Azure Container Instances: No Kubernetes required

Microsoft has introduced a new container service, Azure Container Instances (ACI), that is intended to provide a more lightweight and granular way to run containerized applications than its Azure Container Service (ACS).

ACI runs individual containers that you can configure with specific amounts of virtual CPU and memory, and that are billed by the second. Containers can be pulled from various sources – Docker Hub, the Azure Container Registry, or a private repository – and deployed from the CLI or by way of an Azure template.

Microsoft is emphasizing how ACI is complementary to ACS, rather than a replacement for it. ACI is meant for smaller, more burst-able workloads, or as a way to temporarily satisfy a surge in demand, rather than as a way to deploy complex, long-running applications with many interdependencies between containers.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Apcera rolls out its container management platform

Apcera is an interesting company. Its founder, Derek Collison, was one of the key people behind Cloud Foundry back when it was a small platform project within VMware. Since then Cloud Foundry has gone on to become, arguably, the most important platform as a service (PaaS) organization on earth.

+ Also on Network World: PaaS vendors draw battle lines over containers +

Collison has moved on as well and founded Apcera, a company focused on giving large enterprises the certainty that comes from using a platform with security and policy baked in. In a world were organizations are hearing more and more about containers and cloud-native applications, having a platform that allows them to use these technologies within the context of tight policy is an attractive proposition.

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Network World Cloud Computing

ContainerX steps into the limelight with a new container platform for enterprises

Enterprises interested in tapping container technology now have a brand-new option for managing it: ContainerX, a multitenant container-as-a-service platform for both Linux and Windows.

Launched into beta last November by a team of engineers from Microsoft, VMware and Citrix, the service became generally available in both free and paid versions on Thursday. Promising an all-in-one platform for orchestration, compute, network, and storage management, it provides a single “pane of glass” for all of an enterprise’s containers, whether they’re running on Linux or Windows, bare metal or virtual machine, public or private cloud.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: CoreOS takes on container storage with Torus project

CoreOS, makers of the open-source lightweight operating system by the same name, has launched an open source project called Torus that aims to deal with some of the storage challenges of containers.

Torus is a fully open source distributed storage system that  provides storage primitives to containers and cluster orchestration platforms such as Kubernetes.

It’s not that there aren’t any legacy storage solutions that can be used with container infrastructure; there are. But they kind of create a mismatch between legacy technology and modern infrastructure. Existing storage solutions are intended for large machines, which in most cases are custom and proprietary hardware. Those solutions are expensive and not really designed for the clusters of small, inexpensive, commodity hardware that the modern cloud is built on.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Ex VMware, Microsoft, and Citrix workers set up application container company

In 2006 VMware released a breakthrough technology named dynamic resource scheduling (DRS), which allowed its virtual machine management software to automatically reallocate virtual machines among different applications based on their load.

A startup founded by some of the VMware team members who helped create that feature, which is backed by the former CTO of VMware who oversaw the project, is attempting to bring that same technology natively to application containers.

ContainerX is launching today and hopes to make a splash at the DockerCon EU conference next week in Spain — the semi-annual gathering of all things containers. ContainerX is a year old and has raised $ 2.7 million, including from backers Steve Herrod of General Catalyst, who is the former VMware CTO, and Jerry Chen of Greylock Partners, also a former VMware exec.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

How Rackspace’s container platform is different

Unsurprisingly, Rackspace has joined the legions of other cloud vendors supporting application containers with a new service named Carina.

But what is interesting is Rackspace’s approach: The managed cloud company is offering customers the opportunity to run Docker application containers on bare metal – meaning not in virtual machines that use a hypervisor.

+MORE AT NETWORK WORLD: Is anyone actually using containers? +

Many other cloud providers – most notably Amazon Web Services and VMware – have resisted offering bare metal servers, mostly because using virtual machines allows them to either run their infrastructure more efficiently (in the case of AWS), sell more hypervisors (VMware), or use their existing management tools. There are pros and cons to running containers on bare metal and virtual machines, and arguments on both sides. Read more about some of those arguments here.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Hypernetes unites Kubernetes, OpenStack for multitenant container management

Hyper, creator of a VM isolated container engine that’s compatible with Docker, has debuted a project for running multitenant containers at scale.

The Hypernetes project fuses the Hyper container engine with Kubernetes and uses several pieces from OpenStack to create what it describes as “a secure, multitenant Kubernetes distro.”

At the bottom of the Hypernetes stack is bare metal, outfitted with Hyper’s HyperD custom container engine to provision and run containers with VM-level isolation. Kubernetes manages the containers through HyperD’s API set. Other functions are controlled by components taken from OpenStack, including Keystone, for identity management and authentication; Neutron, for network management; and Cinder/Ceph, for storage volume management.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Google Container Engine: Could it be evil?

Google Container Engine is finally out of beta. The search-engine-cum-advertising-broker is also all about that containerization.

But is Google’s use of open-source projects such as Docker and Kubernetes entirely unselfish? Or will proprietary Google “enhancements” lock you in?

In IT Blogwatch, bloggers float away, dreaming of simple devops. Not to mention: This airline doesn’t understand how wings work

Your humble blogwatcher curated these bloggy bits for your entertainment.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing