Docker Enterprise now runs Windows and Linux in one cluster

With the newest Docker Enterprise Edition, you can now have Docker clusters composed of nodes running different operating systems.

Three of the key OSes supported by Docker—Windows, Linux, and IBM System Z—can run applications side by side in the same cluster, all orchestrated by a common mechanism.

Clustering apps across multiple OSes in Docker requires that you build per-OS images for each app. But those apps, when running on both Windows and Linux, can be linked to run in concert via Docker’s overlay networking.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

What is Docker? Linux containers explained

Like FreeBSD Jails and Solaris Zones, Linux containers are self-contained execution environments—with their own, isolated CPU, memory, block I/O, and network resources—that share the kernel of the host operating system. The result is something that feels like a virtual machine, but sheds all the weight and startup overhead of a guest operating system.

In a large-scale system, running VMs would mean you are probably running many duplicate instances of the same OS and many redundant boot volumes. Because containers are more streamlined and lightweight compared to VMs, you may be able to run six to eight times as many containers as VMs on the same hardware.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: In an effort to get its house in order, Docker containerizes and ships out its CEO

Big changes for Docker Inc. What’s behind them, and what does it mean?

News that Docker Inc., the commercial organization behind the open source Docker initiative, has replaced its CEO will come as a shock to many, and not to others. I recently covered some PR blunders that Docker has made but these, to be honest, are simply symptoms of a far more serious malady — a company that has a massive valuation, huge interest, a growing ecosystem but is under pressure to tie that all together into a viable business. Quite simply, Docker (the open source project) is far more successful than its eponymously named commercial entity and there is pressure for that to change. Indeed, recently I took part in a panel discussing the recent DockerCon conference and all it means for the business.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Docker draws distinctions between enterprise and community editions

Docker Inc., the company known for popularizing the concept of containers, is refining its business model and product portfolio by ‘containerizing’ Docker.

The company has renamed the Docker Commercially Supported (CS) edition to the Docker Enterprise Edition (EE). It’s also changing the name of Docker Engine to Docker Community Edition.

But renaming isn’t the only change. “Docker Enterprise Edition is more than the CS Engine, as we’ve built a complete certification program around it for both container content and platform plugins on the Docker platform and announced partners,” said David Messina, SVP of Marketing, Docker Inc., in an email. “Additionally, we’ve made it modular, bundling several different options for organizations depending on their requirements.”

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CIO Cloud Computing

Lessons from launching billions of Docker containers

The Iron.io Platform is an enterprise job processing system for building powerful, job-based, asynchronous software. Simply put, developers write jobs in any language using familiar tools like Docker, then trigger the code to run using Iron.io’s REST API, webhooks, or the built-in scheduler. Whether the job runs once or millions of times per minute, the work is distributed across clusters of “workers” that can be easily deployed to any public or private cloud, with each worker deployed in a Docker container.

At Iron.io we use Docker both to serve our internal infrastructure needs and to execute customers’ workloads on our platform. For example, our IronWorker product has more than 15 stacks of Docker images in block storage that provide language and library environments for running code. IronWorker customers draw on only the libraries they need to write their code, which they upload to Iron.io’s S3 file storage, where our message queuing service merges the base Docker images with the user’s code in a new container, runs the process, then destroys the container.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Puppet and Chef make way for Docker

DockerCon sailed through Seattle recently, leaving behind in its wake a new swath of rapid adopters plus a trail of related company and product announcements. Docker itself produced perhaps the most exciting announcements of all with the launch of its DockerStore, a searchable marketplace for validated software and tools used in the Docker format, plus the launch of version 1.12 of its software, currently in public beta.

But the most important message delivered during the event came from Docker’s CEO, Ben Golub, who stated during his keynote address (video below) that upwards of 70 percent of enterprise companies have now implemented containerization.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Docker rolls out an orchestration engine. Because what customers want, customers get

Ever since it became obvious that Docker was onto something pretty special, there have been questions about how the company would parlay its rapidly increasing venture-backed valuation into monetization and, by extension, what that would mean for the significant ecosystem of third-party software vendors and service providers that Docker has built around its eponymously named movement.

Indeed, there have been times over the past years when Docker has made acquisitions of ecosystem players or introduced functionality as part of the platform that has been somewhat competitive to one or other members of its ecosystem. These moves had been met with a degree of concern and worry. Over time, however, the ecosystem has matured and has come to realize that Docker has no option but to extend its functional footprint, which it will do in a broadly open way. And while there will certainly be some casualties from the roster of ISVs around Docker, the approach of making its own technology “swappable” for third-party tools gives some of these players a bit of an out.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Containers 101: Linux containers and Docker explained

Like FreeBSD Jails and Solaris Zones, Linux containers are self-contained execution environments — with their own, isolated CPU, memory, block I/O, and network resources — that share the kernel of the host operating system. The result is something that feels like a virtual machine, but sheds all the weight and startup overhead of a guest operating system.

In a large-scale system, running VMs would mean you are probably running many duplicate instances of the same OS and many redundant boot volumes. Because containers are more streamlined and lightweight compared to VMs, you may be able to run six to eight times as many containers as VMs on the same hardware.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Weaveworks moves beyond Docker with plug-in for Kubernetes

An announcement coming today from networking vendor Weaveworks is interesting in and of itself, but even more so when seen in the broader context.

Weaveworks is the vendor behind Weave, a networking and monitoring tool for the Docker containerization platform. The company is today announcing the availability of a plug-in for the Kubernetes cloud-native operating system. Weave Net 1.5 works with the Kubernetes Container Networking Interface and allows multicast networking integrated with Kubernetes-based applications.

Weaveworks is talking up the applicability of this offering to specific verticals, in particular, the financial services industry:

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Network World Cloud Computing

4 no-bull takeaways about Docker Cloud

Late last year, Docker snapped up cross-cloud container management service Tutum, but it wasn’t clear how the acquired company’s handiwork would manifest under the Docker brand.

Earlier this week, we found out: Tutum reemerged as Docker Cloud amid little fanfare, but with more than only the badges swapped on the product. Cloud now cross-integrates with all of Docker’s other services, and Docker promises to unveil more features for shortly.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

The sun sets on original Docker PaaS

In yet another sign that the Docker container technology has grown bigger than any one PaaS, the dotCloud PaaS from which Docker originated will be shut down Feb. 29, as it no longer has a discernible advantage over more upscale competitors.

Docker was originally created as an internal application for dotCloud by Solomon Hykes, but generated so much interest that it was spun off into its own product. dotCloud even changed its name to Docker Inc., to better declare its newfound direction, and eventually sold dotCloud to the Berlin-based startup CloudControl, a PaaS used mainly by European customers.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Sponsored post: How will Docker integrate with IT infrastructure?

The explosion of interest in Docker has made clear that containers will profoundly affect the computing environment of the future. However, they are quite new and how they will integrate into infrastructure and application architectures and operations is, as yet, unclear. Still to be defined are important issues regarding networking, storage access, container orchestration, application lifecycle integration, and elasticity.

To address these issues, entrepreneur and investor Alexis Richardson joins Bernard Golden, VP of Strategy at ActiveState, on the next Fireside Chat webcast on Tuesday, March 10, 9 AM Pacific / 12 PM Eastern/ 5 PM GMT.

This interactive discussion focuses on the future of container technologies such as Docker in enterprise IT environments, and Richardson’s current open source project, Weave, which enables Docker virtual networking across multiple hosts.

Discussion topics include:

  • Who owns containers – applications or operations?
  • Integrating containers into infrastructure environments
  • How does Weave integrate with containers? Is it complementary or competitive with other container technologies like Kubernetes and Mesos?
  • Containers and the application lifecycle
  • Supporting technologies such as Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS)

About the Guest Speaker: Alexis Richardson is the founder of Weaveworks, makers of Weave. Previously, Alexis was Head of Product for App Suite & Real Time Intelligence at Pivotal, where he led commercial vFabric products that moved to Pivotal from VMware, including open source projects Spring, RabbitMQ, Redis and Tomcat.

Audience questions will be addressed in real-time and can be submitted on Twitter using #CLFchat. Registration is currently open at fireside.activestate.com.

How will Docker integrate with IT infrastructure? originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

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