Juniper’s Cloud-Grade networking aims to deliver network agility

There should be no question in anyone’s mind that the cloud era has arrived. Businesses are adopting the cloud at an unprecedented rate and by 2020, the number of cloud workloads will be on par with the number of on-premises ones.

Businesses of all sizes are turning to the cloud to help them become digital by increasing the level of agility. To be an agile business, though, the entire network stack—from the network through applications must be agile.

+ Also on Network World: Juniper heads to the clouds with Unite +

However, organizations are also more cost conscious than ever, so whatever solution is deployed must save money in addition to making the network more dynamic. 

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Network World Cloud Computing

Splice Machine seeks to deliver hybrid RDBMS as a service

Splice Machine, which specializes in an open source relational database for hybrid workloads, wants to bring that database to the cloud as a service.

The company announced this week that it will release Cloud RDBMS, a database-as-a-service (DBaaS) on Amazon Web Services (AWS) this spring. It noted that Cloud RDBMS will be able to power applications and perform analytics, without the need for ETL and separate analytical databases.

CIO Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: FR8 launches to deliver load trucking and fleet optimization

FR8 Revolution is a company that was founded a year ago with the vision of bringing data-driven, cloud-based tools to the trucking market.

It can be easy to forget about this industry when you shop at your favorite store, fast food outlet or e-commerce site, but in order to ensure your purchase happens seamlessly, a huge amount of logistics has to occur. It requires a lot of planning to ensure, for example, that a McDonald’s outlet in New York City in the middle of winter has fresh lettuce and tomatoes and enough french fries for demand. Where that planning rubber literally and figuratively meets the road is in the trucking industry.

The U.S. trucking industry alone is a $ 700 billion market and employs a staggering 3.5 million drivers. And while we’ve all been told a number of times that the future of trucking is autonomous vehicles, the truth behind that somewhat cliched statement is that it’s going to take a huge amount of software to actually make that prophecy come true.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing