AWS, Microsoft and Google take different paths to the cloud

SAN FRANCISCO — An outage at Amazon Web Services Tuesday rekindled the debate about whether it is wise to rely too heavily on one cloud service provider. Such snafus are rare for AWS so CIOs worry more about the potential for vendors to turn off their service without notice.

But CIOs who bet on multiple providers often invite challenges, including committing resources to work with each vendor, said Adrian Cockcroft, vice president of cloud architecture strategy for Amazon Web Services, at this week’s WSJ CIO Network conference, which included also appearances from executives running Microsoft and Google’s cloud businesses.

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CIO Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Measuring cloud performance: A different approach needed

As Lord Kelvin almost said, “To measure is to know.” But this simple dictum is surprisingly hard to follow. For it really has two meanings.

The first meaning is obvious: You cannot really know about something without measuring it. If you want to know how quickly an application works, for instance, take some key functions of the application and measure how long they take. “Good performance” is defined by the function taking less time than the acceptable threshold, and poor performance is defined by the function taking more time.

+ Also on Network World: Measurement is key to cloud success +

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Network World Cloud Computing

How Rackspace’s container platform is different

Unsurprisingly, Rackspace has joined the legions of other cloud vendors supporting application containers with a new service named Carina.

But what is interesting is Rackspace’s approach: The managed cloud company is offering customers the opportunity to run Docker application containers on bare metal – meaning not in virtual machines that use a hypervisor.

+MORE AT NETWORK WORLD: Is anyone actually using containers? +

Many other cloud providers – most notably Amazon Web Services and VMware – have resisted offering bare metal servers, mostly because using virtual machines allows them to either run their infrastructure more efficiently (in the case of AWS), sell more hypervisors (VMware), or use their existing management tools. There are pros and cons to running containers on bare metal and virtual machines, and arguments on both sides. Read more about some of those arguments here.

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Network World Cloud Computing