Focusing on the cheapest cloud price could cost you more

Amazon Web Services really leads the way in determining market price for cloud services, and the second-, third-, and lower-tier cloud providers try to price their cloud services below that of AWS to steal its business. That is, until AWS drops prices—again.

Enterprises that focus only on cloud usage prices are missing the big—and more important—picture.

For example, say that you move 100 applications and their linked data to a public cloud provider. It charges you a certain usage price for compute and storage, which is set at the time you provision those resources. 

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

VMware-AWS deal could push more companies into the cloud

The cloud partnership AWS and VMware announced Thursday makes Amazon’s public cloud even more attractive for enterprises by letting them take the popular virtualization platform with them.

The appropriately named VMware Cloud on AWS , announced at a press conference in San Francisco, will bring cloud-optimized versions of vSphere, VSAN and NSX software to the cloud platform. When users spin up a VMware environment on AWS, they’ll get a cluster running the entire Software-Defined Data Center stack in the public cloud.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

VMware-AWS deal could drive more companies into the cloud

The cloud partnership AWS and VMware announced Thursday makes Amazon’s public cloud even more attractive for enterprises by letting them take the popular virtualization platform with them.

The appropriately named VMware Cloud on AWS , announced at a press conference in San Francisco, will bring cloud-optimized versions of vSphere, VSAN and NSX software to the cloud platform. When users spin up a VMware environment on AWS, they’ll get a cluster running the entire Software-Defined Data Center stack in the public cloud.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

‘Featuritis’ could lead you to the wrong cloud

Winning Evernote’s cloud business was a nice feather in Google’s cap — deservedly so. Google had put a great deal of effort in its machine learning offering in the Google cloud, and Evernote responded. I’m sure there were financial incentives as well.

The question then arises: Will enterprises buy cloud services — or even partner with cloud providers — around tactical features that they believe are important? Or will features trump market share?

Enterprise IT is tactically focused in many respects. While some IT departments will select cloud providers with the most customers and the most datacenters, others will look at specific features that a cloud provider may do well, such as machine learning.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

A blockchain ‘smart contract’ could cost investors millions

Investors in a “smart contract” built on the Ethereum blockchain platform may have lost cryptocurrency worth millions of dollars because they missed a loophole in the contract’s fine print.

The contract was written in Ethereum’s Solidity programming language, and the fine print was the code that set out the rules for investing in, operating, and withdrawing from a crowd-sourced venture capital fund called The DAO (The Distributed Autonomous Organization.) .

Ethereum, like other blockchains, is a distributed public ledger, or record of transactions. Where the bitcoin ledger records bitcoin transactions, the Ethereum blockchain records transfers of a cryptocurrency called Ether. But there’s more: Ethereum is also a platform for running smart contracts. Its creator, the Ethereum Foundation, describes smart contracts as “applications that run exactly as programmed without any possibility of downtime, censorship, fraud or third party interference.”

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Network World Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Information-centric networking could fix these internet problems

Information-centric networking (ICN) ticks many of the requirements boxes for 5G, driven by the proliferation of software-defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV). But what are those issues that ICN improves over the current internet? And how does it do it?

Today’s internet has seen significant changes. With forecasts for 2020 predicting 50 billion IoT devices, the scale of connectivity is ever increasing with nearly every computing device today providing some form of connectivity option.

This will have a tremendous impact on the size of IP routing tables. This is not a problem in your typical home router on the edge of the internet. But as you move up to the core (into the so called Default Free Zone), the nodes in this part of the network literally need to store the whole internet in their routing tables. This is driving up memory costs in each IP router, as well as increasing processing complexity and power consumption. Even in SDN-enabled environments, this trend can be observed through increasing flow matching tables (growing similarly as the IP routing tables in the traditional internet), leading to an arms’ race between vendors for ever larger and costly table memory.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Open-source really could help get you a job, study finds

Experience in the open-source world is a valuable asset for technology job-seekers, and it’s getting more so over time, according to the latest Open-Source Jobs Report, which was published today by Dice and the Linux Foundation.

The report, which surveyed tech hiring managers, found that nearly two-thirds were planning to increase open-source hiring more than other areas of their business in the near future, and that 59 percent had definite plans to add open-source workers.

The news was also good for open-source workers who are already employed. Four out of five hiring managers who responded to the survey said that they had increased incentives to retain open-source employees — 44 percent had hiked salaries to this end, while 43 percent had offered more flexible working conditions like telecommuting.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Microsoft’s Solair acquisition could expand its IoT services

Microsoft dove deeper into Internet of Things technology on Tuesday with the acquisition of Solair, an Italian company that operates a cloud-based IoT platform. 

According to a Microsoft blog post, Solair’s technology will be used to upgrade the company’s Azure IoT Suite, a collection of cloud services meant to help companies use the Internet of Things. 

Microsoft and Solair didn’t disclose the financial terms of their deal. 

Solair’s technology, which already uses Microsoft’s Azure cloud services, offers IoT services focused on a variety of markets, including home automation, smart metering, remote maintenance and inventory management. 

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Google Container Engine: Could it be evil?

Google Container Engine is finally out of beta. The search-engine-cum-advertising-broker is also all about that containerization.

But is Google’s use of open-source projects such as Docker and Kubernetes entirely unselfish? Or will proprietary Google “enhancements” lock you in?

In IT Blogwatch, bloggers float away, dreaming of simple devops. Not to mention: This airline doesn’t understand how wings work

Your humble blogwatcher curated these bloggy bits for your entertainment.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing