Microsoft acquires cloud-based HPC developer

Microsoft pulled off a big get with its acquisition of Cycle Computing, the developer of a suite of high-performance computing (HPC) services called CycleCloud for cloud orchestration, provisioning and data management in the cloud.

You may not know its name but Cycle Computing is actually a major player. In 2012, it helped Amazon create the first massive cloud-based supercomputer, spanning 51,000 cores. For just one hour of run time, the bill was $ 5,000.

+ Also on Network World: Azure Stack: Microsoft’s private-cloud platform and what IT pros need to know about it +

In 2013, Cycle Computing hit its biggest cloud run, creating a cluster of 156,314 cores with a theoretical peak speed of 1.21 petaflops that ran for 18 hours and spanned Amazon data centers around the world. The bill for that monstrosity was $ 33,000. 

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Network World Cloud Computing

5 things to expect from Microsoft’s Build developer conference

Microsoft executives will take the stage at Moscone West in San Francisco on Wednesday for the first of two keynote addresses to the company’s big Build developer conference. Here are five key things to expect from the next two days of Microsoft announcements:

1. New features in Windows 10 for developers and end users alike

Last year, Microsoft used Build to show off its vision for developing applications to run on what was then an unreleased operating system. In the intervening year, the company released Windows 10 to the world, and people have started using it in droves.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Nice SaaS, Amazon Web Services tells Italian software developer

Amazon Web Services has agreed to buy Nice, an Italian vendor of high-performance computing software and services to extend its as-a-service offering.

It’s Amazon.com’s second acquisition within six months of a software vendor that can put its cloud computing platform to new uses. The last was Elemental Technologies, in September

Nice is a niche outfit, with customers numbering in the hundreds, not thousands. Companies and research institutions in the aerospace, automotive, energy, life sciences and technology industries use its products to centralize HPC, cloud and visualization functions.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Bitcoin is a failed experiment, says major Bitcoin developer

Fissures in the Bitcoin community appear to be turning to chasms, with one prominent developer abandoning the cryptocurrency for good.

Mike Hearn, a longtime developer who often speaks about Bitcoin to the press and in presentations, wrote on Medium that he’s sold all his coins and will no longer participate in development.

“What was meant to be a new, decentralised form of money that lacked ‘systemically important institutions’ and ‘too big to fail’ has become something even worse: a system completely controlled by just a handful of people,” Hearn wrote. “Worse still, the network is on the brink of technical collapse. The mechanisms that should have prevented this outcome have broken down, and as a result there’s no longer much reason to think Bitcoin can actually be better than the existing financial system.”

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Network World Cloud Computing

Salesforce.com buys developer of quoting and billing apps for SMEs

If you can’t beat them, buy them: Salesforce.com is snapping up SteelBrick, a startup that builds quoting and billing functions for SMEs on the Salesforce cloud platform.

Apps built natively on the platform allow Salesforce.com customers to add functionality to their CRM systems with fewer integration hassles than they might face with software hosted elsewhere.

SteelBrick makes configure-price-quote and subscription-billing apps for small and medium-size enterprises, and recently added subscription billing functions with the acquisition of U.K.-based Invoice IT. The apps automate much of the process from establishing a customer’s requirements to collecting payment. Customers for the software include Japanese manufacturing company Mitsubishi Electric and Silicon Valley neighbors Cloudera and Nutanix.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing