock is mentioned in this article.

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UK inventor James Dyson to launch electric car by 2020

LONDON (Reuters) – James Dyson, billionaire inventor of the bagless vacuum cleaner, said on Tuesday his company was building an electric car which will launch by 2020, the latest firm to challenge traditional carmakers in a burgeoning market.

Tesla has already shaken up the sector around the world and Dyson said it would now spend 2 billion pounds ($ 2.7 billion) on solid-state battery technology and vehicle design.

Dyson had been developing new battery and electric motor technology for its vacuum cleaners and other products for the past 20 years, he said.

“Battery technology is very important to Dyson, electric motors are very important to Dyson, environmental control is very important to us,” Dyson, aged 71, said at his company’s flagship shop on London’s Oxford Street.

“I have been developing these technologies consistently because I could see that one day we could do a car.”

Dyson told staff in an email that the company finally had the opportunity to bring all its technologies together into a single product.

“Competition for new technology in the automotive industry is fierce and we must do everything we can to keep the specifics of our vehicle confidential,” he added.

Dyson said a 400-strong team of engineers had already spent 2-1/2 years working on the secret project in Malmesbury, Wiltshire, developing the batteries that will power the in-house designed electric motor for the car.

The firm has yet to decide on where the vehicle would be manufactured, although it has ruled out working with any existing auto companies, Dyson said.

Last year, the government said in a report it was helping to fund a new battery electric vehicle at the firm, which will secure 174 million pounds ($ 233 million) of investment in the area and create over 500 jobs.

The entry was quickly changed and Dyson declined to comment at the time in a sign of the secrecy shrouding the project.

Dyson said the firm needed to make the announcement on Tuesday because it was becoming hard to talk to subcontractors, government and potential new employees.

Writing by Paul Sandle and Costas Pitas; editing by Stephen Addison

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Yet, to reach the point where more than half of all new cars are fully electric by 2027—as Elon Musk predicted recently—there needs to be a massive undertaking that only the enterprise can understand. It is not a consumer endeavor but one that must be backed by IT, similar to an ERP roll-out or a massive Windows deployment.

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IBM, Vermont Electric spawn intelligent energy software company

IBM today said it would partner with Vermont Electric Power to create Utopus Insights to research develop and product intelligent analytic software for the energy industry.

IBM said Utopus will bring to market a full-featured energy analytics platform, built for cloud (SaaS), on-premises and distributed Internet of Things (IoT) operation.

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The platform will be built with open APIs that allow integration of third party tools and will include applications that enable best-in-class renewable forecasting, grid asset health and network risk analysis, and Distributed Energy Resource management, according to IBM Fellow, Dr. Chandu Visweswariah, who will be President and CEO of Utopus.

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