Don’t bet too soon on the hot cloud technologies

We all know what’s cool now in the cloud: microservices, devops, containers, and machine learning. It’s what guys like me are writing and speaking about. However, the overapplication of these technologies could end up hurting you greatly. Here’s why.

On one hand, I want to promote the use of new technology, such as cloud computing and containers. But, on the other hand, I need to have a good understanding of what business problems my clients are looking to solve, to determine the correct application of any technology, new, old, hyped, taken for granted, whatever. 

What typically happens is that the people looking to move into cloud are up on all the hyped technologies. It’s like shopping for a new car: You can have a pretty long list what you think you need: self-parking, heated seats, bending lights, voice assistance, childproof seating, maybe short-range flight.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Don’t bet too soon on the hot cloud technologies

We all know what’s cool now in the cloud: microservices, devops, containers, and machine learning. It’s what guys like me are writing and speaking about. However, the overapplication of these technologies could end up hurting you greatly. Here’s why.

On one hand, I want to promote the use of new technology, such as cloud computing and containers. But, on the other hand, I need to have a good understanding of what business problems my clients are looking to solve, to determine the correct application of any technology, new, old, hyped, taken for granted, whatever. 

What typically happens is that the people looking to move into cloud are up on all the hyped technologies. It’s like shopping for a new car: You can have a pretty long list what you think you need: self-parking, heated seats, bending lights, voice assistance, childproof seating, maybe short-range flight.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Don’t bet too soon on the hot cloud technologies

We all know what’s cool now in the cloud: microservices, devops, containers, and machine learning. It’s what guys like me are writing and speaking about. However, the overapplication of these technologies could end up hurting you greatly. Here’s why.

On one hand, I want to promote the use of new technology, such as cloud computing and containers. But, on the other hand, I need to have a good understanding of what business problems my clients are looking to solve, to determine the correct application of any technology, new, old, hyped, taken for granted, whatever. 

What typically happens is that the people looking to move into cloud are up on all the hyped technologies. It’s like shopping for a new car: You can have a pretty long list what you think you need: self-parking, heated seats, bending lights, voice assistance, childproof seating, maybe short-range flight.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Don’t let cloud providers kick you off like United

As everyone knows, last week a United Airlines passenger was asked to deplane because the airline overbooked and needed his seat for a staff member, then was dragged off the plane by Chicago airport cops when he refused to leave. Yes, the passenger didn’t follow the rules, but the situation ultimately was United’s fault.

Believe it or not, what happened at United is an object lesson for any business that signs up for cloud services. I’ll explain shortly.

Back in 2007, I boarded a United flight that was overbooked, and I was asked to deplane as a result. It was inconvenient and humiliating. However, I didn’t go limp, and the cops didn’t drag me bleeding off the flight.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Run, don’t walk, from China’s Big Brother law

China’s National People’s Congress has drafted a second version of a controversial cybersecurity law. It would bring a great deal of censorship for both foreign and domestic citizens and businesses, whether they use the cloud or not.

China is a wasteland for the modern internet. Websites like Facebook and Google are blocked. Moreover, web traffic is monitored and censored by the government. It’s Big Brother for real.

The latest draft of the law aims to require any site operator, whether foreign or domestic, to comply with the “social morals” of China. Moreover, they must accept government censorship.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Brexit: What it means for Tech (but don’t panic)

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Are There Workloads that Don’t Belong in the Public Cloud?

According to ESG research, 75% of organizations are currently using a public cloud service while another 19% have plans or interest in doing so (note: I am an ESG employee).  Furthermore, 56% of all public cloud-based workloads are considered IT production workloads while the remaining 44% are classified as non-production workloads (i.e. test, development, staging, etc.).

This trend has lots of traditional IT vendors somewhat worried, as well they should be.  Nevertheless, some IT veterans believe that there are limitations to this movement.  Yes, pedestrian workloads may move to the public cloud over the next few years but business-critical applications, key network-based business processes, and sensitive data should (and will) remain firmly planted in enterprise data centers now and forever.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Amazon Kindle Fire fail: Don’t buy these useless tablets (and Wintergatan)

Amazon.com comes under fire for disabling encryption on Kindle Fire tablets, and other toys that use the Android-fork Fire OS 5. Since the “quiet” change, the devices can no longer encrypt the data stored in them.

Cue: Tedious comparisons with Apple. When asked, Amazon PR explained users didn’t care for the feature. Perhaps that had something to do with the utterly weak CPUs inside these nasty, plastic boxes.

In IT Blogwatch, bloggers know the value of nothing. Not to mention: Check out this amazing musical instrument

Your humble blogwatcher curated these bloggy bits for your entertainment. [Developing story: Updated 11:47 am PT with more comment.]

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

10 things you don’t need to worry about in 2016

Life is tough, then you die, so please enjoy Arby’s. In the meantime, why worry?

Kidding! We all know there’s plenty to worry about. So as my annual public service, I offer you you 10 things you definitely don’t need to worry about in 2016. This year, as a bonus, I’ve tacked on a report card assessing last year’s predictions.

1. The Dell-EMC merger

Big mergers take time. However, this is a merger of the walking dead in the era of containers, cloud, and cheap SSDs. The next generation of large data centers uses something that looks more like local storage and distributed file systems. If this trend catches on in corporate environments, EMC’s main SAN business is in trouble. With increased reliance on cloud and centralization, there’s less reason to fill stacks of servers in little corporate data centers around the country.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Cloud backup: Don’t rely on your provider alone

You’ve moved data to the cloud. Now it’s time to talk about disaster recovery — how to build a resilient system that can recover from catastrophic failure.

Amazon Web Services, for example, says its S3 service “is designed to deliver flexibility, agility, geo-redundancy, and robust data protection.” To IT, that means the system is fault-tolerant, managing the resiliency needs for you. (“Geo-redundancy” means that, if a center goes down, another center in another part of the country or world will pick up the load. You should never miss a beat.)

If AWS and other public cloud providers include a certain amount of resiliency services, does that mean your data is safe? For the most part, it is. Public cloud providers take great pains to see that data is not lost — ever.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing