Serverless computing may kill Google Cloud Platform

Google, which has had to claw its way back into cloud relevance in the shadows of Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure, suddenly finds itself playing catchup again, thanks to the rise of serverless computing. Although Google Cloud Platform still trails AWS and Azure by a considerable margin in general cloud revenue, its strengths in AI and container infrastructure (Kubernetes) have given it a credible seat at the cloud table.

Or would, if the world weren’t quickly moving toward a serverless future.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Cloud computing reversal: From ‘go away’ to ‘I can’t miss out’

Isaac Asimov once said, “I do not fear computers. I fear the lack of them.” That quote has stuck with me to this day. There’s no doubt that computers and computing have changed our lives. Without them, we would be slaves to processes and paper.

I was reminded of Asimov’s quote when I saw the results of a recent poll done by Comvault of 100 IT leaders. More than two thirds said that they were worried about keeping up to date with the latest products and iterations across the major cloud providers. In other words, they fear missing out.

About a quarter (24 percent) of those polled said they were a cloud-only organization, which perhaps means they are very small or very new businesses. Additionally, 32 percent said they are cloud-first, with plans to become cloud-only, so they are likely mid-sized businesses. Also, 6 percent said they did not have a specific migration plan, which means they are BDCs (big dumb companies).

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Edge computing: What you need to know before you deploy

I explained edge computing back in May, and how it’s related to cloud computing. But I continue to get questions on the use of edge computing, especially on whether should enterprises begin to use edge computing anytime soon. 

To make that decision, there are three aspects of edge computing that you should consider:

1. Edge computing is tactical, not strategic

Edge computing is about putting processing and data near the end points. This saves the information from being transmitted from the point of consumption, such as a robot on a factory floor, back to centralized computing platforms, such as a public cloud.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Microsoft rumor: Company to reorganize cloud computing division

Multiple news outlets in Seattle and the tech press report that Microsoft plans to announce a significant reorganization in an effort to refocus its cloud computing division. In the process, a lot of people are going to lose their jobs.

The Seattle Times, Puget Sound Business Journal, Bloomberg and TechCrunch all cite sources claiming that the news could come this week, and that could mean layoffs in the thousands. 

The Seattle Times said it was unclear what groups would be affected and where they are located but that the move would be to get its sales teams to emphasize its cloud computing products instead of pushing packaged software. 

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Network World Cloud Computing

Microsoft rumor: Company to reorganize cloud computing division

Multiple news outlets in Seattle and the tech press report that Microsoft plans to announce a significant reorganization in an effort to refocus its cloud computing division. In the process, a lot of people are going to lose their jobs.

The Seattle Times, Puget Sound Business Journal, Bloomberg and TechCrunch all cite sources claiming that the news could come this week, and that could mean layoffs in the thousands. 

The Seattle Times said it was unclear what groups would be affected and where they are located but that the move would be to get its sales teams to emphasize its cloud computing products instead of pushing packaged software. 

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Network World Cloud Computing

Microsoft rumor: Company to reorganize cloud computing division

Multiple news outlets in Seattle and the tech press report that Microsoft plans to announce a significant reorganization in an effort to refocus its cloud computing division. In the process, a lot of people are going to lose their jobs.

The Seattle Times, Puget Sound Business Journal, Bloomberg and TechCrunch all cite sources claiming that the news could come this week, and that could mean layoffs in the thousands. 

The Seattle Times said it was unclear what groups would be affected and where they are located but that the move would be to get its sales teams to emphasize its cloud computing products instead of pushing packaged software. 

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Network World Cloud Computing

IBM makes leap in quantum computing power

IBM has some new options for businesses wanting to experiment with quantum computing.

Quantum computers, when they become commercially available, are expected to vastly outperform conventional computers in a number of domains, including machine learning, cryptography and the optimization of business problems in the fields of logistics and risk analysis.

Where conventional computers deal in ones and zeros (bits) the processors in quantum computers use qubits, which can simultaneously hold the values one and zero. This — to grossly oversimplify — allows a quantum computer with a 5-qubit processor to perform a calculation for 32 different input values at the same time.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Cloud computing has another killer quarter

To most people, Jeff Bezos’ Amazon is known as the company reshaping the way people buy everything from books to shoes to groceries. But the part of Amazon that is driving Bezos within shouting distance of becoming the world’s richest person doesn’t really sell anything, it rents computing power in the cloud.

The cloud is more profitable than e-tailing

As the New York Times put it on Thursday, “The profit Amazon can make on cloud-computing services is significantly bigger than in its retail sales, and that has helped turn the Seattle company from a consistent money-loser to a respectable moneymaker.”

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Network World Cloud

Cloud computing has another killer quarter

To most people, Jeff Bezos’ Amazon is known as the company reshaping the way people buy everything from books to shoes to groceries. But the part of Amazon that is driving Bezos within shouting distance of becoming the world’s richest person doesn’t really sell anything, it rents computing power in the cloud.

The cloud is more profitable than e-tailing

As the New York Times put it on Thursday, “The profit Amazon can make on cloud-computing services is significantly bigger than in its retail sales, and that has helped turn the Seattle company from a consistent money-loser to a respectable moneymaker.”

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Network World Cloud

Serverless computing in practice

Alpha Vertex is a year-old New York City startup with an ambitious agenda: It wants to create a graph database of global financial knowledge.

CTO Michael Bishop says the goal is to use predictive modeling to help companies judge risk and investors get insight on what drives the market. To do so has required the company to build a massive technical back-end that uses some hottest emerging technologies. Two of the most important are Google’s cloud-based machine learning algorithms and IBM’s OpenWhisk, a serverless or Function-as-a-Service platform.

+MORE AT NETWORK WORLD: Serverless explainer: The next-generation of cloud infrastructure +

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Network World Cloud Computing

Edge computing will blow away the cloud

SAN FRANCISCO — The ubiquitous cloud computing craze may not be long for this world if venture capitalist Peter Levine is right. The Andreessen Horowitz general partner said that as more computing capabilities move to so-called “edge” devices, including anything from driverless cars and drones to the boundless devices that make up the internet of things (IoT), the cloud will slowly evaporate.

“A large portion of computation that gets done in the cloud today will return to the edge,” said Levine at the Wall Street Journal’s CIO Network event here Tuesday.

Levine said the driverless car, whose 200-plus CPUs effectively make it a “data center on wheels,” is a prime example of an edge device whose computing capabilities must be self-contained. Levine said that an autonomous vehicle relying on the cloud fo

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Network World Cloud Computing

Trump’s TPP trade move a setback for cloud computing

On the heels of the news that President Trump has removed the United States from the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a massive trade deal that he blasted as a candidate, experts warned of the fallout for cloud-computing companies that have been advocating for policies to break down digital trade barriers that restrict the flow of data traffic across international boundaries.

At the annual State of the Net tech policy conference in Washington, the news was met with disappointment by a panel of experts, who said that the provisions of the TPP governing the activities of tech companies would have been an important step toward establishing international norms for trade in the digital age.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

The pros and cons of serverless computing

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

2016’s top trends in enterprise computing: Containers, bots, A.I. and more

It’s been a year of change in the enterprise software market. SaaS providers are fighting to compete with one another, machine learning is becoming a reality for businesses at a larger scale, and containers are growing in popularity.

Here are some of the top trends from 2016 that we’ll likely still be talking about next year.

Everybody’s a frenemy

As more companies adopt software-as-a-service products like Office 365, Slack and Box, there is increasing pressure for companies that compete with each another to collaborate. After all, nobody wants to be stuck using a service that doesn’t work with the other critical systems they have.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Visibility, security top concerns for cloud computing adoption

Enterprises considering adopting public clouds are concerned about where their data is located and how it’s protected, according to a new survey by IDG.

Companies will have about 60 percent of their IT environment in public, private, or hybrid clouds, according to a survey of about 1,000 IT decision makers.

Of those considering public cloud deployments, the top concerns were where data is stored, at 43 percent of respondents, and security, with 41 percent of respondents.

And with all the high-profile hacks of well-known online brand names, it’s no surprise.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Nadella points to machine learning as battleground in cloud computing

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella has identified machine learning as the firm’s key focus as cloud computing usage becomes more widespread.

It is an area that is fast becoming the battleground for the big cloud providers. Google and Amazon Web Services both offer a range of tools that make it easier for developers to create “intelligent’ applications, while the likes of Salesforce are keen to incorporate artificial intelligence into their software services.

Speaking at an event in London’s Canary Wharf financial district, Nadella’s sales pitch placed emphasis on the role of machine learning across Microsoft’s range of cloud products – from infrastructure and platform as a service offering in Azure, to its Dynamics and Office365 cloud software.

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CIO Cloud Computing

VMware CEO pledges cloud computing freedom

In what’s become something of an annual tradition, we talked with VMware CEO Pat Gelsinger at the outset of the virtualization leader’s VMworld 2016 conference. In this interview with Network World Senior Writer Brandon Butler and IDG Chief Content Officer John Gallant, Gelsinger shared the big news from the event, including new tools that make it easier for customers to build cross-cloud environments, as well as an expanded partnership with IBM. With finalization of the Dell/EMC merger just over the horizon, Gelsinger reassured VMware customers about the company’s independence but said the resources available from that powerful ally will put ‘turbochargers’ on VMware’s back. He discussed the state of the software-defined data center and where customers stand in the deployment of virtual networks.

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